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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1913)"

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5AN FRANCISCO 

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Premier Little Six, made by Premier Motor Mfg. Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 



Is the Car You Are Thinking of Buying 
Up to Date or a Year Behind the Times ? 

EITHER THE AUTOMOBILE WITH 
Six Cylinders Self-Starting Motors 

Left Side Drive Electric Lights 

Clean Running Boards No Projecting Hinges 

No Projecting Lamps Tire Inf lator 

is a year ahead of the times, or without these appointments it is a year behind the times 



Would you make the mistake of buying a single or two-cylinder car? 
Of course not. 

Would you make the mistake of buying a four-cylinder car to-day. 
when in the seven months, or since August. 1912, more than five times 
as many manufacturers have taken up the six-cylinder car? 

Who would consider the purchase of an automobile to-day without fore 
doors? Not that such an automobile is not serviceable, but because it 
is out of date, and has not kept up with the times. 

In 1914, when every manufacturer who has been able to dispose of his 
old stock is advocating and building left-side drives, will not the right- 
side drive car be as unsalable and conspicuously out of date as is the 
car without fore doors to-day, except fore doors can be added, while a 
right-side drive cannot be changed to a left-side drive? 



Who would ever think of abandoning the left-side drive where the pas- 
sengers can enter from the sidewalk for a right-side drive where, in 
order to comply with traffic regulations requiring you to stop with the 
traffic on the right side of the street, the occupants of the front seat must 
dismount in the street or go out into the street to enter the car. 

The flush side body, with concealed hinges and clear running boards, 
will characterize the motor car of the future; the car with projecting 
hinges, tool boxes, battery boxes and spare tires on the running board, 
with projecting lamps and horns, will be conspicuously out of date. 

There is no question as to which of the characteristics will mark the 
car of the future. Be sure the car you are considering has these cleaner, 
later and more practical characteristics, and is not already a year or 
more behind the times. 



PREMIER 

"AMERICA'S GREATEST TOURING CAR" 

The first of the five leadingrnakerstoestablish the newprice basis for the high grade six was the Premier. Full touring car equipment, $2,735 to $4,000 

The Premier has earned its position as one of the leaders among America's leading cars by its wonderful performance and successful showing 
in the most trying tours and contests each year. Description of these tours and de luxe catalogue forwarded on request. 



F. H. DAILEY, Broadway and 22nd Street, Oakland, Cal. 



PREMIER MOTOR MFG. CO., Indianapolis, Ind. 






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BtUtilUtied July JO. t&M 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 5, 1913 



No. 1 



Even words yield to fashion's dictum. Strenuous has 

given way to insidious. 

Austria has ordered six new dirigible balloons. Dis- 
armament in Europe seems to be all up in the air at present. 

The English suffragettes seem to differ with the Illinois 

university professor, and prefer jail to marriage as an exciting 
career. 

That Illinois professor could not have been thinking of 

Nat or de Wolfe when he cracked that joke about marriage as 
a career. 

The idea of Huerta in full control in Mexico is not likely 

to create much of an impression among those who read of rebel 
successes in Mexico. 

President Wilson doesn't stand on etiquette in making 

his visits to Congress, nor does he seem to care whether they 
return their calls or not. 

There are a few people in the United States who do not 

care particularly whether the Democrats reduce the tariff on 
soap from 20 to 5 or not. 

And now Mexico is threatened with an attack from Cen- 
tral America. A peaceful Mexican presidential election is be- 
coming more impossible every day. 

Despite all reports to the contrary, the Christian Science 

Monitor says that New York is not a Suzerainty. One Hearst 
would be inclined to endorse the declaration. 

Newport and various other like resorts are compelled 

to take a back seat since policemen in Washington were pro- 
vided with parasols and officers with mesh bags. 

It would seem that the agricultural department at Wash- 
ington might well employ a live press agent. We don't hear 
much about its doings — it might be a good job for Teddy. 

Missouri is attempting to beat California in the sliding 

backward kind of Progressiveness. It is now using the referen- 
dum to postpone legislative action, and for no other reason. 

No wonder Queen Mary objects to people around the 

royal palace who keep diaries. So many of them have been so 
unsatisfactory in their praise of royal personages in the past. 

Perhaps after the Bulletin has swept the gutters clean 

of everything in the way of literature and other things, it may 
turn its attention to an attempt to really find something decent 

in life. 

Miss Jane Addams is mentioned as a possible candi- 
date for Mayor of Chicago. And some one even suggests her 
for candidate for President. Well, we cannot prevent women 
from joining in the class in which socialist candidates for 
President belong. 



The investigation as to who is and what is a lobbyist 

has caused a number of Congressmen and Senators to be very 
particular about just who they shall include upon their visiting 
lists. 

Just now it seems that slashed skirts are fated to usurp 

the place held by low wages in the minds of the moral reformer. 
And even men's bathing suits are the subject of serious dis- 
cussion. 

New Orleans reports a June temperature of 59. And 

folks down there thought they should have had the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition, when it's doubtful if New Orleans is even 
a good summer resort. 

Mr. Hearst and his friends may as well understand that 

the United States cannot be frightened into war any more than 
we have been frightened out of it in the past, so they may as 
well save their voices. 

Notwithstanding Mr. Hearst's doubts as to the future 

ruler of the portion of America now occupied by the United 
States, we still have faith in the good old fighting blood in the 
average American citizen. 

Mrs. Upton Sinclair is about to marry her ideal man, who 

is an idler with a comfortable income. Judging by the different 
types of ideal men of modern women, they're a pretty poor 
specimen of real manhood. 

Those New York school teachers who spelled payroll 

"payrole" are likely to be looking for another role to occupy 
before long, judging by the temper of those in charge of the 
personnel of the teachers' payroll. 

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat says that Congress is 

losing its bearings on both currency and tariff. But Woodrow 
Wilson still has a pretty good idea of where it will all end, and 
we are well satisfied to leave it to him. 

Washed money is being turned out of the United States 

government currency laundry at the rate of 30,000 pieces a 
day, and still there are people complaining that they are not 
getting enough of even the unwashed kind. 

A physician recommends that one should eat an onion 

every day, and then is so thoughtless as to forget to suggest 
the proper hour at which it should be eaten. But then most of 
us know the right time for the other fellow. 

Evidently Chicago is looking forward to the arrival of 

universal woman's suffrage by starting a school for teaching 
men to sweep. But the vacuum cleaner will come as a great 
boon to a lot of them who prefer their clubs to housework. 

One hundred and three is what the thermometer registers 

in the Middle West, and they're dying of heat in the East. San 

Francisco seems to be about the best old place after all, even 

some of its policemen try to make it appear otherwise. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 




E/DITOR.IAD 



With the passing of the Insurance 
Declare Sick. Law in England, which to all in- 

tents and purposes is the counter- 
part of the Workmen's Compensation Law in California, mem- 
bers of the trades unions and the lazy, unemployed throughout 
the country have developed a propensity for "declaring sick," 
thus demanding compensation by virtue of the Act. 

The trades union movement in England is threatened with 
the most serious and critical situation in the history of labor. 
The surprising increase in sick claims has leached the point 
where even tne unions are realizing the dangers, and are con- 
templating investigations to ascertain whether the evil can 
be remedied before it goes beyond control. 

As the News Letter has heretofore pointed out, the trouble 
with the Insurance Act in England offers a warning to the peo- 
ple of this State. We have insisted that the passing and en- 
forcement of the Workmen's Compensation Act in California 
is an out and out encouragement of malingering. 

The impulse given to those among the laboring people whose 
morals are not so strict as to stand in the way of their obtaining 
a living at the expense of the other fellow is to "declare sick" 
and demand compensation. 

The bill encourages the exaggeration of injuries and the con- 
sequent danger of the crippling of business by unjust and exor- 
bitant demands upon the institutions of the country for the pay- 
ment of workmen's compensation. 

The General Federation of Trades Unions in England has 
been compelled, owing to the indignation publicly expressed, 
to use its efforts to assist the government in its present diffi- 
culty. The employers of California are asking for a referen- 
dum election, and it is the duty of all who are opposed to the 
encouragement of malingering to give their assistance in the 
defeat of the unjust and utterly unreasonable compensation bill 
which the Johnson administration has attempted to foist upon 
the people for the purpose of strengthening its political 
machine. 




Choosing a Career. 



The President of the University of 

Illinois the other day addressed 

three hundred women graduates, 

and in doing so advised them as to the choice of a career. Of 

course in these days of suffragette activity the professor's ideas 

will not possibly meet with particularly enthusiastic approval. 

The advice given the three hundred students was to get 
married. "The woman who chooses this career," said the pro- 
fessor, "when the opportunity offers itself or when she makes 
it for herself, as every woman can, is choosing a highway to 
social service which is far ahead of all teaching, or legal or 
medical service she can possibly render to society." 

The learned gentleman might well have gone further and 
included political service as being secondary to the career of 
wife and mother. That he did not is, of course, possibly due 
to the fact that he even did not expect to be too well received 
as far as he went. Women love the limelight these days, and 
the career of marriage is one they do not all seem particularly 
infatuated with. 

But just a word to you women who are daily following some 
endeavor in some perfectly conscientious cause for the better- 
ment of police courts and like good purposes. Sit down and 
think it over, and see if you are not willing to admit that the 
President of the University of Illinois was very, very o?9?e to 
the truth. If women would only think it over, though ! 



Another Independence Day com- 
Reflect. memoration has been added to the 

history of the United States. Once 
more has the drum beat sounded from coast to coast, and once 
more have Americans thrilled at the thought of all which the 
celebration of the Fourth of July means to themselves and to 
civilization. 

We are proud of what "Old Glory" has always stood for in 
the past, and we have reason to be proud of the achievements 
which have marked the growth of our nation from the first In- 
dependence Day to that of yesterday. 

Once a puny and despised colony on the Atlantic seaboard — ■ 
to-day, one of the greatest among a galaxy of mighty world- 
powers. It is a record of which we may well be proud. Yet, 
we would be small indeed were we not, at the same time, to 
reflect. 

We have raised the accomplishment of government of the 
people to the status of nothing less than a marvel. Yet we 
have but begun. We are but on the verge of the attainment of 
a freedom of democracy which will startle the universe no less 
than has our rapid rise up to the present. 

Yesterday, we thrilled to the fervor of patriotic addresses 
from Atlantic to Pacific. To-day, has come the seriousness of 
reflection. It is well that we do not permit our patriotic enthu- 
siasm to cause us to lose sight of what we owe ourselves and to 
future Americans in the attainment of the Newer Freedom 
which is now under way at Washington. 

There are those who scoff at the doctrine of freedom which 
is being preached by President Wilson. But the principles are 
right, and we must face the facts. They are principles which 
are the very essence of the democracy which should be ours if 
we would reach the final climax of earthly freedom. And we 
owe it to our country to do our utmost toward their fulfillment. 

Although we delight to sing the praises of this land of the 
free on our Fourth of July celebrations, we have but tasted 
liberty. And if we will be truer, bigger and better citizens and 
followers of the flag of our country, we will now put our shoul- 
ders to the wheel, and back our President in his great fight. 

Political democracy is a beautiful conception — so is labor 
democracy. Conservation of our vast industrial and business 
institutions is vital — so is the question of proper protection of 
the rights of the consuming public. 

These facts are things which we must keep ever before us. 
We must unify the principles of labor and political democracy 
and of conservation of our industries, tempered with adequate 
protection for consumers, and then will come a government of 
the wise and the good — wise enough to rule and good enough 
to place the interest of the whole people before any selfish or 
factional interest. Reflect and act upon this one great idea for 
the future conduct of the affairs of our country, and then will 
we be able to celebrate an Independence Day such as the world 
has never known the like. Then will we be truly great. 

There is much for the American people to accomplish before 
they can declare their work of building a perfect republic com- 
plete and beyond question. We must realize this just as we 
must realize how much we have done for civilization during 
past years. 

We have stood in the foreground of nations as preachers of 
the observance of international honor. We must not swerve 
from that policy. We are not so great that we can refuse to 
recognize that besides owing something to ourselves we owe a 
still greater duty to humanity. We must indeed reflect. 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



President Wilson has again demon- 
Proven. strated that he is worthy of the 

confidence and admiration of the 
American people in that he has demonstrated that he is man 
enough to rise above mere political considerations and aid the 
ends of justice. His prompt action in demanding the imme- 
diate prosecution of the Diggs-Caminetti and Western Fuel 
cases has demonstrated conclusively just what kind of a man 
Woodrow Wilson is. We may well be proud of our President. 

In accepting the resignation of former District Attorney 
McNab and dismissing former special prosecutor Herrlngton, 
the administration did only what it was forced to do under the 
circumstances. Instead of rendering the ends of justice more 
difficult and giving rise to the possibility of the failure of the 
prosecution, the federal government has given assurance that 
nothing shall be permitted to stand in the way of rigid prose- 
cution. If Judge Herrington and former prosecutor McNab 
are both as serious as they pretend, and so fearful lest this new 
change in the office of the district attorney will be a benefit to 
those concerned in the two prosecutions in question, there is 
nothing to prevent them rendering the assistance of their special 
knowledge of the facts in the cases. 

It has been hinted that McNab hopes to be the Republican 
candidate for Governor in the next election, and that he chose 
this opportunity of climbing into the limelight. Perhaps the 
rumor is correct — we do not know nor do we care. We admire 
him if he was sincere in his demand that political or financial 
influences should not be allowed to stay justice — and we feel 
satisfied as to Mr. McNab's integrity in that direction. As to 
Judge Herrington, it is well known that he is an active worker 
in moral reforms and rather inclined to bubble over in the heat 
of what is not at all times the best of logic and common sense. 
His denunciation of the administration cannot injure it very 
appreciably. But he can, if he is really serious, be of assist- 
ance to the new department in Northern California by giving 
them the benefit of his knowledge of the Diggs-Caminetti affair. 
And it is up to him to dc so. 

In the meantime, the News Letter is more satisfied than ever 
that the American people need have no fears as to the deter- 
mination of the President to at all times so conduct himself as 
to merit the respect and admiration of the entire nation. 

The appointment of Thomas Nelson 
Diplomatic Page as Ambassador to Italy will 

Appointments. meet with nation-wide approval be- 

cause of the character and calibre of 
the man who is to represent this country at the Court of King 
Emmanuel. 

Mr. Page, besides being an author, is a man of great culture. 
Although such a statement may appear paradoxical, it is 
nevertheless apt because so many of our modern authors are 
so far from culture that it is often a wonder that they can suc- 
ceed in finding publishers. Mr. Page is a true representative of 
the refined and cultured South, besides being a true American. 

President Wilson's efforts to obtain for the United States 
representatives whose merits rest upon real worth and the other 
requisites of those who mingle where culture predominates, are 
certainly to be commended, and his choice of Thomas Nelson 
Page could not be bettered. 

Mr. Page, besides being a man of letters, is a progressive of 
pronounced views, and of the very best type. His appointment 
is therefore one which will be received with approval by every 
political faction in the country. His progressiveness has been 
broad enough not to make enemies, and of the kind which is 
to be admired. It is a pity that there is not more of it among 
the public men who call themselves progressive. 



Fears are being expressed, so it is 

Our Newest Citizen. rumored, that Woodrow Wilson will 

soon resign his position as President 

of these United States, and hurry to some far off land where 

he may never be seen by friend or foe or fellow-countryman. 

On Sunday evening last, after a momentary burst of hand- 
clapping had caused him to pause in the course of a sermon 
which at times had made his hearers laugh gaily, the Rev. Dr. 
Charles F. Aked declared that it was infinitely disappointing 
to him and immeasurably sad that President Wilson had failed 
to act other than he did in the matter of the Diggs-Caminetti 
case. 

To listen to the reverend gentleman and to hear the laugh- 
ter and the handclapping on that occasion made one almost be- 
lieve that he had made a mistake in thinking he had entered 
the House of God. But then, Dr. Aked is one of those gentle- 
men who loves the spot-light, and therefore must glory in ap- 
plause. 

Refusing to consider the evidence, which proves that, despite 
any charges that there had been ulterior influences at work in 
connection with the delay in the prosecution of the young men 
charged with white slavery, the President has proven that he 
was on the side of justice, and that he insists, as a true Ameri- 
can, that favoritism should not and could not be shown, Dr. 
Aked said Woodrow Wilson falls short of his conception of a 
real man. 

Of course Dr. Aked, until recently, was not an American citi- 
zen. He became such by a method of reconstruction known as 
naturalization. And it seems that the influence of the recon- 
struction has been anything but refining. 

What men like Clayton Herrington and Dr. Aked consider 
to be the proper attitude of a public man is, of course, unlikely 
to have much influence upon the future government of this coun- 
try or the conduct of the administration of justice. And the 
fact that the House of God was chosen as the place for a nar- 
row, infinitely sensational and immeasurably righteous pretense 
at a moral view of a question which was made unsavory because 
of what has been hinted was a desire for notoriety preceding 
a Gubernatorial election, is not likely to create a favorable im- 
pression upon others than those who applauded in imitation of a 
cheap political meeting. 

To those who have had the opportunity of judging of the 
preachments of Dr. Aked in the past, it will not be surprising to 
know that his sermon of last Sunday night was, as usual, brist- 
ling with generalities without any semblance of effective censure 
of President Wilson. 

To Americans who know the man who is our President to be 
above reproach, the effrontery of our newest citizen will not ap- 
peal as particularly pleasing. It is hard enough to build a 
national structure with native-bom material which is not always 
over-intelligent without having the handicap of additional im- 
pediments such as those who come among us from other coun- 
tries which do not voice any particular sorrow at their loss. 

Clayton Herrington nor the Rev. Dr. Aked have as yet accom- 
plished anything which would at all justify their mention in 
history's pages. Both are seekers after that cheap notoriety 
which wins applause, but which goes no further after they have 
uttered their fallacies. 

We would advise Dr. Aked to remember that the church is 
intended to be for the praise of God and for that teaching 
which will elevate man above the sordid. And the sordidness of 
an unjust and sensational attack upon the President of the 
United States by a young and inexperienced citizen is des- 
picable to say the least 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



THE NEW FREEDOM! 

PRESIDENT WILSON AGAIN APPEARS BEFORE CONGRESS AND APPEALS 
FOR SUPPORT IN BRINGING ABOUT FREEDOM OF ENTERPRISE 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 
President Wilson again personally delivered his message to 
Congress in urging the immediate action of that body in the 
matter of currency reform. Speaking of the efforts of the Ad- 
ministration up to the present, the President referred to the fact 
that the government of the United States was about to set free 
the business raen of the country. 

The first great step towards the eventual consummation of 
commercial freedom in these United States which have so 
long been under the burden of a protective tariff and an in- 
efficient currency and banking system, has been made by 
President Wilson and the Democratic administration. And 
this latest message of the President is but in keeping with the 
promise made by him in his inaugural address on the day of 
his formal acceptance of his high office. Woodrow Wilson 
promised to bring to the American people, as far as it lay with- 
in his power, a new freedom. 

And Woodrow Wilson is making good. He is demonstrating 
that his assurances were not those of the professional politi- 
cian, but of the New Emancipator, who has taken the greatest 
gift the people can offer a citizen with the realization that he 
must be true to his duty to them and to the nation. 

By virtue of the Democratic proposals with reference to the 
tariff, the people are assured that at last they are to 'be re- 
lieved of that which has caused them, the consuming public, to 
bear the burden of the artificial stimulation which has hereto- 
fore bolstered our industries at the expense of efficiency and 
competition. The people have learned that protective tariffs 
have caused the unreasonable advance in the cost of commodi- 
ties to them. And they have also learned that that evil is to 
be removed and business placed upon the level it should be — 
the level of a legitimate struggle for competitive supremacy, 
which is the only just stimulus to trade and commerce. 

Regarding the much needed reform of our currency and bank- 
ing laws in order to perfect our new commercial freedom, the 
President in his message to Congress said : 

"The country has sought and seen its path in this matter 
within the last few years — sees it more clearly now than it 
ever saw it before — much more clearly than when the last leg- 
islative proposals on the subject were made. We must have a 
currency, not rigid as now, but readily, elastically responsive 
to sound credit, the expanding and contracting credits of every 
day transactions, the normal ebb and flow of personal and cor- 
porate dealings. Our banking laws must mobilize reserves; 
must not permit the concentration anywhere in a few hands of 
the monetary resources of the country or their use for specula- 
tive purposes in such volume as to hinder or impede or stand 
in the way of other more legitimate, more fruitful uses. And 
the control of the system of banking and of issue which our new 
laws are to set up must be public, not private, must be vested 
in the government itself, so that the banks may be the instru- 
ments, not the masters of the business and of individual enter- 
prise and initiative." 

It is the duty of every member of Congress and of the Sen- 
ate to render the President assistance in the fulfillment of those 
objects. Congress and the Senate have too long been uncon- 
cerned about the real welfare of the people, and too much con- 
cerned as to the demands of what they have been pleased to 
view as the necessities of business. 



There are those who sneer at President Wilson's "New Free- 
dom," but they are powerless to stem the tide of advancement 
which a realization of what it means has brought the American 
people to demand. 

We Americans are pleased to call ourselves free because we 
have been taught to believe it by reading the American Consti- 
tution. But we cannot ever be truly free so long as we remain 
hampered by the lack of the "best and most accessible instru- 
mentalities of commerce." The reform of the tariff and of the 
currency laws of the country as outlined by the President pre- 
sent those proper instrumentalities which former governments 
have denied to the people. 

We have rejoiced at the prosecution of so-called monopolies 
which have combined for the restraint of trade and the purpose 
of enabling their stockholders to receive enormous dividends 
at the expense of the consuming public. 

Yet, as President Wilson stated in his message, we have 
gotten rid of one kind of monopoly and allowed ourselves to 
childishly remain in the grip of another and more effective 
kind. This is because we have overlooked the fact that the 
"tyrannies of business lie within the field of credit." 

Hence, it is the duty of every American citizen to see to it 
that his member of Congress or of the United States Senate 
stands behind the President in his demand for new and better 
currency and banking laws, just as it is the duty of every voter 
to see to it that the proposals for the removal of the burdens 
upon the people by reason of the protective tariff of the past 
are carried to a successful conclusion. 

w 
THE PEOPLE'S MOOD. 

Referring to the question of the existence of an insidious 
lobby in Washington tor the purpose of defeating the proposed 
tariff reduction legislation, the New York Sun declares that 
obstructive enterprise or filibustering of any sort is something 
"which an overwhelming majority of the people of the United 
States are in no mood to tolerate." 

The people have long witnessed the ease with which, under 
the old currency and banking iaws, the public has been 
"bunked." The treasury of the United States has on several 
occasions in past years been the means of bankers with strong 
enough political affiliations to reap enormous profits at the ex- 
pense of the public. Such things are what the administration 
at Washington are endeavoring to make impossible. And why 
should not the people of the country make themselves heard, 
and thus make known to those gentlemen gathered in Washing- 
ton, who are supposed to be their representatives, that they 
are in no mood to stand any trifling or any temporizing. 

In his insistence upon the necessity of immediate action with 
regard both to currency and tariff reform, President Wilson 
has demonstrated that he is in touch with the people. Those 
who oppose his ideas attempt to make the people believe that 
it is not in their interests that these reforms take place simply 
because of the fact that Wilson is what is called a minority 
President, and therefore not representative of the wishes of 
the majority of the people. But such arguments are but puerile 
means of deluding the public, and it is time to stop it. Public 
opinion can and will aid in the change in government which is 
embodied in the New Freedom. Heaven hasten the fulfill- 
ment. 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 




-One Clayton Herrington created a sensation by sending 



a telegram to the President demanding that the latter cause 
a certain gentleman who is at the head of the Federal justice de- 
partment to vacate his seat. And Mr. Herrington, with the bom- 
bast of the true moral uplifter, accused every man and woman 
of decency in the State of being in league with him in making 
the demand. Of course, if he had been called upon to furnish 
documentary proof he would have been a trifle embarrassed. 
But the real test of any man's right to being called a moral re- 
former in these days is his ability to voice the opinions of 
everybody else without ever consulting them. A certain gen- 
tleman at a recent meeting of the Commonwealth Club at which 
friend Clayton soared to heights of impassioned defense of the 
opinions of every decent man and woman in this State, called 
attention to the fact that there were a lot of perfectly decent 
people who did not quite coincide with the views Mr. Herring- 
ton thought fit to impute to them. And Mr. Herrington made a 
iame attempt at explanation by inferring that they should 
think as he said they did. The fact is, that the State is not 
likely to go to pot simply because it has lost Mr. Herrington 
as a public official. Nor is President Wilson likely to worry 
any more about it. While we may not be able to obtain so 
brainy and enthusiastic a prosecutor to take his place, we may 
some day be able to obtain an efficient one. In t^° meantime, 
we should look about for some nice, glorified place to put a man 
who is so large of brain as to be able, at a glance and in the 
twinkling of an eye, to obtain the views of every man and wo- 
man in California without having to take the trouble of talking 
it over with them or otherwise obtaining it authoritatively. 

In the office of the Sacramento Bee hangs a notice which 

reads in part as follows : "Regard for the feelings of others must 
be regarded in every avenue of news, under any and all condi- 
tions." Fancy hanging that dictum on the walls of the editorial 
rooms of the San Francisco Examiner or other daily news dis- 
torters of like type. Some people will never understand a cer- 
tain kind of human nature — the Bee not excepted. The privi- 
lege of twisting news so as to act as a stab in the back for some 
person who is in the public eye is a delight to the soul of a 
Hearst writer, not because of personal meanness but because 
of the urging of the man behind the pay check. If the San 
Francisco Bulletin could be persuaded to forsake the gutters 
for higher planes, and the Examiner to treat Washington news 
items as at times favorable to President Wilson or Secretary 
Bryan, then would the rule of the Sacramento Bee be one which 
we might hope would be observed throughout the field in every- 
day journalism. Until then — well, no person must have such a 
thing as "feelings." 

After all, it is unlikely if real honest Americans will 

blame President Wilson for being absent from the Gettysburg 
celebration, seeing that he is not even going to take a summer 
vacation in order to keep watch in Washington. That's what he 
is there lor, anyway. 

Frankness in the disclosure of their official conduct by 

the members of the United States Senate seems to prove that 
at least some of them intend making hay while the sun shines, 
and using their franking privilege to the limit in anticipation 
ot the next Senatorial election. 



If the present attitude and agitation against everything 

Asiatic continues, we may look to see in the near future dras- 
I o measures used against the Japanese lantern or the artistic, 
but essentially Japanese, fire screen. Imagine the indignation 
ot some of our pure patriots- upon coming home to find his 
abode sheltering some bronze or Oriental prints showing the 
sacred mountain, Fujiyama, reposing in a sea of monotones. 
Before we can condemn everything Japanese we should be 
able to distinguish that which is Japanese and that which is not. 
The recent "incident" at Hemet, California, where the citizens 
of that town arose in righteous wrath and compelled some fif- 
teen fruit picking Koreans to depart forthwith, under the im- 
pression that they were natives of the land of the Mikado, adds 
some light to the above. As Korea is a dependency of Japan, 
the course of the natives of Hemet will call for some more diplo- 
matic exchanges between Washington and Tokyo. In the mean- 
time, Hemet is studying the difference between the Korean and 
the Japanese from a racial standpoint. 

It is surprising to me that, for the celebration of the 

Fourth of July on the Pacific Coast there has been no town en- 
terprising enough to secure the services of Mr. William Ran- 
dolph Hearst to deliver the Independence oration. With such 
a wonderfully patriotic man at large within our borders, and 
with the menace of the stealthy approach of a foreign power to 
our Western shores, it would seem that the great national holi- 
day would be incomplete without some words of inspiring loy- 
alty from one who preaches it so often from his office in New 
York. Of course, there may be some difference in opinion as 
to the real quality of the Hearst patriotism, but surely we should 
appreciate it enough to wish to hear his silvery voice declaim 
defiance to every flag that blows, and particularly in Califor- 
nia, where we know him so well. But perhaps that is the rea- 
son he does not appear here in such a capacity. 

Undoubtedly we need a wise and strict taxicab ordinance, 

such as that being urged by the Chamber of Commerce, to save 
both ourselves and the strangers within our gates from extor- 
tionate drivers. But no ordinance will be effective unless the 
rates provided by it are posted conspicuously within the vehicle. 
These should also be accompanied by a simple diagram of the 
city, which should display unmistakably the distances for every 
trip. Without such a poster, no ordinance can prevent fleecing. 

"What we need to break the shackles and free those 

slaves of fashion is a leader," declared Mrs. John Boldt, one 
of the prettiest of New York's latest brand of advertising suf- 
fragettes. She spoke from the depths of an easy chair, where 
she gracefully reclined in her corsetless, trouserette costume. 
It was made of sun-burst colored silk, caught in at the ankles 
with a band of gold and hlue embroidery. Nothing plain or 
simple about it at all — that wouldn't do, for the dear sisters 
would not be freed from fashion's shackles for mere "style" for 
anything less than striking plumage. And here we are in San 
Francisco fussing over "slashed skirts" and the like. Why, 
we're asleep. Rise, women, and be free — you will still be able 
to create a sensation, and see the fun you'll have actually wear- 
ing the trousers, instead of figuratively. 

Tit for tat — sugar was placed on the free list in 1890 by 

the Republicans, and on the dutiable by the Democrats in '94. 
But it may be a long time before the Republicans get another 
crack at it after the Democrats get through with it this time. 

It is unlikely that any of Secretary Bryan's callers will 

ever repeat what the Governor of North Carolina said to the 
jovernor of South Carolina. 

New York is as plentiful with mayoralty candidates as 

Mexico is with aspiring presidents. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 




Mutinies in France. 
Judging from the latest developments in France, the mutinies 
and other rather heated demonstrations throughout the army 
against the proposals contained in the three years' service plans 
were not as overestimated as some have attempted to make 
them appear to be. In fact, according to the very latest accounts 
from Paris, the demonstrations all over the Republic were much 
under-estimated, and are conceded to have been the worst 
which have occurred in Europe within modern times. The 
common people are beginning to realize just what the three 
years' service proposals mean to them. The burden has become 
so gruesome in its aspects that they are determined that they 
shall not be forced to bear it. Anti-militarism appears to have 
saturated the army of France, according to leading authorities, 
and it is only a matter of a short time until the people will 
lose all control of themselves and join hands with the army 
in their anti-military demonstrations. That is, of course, unless 
the authorities take warning by what they have had to contend 
with thus far. The result, which, according to certain authori- 
ties in Paris, is that there is considerable menace in national in- 
dependence, and newspapers in London are already referring to 
France as a Russian satrapy which is disclosed in the Three 
Years' Service agitation. 



China and American Recognition. 

Referring to the recognition by the United States of the 
Chinese Republic, the leading Chinese journal, the China Re- 
publican, voices the greatest appreciation of President Wilson 
because of his moderation and wisdom. This paper says of 
President Wilson : 

"He welcomes the assembling of the representatives in the 
National Assembly, though as yet unable to welcome a chosen 
president. He wishes well for every purpose of China in 'per- 
fecting the republican form of government,' but not so much 
as hints that it is his desire that Yuan may succeed in over- 
riding such a government and make himself a one-man power, 
whether called president or called emperor. President Wilson 
hopes that 'all the established obligations of China, which 
passed to the provisional government, will in turn pass to and 
be observed by the government established by the Assembly,' 
and does not desire that this Assembly shall be over-ruled by 
the dictum of connivance of the provisional president." 



Reconstruction of the Balkans. 
According to Mr. Benjamin Marsh, who has resided many 
years in Bulgaria, and who understands the situation there as 
well as probably does any man other than a native, the most 
important task ahead of the Bulgarian people is their economic 
reconstruction. The maintenance of the Bulgarian armies in the 
field, according to reliable authority, has cost them between 
five hundred and six hundred thousand dollars a day, and it 
is estimated that the pensions which will have to be paid to 
the dependents of those who were killed or succumbed to sick- 
ness will amount to more than three million dollars a year. The 
war has cost the Allies nearly four times cheir combined an- 
nual budgets in direct cash outlay, and it is entirely out of the 
question that they will ever be able to obtain reimbursements 
from any war indemnity from the Turks. It :s now realized by 
the Allies that they will be forced to begin at once the reor- 
ganization of their agricultural methods, which are decidedly 
obsolete. Speaking of what the Balkans might become, Mr. 
Marsh says : "They were planning to hold a conference on eco- 
nomic reconstruction during the present year, under the aus- 
pices of the four governments, to consider the following sub- 
jects: Technical and industrial training, agricultural develop- 
ment, public health and housing, taxation and internal com- 
munications. Twenty-five years of military training have placed 
the Allies at the 'front of military States. Half that number 
of years devoted to practical training in the arts of peace, and 
application thereof, will put this remarkable Balkan Federa- 
tion in the front ranks of the industrial States of Europe." 




"SIX" 

OR 

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July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



NOTES FROM CASTLE CRAGS. 
"Soda Creek" was the scene of much gaiety Tuesday evening 
when Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee entertained a number of their 
triends. Supper was cooked out-of-doors; later a huge bon-fire 
was lighted, around which the entire party gathered, narrating 
stories, and having a generally "good time." 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Whittington and Miss G. Whittington, of 
Alameda, are recent arrivals at Castle Crags. 

Perfect in every detail was the dinner given at Castle Crags 
Tuesday evening by Mr. Robert Pardow; the ten covers were 
marked by exquisite place cards. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Treat and their two beautiful daughters, 
Miss Myra and Miss Aileen, are guests at Castle Crags. The 
former is a member of Shreve, Treat & Ecret of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bowman, prominent "Portlanders," have en- 
gaged a log cabin at Castle Crags for the month of August. 

Much enthusiasm was evinced over the "rifle tournament" 
ihat was arranged by the social hostess. Sixteen of the guests 
of Castle Crags took part in the affair, and Mrs. George Innes 
and Mr. Frederick Reade carried off the honors. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Scott, of Berkeley, are guests at Castle 
Crags. 

Mrs. E.,A. Brine and her pretty young daughter are sojourn- 
ing at Castle Crags. 

Mr. Cuyler Lee came up from the city on Sunday to join his 
family at Castle Crags, where they are spending the summer. 

Many interested spectators witnessed the game of baseball 
between the "Mutts and Fools" which was played at Castle 
Crags on Monday and Tuesday of this week. Mr. George 
Innes unpired the game, and many brilliant plays were made. 
Jack Norris won the game for the "Mutts" by exceptionally fine 
pitching. The score at the ninth inning was a tie. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Comte, Jr., are enjoying their sojourn at 
Castle Crags so much that they have decided to remain there 
lor the remainder of the summer instead of visiting friends at 
Shasta Springs, as was their first intention. 

The Charlie Lees of San Mateo, with their three children and 
servants, arrived at Castle Crags Farm on Tuesday of this 
week. They are planning to remain a month at this ideal sum- 
mer resort. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Innes entertained eight of their friends 
Wednesday evening at dinner. The affair was given in the 
main dining room at Castle Crags. A profusion of Shasta lilies 
ornamented the circular table. 

Great mirth and enjoyment was promoted at Castle Crags on 
the evening of the 4th of July by the masquerade ball that was 
gotten up by the social hostess. The Assembly Hall was fes- 
tooned with greens, dotted here and there with myriads of elec- 
tric lights, subdued by Japanese lanterns. Over seventy-five 
of the guests appeared in costume, and dancing continued until 
the "wee small hours." 

Miss C. Hibberd. of San Francisco, is a guest at Castle Crags. 
Among the guests at Castle Crags are Mr. Gustav Gutsch, 
Miss Irma Gutsch, Miss Gertrude Reuter and Miss Elinor 
Gutsch. Mr. Gutsch is a prominent lawyer of San Francisco. 

Mr. L. H. Norris, of Piedmont, made a record run in his auto- 
mobile from Castle Crags to the city. The trip was made in a 
day, and he, reports the roads in excellent condition. 

Mrs. Brine, a guest at Castle ( s hostess at an enjoy- 

able automobile party which was ^'iven last Thursday. The 
outing was to the McCloud R; 



HOVEL DEL MONTE NO! 

Every one enjoyed the Fourth of July golf tournament, which 
is a very popular annual event, as the hotel at this tim 
ways filled with a jolly crowd who enter into the spirit of the 
occasion with great zest. On the evening of the 4th the guests 
of the hotel were entertained by a wonderful display of fire- 
works under the beautiful oaks and pines immediately in front 
of the hotel. 

On Friday afternoon. Mr. Warner entertained the vi 
railroad men numbering over forty people, with a motor trip 
through historic Monterey, up through the Presidio, through 
Pacific Grove by the Ocean Boulevard, past the Pt. Pino 
House. The trip was continued on from there along the ocean 
front down to the old Carmel Mission, returning by way of the 
glorious scenic boulevard and Pebble Beach Lodge. At the 
Lodge, tables were set for forty-two people. 



xmong those present were Mr. L. J. Spence, Director of Traf- 
fic if the Harriman lines, and Mrs. Spence and her mother, Mrs. 
M-Cord; Mr. Charles S. Fee, P. T. M., San Francisco; Mr. Jas. 
H "- s burgh, Jr., G. P. A., San Francisco; Mr. F. E. Batturs, G. 
P. A., Los Angeles, and Mrs. Batturs; Mr. C. K. Dunlap, Traffic 
Manager of Sunset Central Lines, Houston, Texas; Mr. H. M. 
Mayo, Assistant to the President of the Sunset Central Lines, 
and Mrs. Mayo; Mr. L. H. Nutting, Eastern G. P. A., New 
York, and Mrs. Nutting; Mr. A. E. Poston, General Agent Wash- 
ington Sunset Route, Washington, D. C, and Mrs. Poston; Mr. 
R. Sliger, Advertising Manager, M. T. R. R., New Orleans, and 
Mrs. Sliger; Mr. L. M. Allen, P. T. M. of C. R. I. & P., Chicago, 
111.; Mr. I. M. Scott, G. P. A. of Portland, Oregon, and Mrs. 
Scott; Mr. J. H. A. Parsons, G. P. A. of the M. T. R. R., New 
Orleans, and Mrs. and Miss Parsons; and Mr. R. F. Wilson, 
Advertising Manager, San Francisco. 

After the dinner was served, every one enjoyed themselves 
with dancing and singing and sitting around the huge open fire- 
places in the Lodge, returning by brilliant moonlight to the 
hotel about eleven o'clock. 

Mr. C. H. Whitehead, a prominent banker of Kansas City, 
Mo., with Mrs. Whitehead, their two sons and Mrs. Charles 
Cooper, were guests at the hotel for several days. 

Mrs. James L. Brainard, with her child and nurse, are regis- 
tered here from Springfield, 111. Mrs. Brainard is an enthusias- 
tic golfer, and will remain here during the summer. She will be 
joined by relatives later on. 

The Misses Friest, of San Francisco, arrived on Saturday for 
a visit of a month or more. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor, of Pacific Grove, entertained at a de- 
lightful tea in honor of Miss Dorothy Foster, who has recently 
arrived from her home in Pasadena. 

Miss Gladys Bowen, daughter of Colonel Bowen, who is in 
command of the Presidio of Monterey, was hostess at a charm- 
ing dinner before the hop on Friday evening. 



CASA DEL REY NOTES. 

Dr. Maupin and family of Fresno have been at Casa del Rey 
for the past week. Mr. A. 0. Warner and his two children, Con- 
rad and Elizabeth, came with the doctor. The party motored 
up from the valley town to play golf, and have practically lived 
on the golf course. They are all experts at the game, and ex- 
pect to be in Santa Cruz for at least another week. 

Mrs. J. C. Wilson and her three children arc at Casa del Rey 
for the month of July. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Larzelere, Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Larze- 
lere and Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Foran motored down from San 
Francisco to attend the opening dinner at the Casino in Santa 
Cruz. The party are regulars at the beach resort, and have not 
missed the opening dinner in years. 

Colonel John C. Kirkpatrick, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. 
G. Macdonald and Mr. and Mrs. Allen Macdonald, came down 
from San Francisco by machine for the opening dinner. The 
genial Colone' never fails to rrake the trip down to Santa Cruz 
to be present at the opening dinner of the Casino. 

Ida E. de Guerre and Miss E. Marion de Guerre are at 
del Rey. Miss de Guerre is an ardent golf player. 



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10 



The 



San F 



AN AMBITIOUS PROJECT 



Offer of More Than One Hundred Thousand Acres of 
Magnificent Irrigated Farms Marks a New Era In 
California's Development 



What is without doubt one of the most unique and high-class 
advertising campaigns ever instituted in this State, or in con- 
nection with any enterprise in any part of the United States, 
has been opened by A. J. Rich & Co., in presenting Solano 
Irrigated Farms, involving more than one hundred thousand 
acres of rich land spreading over the foothills of the Coast 
Range and midway between San Francisco and Sacramento. 

The immensity of the undertaking which has made possible 
this epoch-making accomplishment cannot be fully appreciated 
at a glance. Yet the project is wonderfully simple in that 
those who conceived and worked out the plans have but taken 
■what Nature has offered, and, by virtue of modern ingenuity, 
converted the land into the making of a magnificent garden of 
production. 

Traversing this great tract of land are miles and miles of 
good gravel roads which will shortly be transformed by the 
planting of eucalyptus and elms in double rows lining both 
sides, while every portion of the valley is easily reached by 
the Southern Pacific Railway, the Vallejo and Northern Elec- 
tric, the Oakland, Antioch & Eastern, and the Sacramento Val- 
ley Electric Railways, and deep water transportation not more 
than five miles distant from even the isolated districts. 

Although San Franciscans have the reputation of being firm 
and enthusiastic believers in the destiny of their city, it must 
be admitted that they have had a bad example set them by 
men who make a pretense of public spirit and by the daily 
press of the city. The latter, for some reason best known to 
themselves, have in the past at times acted in a manner which 
has borne the earmarks of a determined effort to discourage 
men of means and energy who have done so much toward giv- 
ing to San Francisco and the State in general what measure 
of advancement is now theirs. In thrusting upon capital and 
upon men who have, by energy, faith and enterprise, built 
the community, the odium of their unfounded distrust, they 
have attempted to hamper rather than assist in the advance- 
ment of city and country. 

Men like Patrick Calhoun, and others associated with him 
in the Solano Irrigated Farms project, are the men who are 
making California and who have done perhaps most to make 
this a great city. Their presentment of this great project is the 
climax of their faith in the State, and their desire to invite 
home seeking thousands to become citizens with us, and share 
in the fruits of the wonderful heritage which has lain dormant 
in Solano County waiting for some one with faith and enter- 
prise to venture the financial outlay necessary to make it what 
it now promises to be. 

The Solano project cannot fail to be appreciated. The press 
should be unstinting in its praise, and in telling the people just 
what an ambitious undertaking it is. It marks a new era in 
California development, and that alone stamps it with indis- 
putable merit. 

That the public realizes that the proposition offered to them 
■without the superfluous bombast which generally characterizes 
the marketing of such an enterprise is genuine, is demon- 
strated by the fact that this week's sales will aproximately 
total in the neighborhood of some $750,000. 

Speed, record-breaking speed, has marked the development 
of the Solano Irrigated Lands project from the moment of its 
inception and the completion of the plans whereby the 450 in- 
dividually owned farms came under the ownership of the com- 
pany, up to the present advertising campaign. And the re- 
sults are apparently all that such a record and the character 
of the lands themselves is deserving of. 

Just a small unit of the vast tract is at present placed upon 
the market, and the work of completing the construction is be- 
ing rushed. 

Work on the big intake canal, which will have a carrying 
capacity of 400,000,000 gallons of water, is about completed. 
This canal is 85 feet wide, 16 feet deep, 6 miles long, and will 
transport the water from the Sacramento River to the great 
reservoirs, one of which covers an area of 250 acres. From 



rancisco News Letter JuLY 5 - 1913 " 

these reservoirs the water will be distributed over the land by 
means of irrigation ditches, most of which are now installed. 

The development of this rich valley will mean untold benefit 
to the State and to this city. The enterprise reflects great credit 
upon those who conceived and have worked it out And A. J. 
Rich & Co. deserve the highest public commendation both for 
their enterprise in the manner of marketing the land and for the 
high standard observed in their publicity. 




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Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




'We obey no wand hut Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

©y Pot! 1 i ~?®tr§<siiu 



"lolanthe" at the Tivoli. 

It is sometimes the custom of our people here not 
to appreciate fine things. I was surprised and even 
amazed to find that the Tivoli was not playing to 
capacity houses, and that there were rows and rows 
of vacant seats. I warrant if it was generally known 
what a splendid performance the new Tivoli com- 
pany was giving of the old Gilbert and Sullivan 
masterpiece they would quickly wend their way to 
the theatre. And it is an excellent performance in 
every way. Staged by Edward Temple, who by 
training and association knows his Gilbert and Sul- 
livan as the school boy knows his alphabet, the re- 
sult is really noteworthy in many respects. It is 
years since we have heard "lolanthe" ..locally, and 
the younger generation are not acquainted with its 
beauties at all. With a multitude of music lovers 
such as live in this city, hundreds of whom are musi- 
cal students, I cannot understand why a livelier in- 
terest is not taken in the reproduction of such a 
classic, as it is a classic of its kind. 

Many there are who claim that "lolanthe" is the 
prettiest of all the Gilbert and Sullivan efforts. The 
book is written in faultless style; in fact, it could 
only be a Gilbert who could write a fairy opera and 
give it a comic asoect. No man to my knowledge, 
not even Bulwer Lvtton, had the faculty of being 
able to weave the English language in such a beau- 
tiful manner. If you doubt this statement, read 
"Broken Hearts," a fantasy written by Gilbert. Ar- 
thur Sullivan, happily, understood the moods and 
ideas of his collaborator, and his delightful music 
interprets Gilbert's words as no other man could in- 
terpret them. The Tivoli right now is doing yeo- 
man service in endeavoring to educate the aforesaid 
younger generation in the traditions and memories 
of the old Tivoli, and bring them to a realization that 
right here at their very door they can see and hear 
the many beautiful things in the musical world of 
light opera done in a manner which is well-nigh 
faultless, and at prices which anybody can afford. 
The entire company is exceptionally well cast, and 
nothing but satisfaction can be expressed at the uni- 
form results obtained. Teddy Webb does the Lord 
Chancellor, and his work is much out of the ordinary. 
Webb understands every role he undertakes, and 
he knows what he is doing. Combined with Ks natural ability, 
the result is always gratifying. His Chancellor is big in 
many ways; an excellent performance. Charles Galagher as 
Earl Ararat is very good: his single solo he does exceptionally 
well, showing off his fine voice to advantage. John Phillips 
does not have an opportunity to shine, but is conscientious 
at all times. Henry Santrey as Strephon again gives evidence 
of his ability as a singer and as an actor. His fine voice, and 
the judicious way in which he uses it. makes it a pleasure to 
watch and hear him. He seems to be a willing worker, and 
thus far he has more than fulfilled expectations. Oliver Le 
Noir has one solo, and his big bass voice rolls out sonorously. 
Le Noir is a much improved actor and singer, and his work 
warrants him being a fixture with the company. Hon Bereere 
does lolanthe, and it is easilv the best thing she has done since 
joining the company. In her one solo she displays her voice 
advantageously, and she has a good voice, too, which she u**~ 
with judgment. Sarah Edwards is fine as the Fairy Queen, 
and her fine contralto becomes a pleasure to listen to. Rena 
Vivienne does not vocally have a big opportunitv, but she is 
extremely artistic and satisfying in everything which she does. 
The two scenes are very fine, and the ensembles show that 
musical director Linne and stage director Temple have done 
their work well. The performance in every way is a musica. 
treat, and reflects credit on the new temple of music. 




Henry Bergman and Gladys Clark next week at the Orpheum. 




Oriental Tavern 

105 Po»ell-IH8 Ellis StrwH 

Most Unique Tavern in 
San Francisco 

Soft Chinese Music 

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Dishes and Chop Suey. 

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Every Friday afternoon a beau- 
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HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



The Orpheum. 

The program this week is really an excellent one; in fact, 
one of the very best seen there for some time. The real artistic 
honors are easily carried off by Miss Sears, who presents an 
act entitled "The Wardrobe Woman." The act allows Miss 
Sears scope for her particular talent, and she shows that she 
can run the entire gamut of feeling. She is also a comedienne 
of more than ordinary ability; in fact, it has been mostly in 
comedy that she has scored her Eastern successes. Edgar Allan 
Woolf wrote the little play, and he has provided Miss Sears 
with an excellent vehicle. There is the mingling of tears and 
smiles, the kind of thing which seems to please the public. 
Woolf is becoming a big figure as a sketch writer, several of 
his best efforts having been seen here lately. I predict that 
Miss Sears will be our foremost character comedienne, assum- 
ing the place held so long and conspicuously by May Robson. 
Miss Sears is worth a visit to the Orpheum this week. Chief 
Caupolican is a genuine Aurocano Indian, and what is most 
interesting, he possesses a wonderfully fine baritone voice. He 
claims to have studied abroad, and this I can believe, as he uses 
rare discretion and judgment in his singing. His various num- 
bers are well chosen, and show his fine voice to advantage. We 
have not had many of his race who have become singers. A 
number of them have been heard of in athletics, notably on the 
baseball field, but Chief Caupolican is a novelty in so far that 
he is really an extraordinary singer, who may yet do some 
great things in the musical world. 

The moving pictures this week show a scene from that old- 
time favorite opera, "The Mascot." It is quite well done and 
proves interesting. Frank Coombs and Ernest Aldwell are 
heard in a selection of appropriate songs. Both have good 
voices, and both are singers of experience. G. S. Melvin is 
another singer on the program this week; in fact, the entire bill 
is close to being a regular musical melange. Melvin, in his 
Scotch impersonations, is very good, and his dancing is especi- 
ally clever. He has a genuine fund of humor, and he literally 
compels his audience to like him. Miss Norton and Paul 
Nicholson present themselves in a clever act. It allows Miss 
Norton an opportunity to show her distinct personality. The 
act is a little rough, and at times borders close on the vulgar, 
but the humor is there, and the audience votes the little comedy 
a huge success, so there you are. Nicholson is a cle\er chap, 
and he aids Miss Norton materially to make the act the suc- 
cess it is. The Gormans, five in number, present a musical act 
which is much out of the ordinary. The hit of the act is petite 
and pretty Katherine Gorman, who proves an unusually ver- 
satile musician, and her cornet work is fine. The act is big and 
proves highly entertaining. The London Palace Girls, about 
a dozen of them, are seen in some very clever dances, and they 
provide a very unique setting for themselves. They are really 
English girls, and they enter into their work with lots of aban- 
don and zest, and a large sprinkling of enthusiasm. As a mat- 
ter of fact, every number on the bill this week has class, and 
the evening is a truly enjoyable one. The Orpheum now stands 
for something in the vaudeville world. In fact, the word 

"Orpheum" means what the mark "Sterling" means on silver. 
* * * 

Pantages Theatre. 

Ruth McKenzie, a San Francisco girl, who is generally 
voted a favorite, heads this week's Pantages bill, and is 
captivating and winning in both appearance and in the manner 
of rendering her songs. The inimitable imitator and impersona- 
tor, Zimmerman, is making a decided hit with his impersona- 
tions of several well known musical directors. He is not only 
clever, but above the ordinary, and deserving of the rounds of 
applause which greet his every appearance. "The Merchant 
Prince," a story of love and commerce, is a refreshing little 
one-act comedy excellently presented by Harry Holman and 
Company. Klein & Erlanger, a pair of circus clowns, furnish 
the big laughter, and Dr. Lorenz mystifies with his demonstra- 
tions of hypnotism upon subjects taken from the audience. A 
decidedly novel vaudeville feature is the act presented by the 
Six Ferris Wheel Girls in their acrobatic stunts on a huge 
wheel. The introduction of their act is made more striking 
by the playing of the "Rosary" as a cornet solo by one of the 
young women of the troupe. Marks and Rosa, billed as a 
society duo, and comedy motion pictures round out an excep- 
tionally good bill. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Orpheum. — Quite the most charming of Jesse L. Lasky's 
productions is said to be his newest musical play, "The Trained 
Nurses," featuring Clark and Bergman, two well-known vau- 
deville players of more rhan usual ability, which will head the 
coming bill. The scene of the comedy, the sun parlor on the 
roof of a private sanitarium in New York City, is most elabo- 
rately and novelly designed. 

Willard Mack and Marjorie Rambeau, supported by a clever 
little company, will present a one-act play of sustained interest 
written by Mr. Willard, entitled "Kick In." 

Professor Ota Gygi, the celebrated violin virtuoso, who is 
making his first American tour, will make his debut here this 
week. 

The Four Le Grohs, three men and one woman, will con- 
tribute a melange of contortion, acrobatic and risley feats. Their 
performance throughout is novel, daring and clever, and sur- 
passes anything previously offered in its line. 

Walter De Leon and "Muggins" Davies, late stars of "The 

Alcazar Theatre ""^ ™ 

Monday Evening. July 7. and Throughout the Week, 

The Alcazar Players in Leo Ditriehs tern's Funniest Far<v-Cunn?rly 

"ARE YOU A MASON?" 
Producing Sixty Laughs an Hour. 

Prices — Nights, 25c. to $1; matinees, 25c. to 50c. Matinee Thurs- 
day. Saturday, Sunday. 

Week of July VI— Return of Bessie Barriscale. For.-st Stanley and Howard 
Hickman. 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottloh, Marx & Co.. Managers 



Corner Geary and Mason Streets 
Phone Franklin 150 

The Leading Playhouse 



COMMENCING SUNDAY NIGHT JULY Oth. First Time Shown Here. The 
Kinemacolor Company of Ameri'ft Presents 

KINEMACOLOR PICTURES 
Animated Photography in Natural Colors Secured by the Sun's Rays Only 
"THE MAKING OF THE PANAMA i'ANAL,' "ACTUAL SCENES OF THE 
BALKAN WAR.- "JAPANESE WAR MANEUVERS," "THE UNITED STATES 
NAVY." U. S. BATTLESHIP AT PRACTICE. " Two Hour Program. Ini 
ing "Travel Talk." MATINEE MONDAY AND DAILY THEREAFTER 
Prices Evening, 25c., 35c. and 5<ic. Mai inees 25c. 

Pantages' Theatre ***** s,r ■ ■ • 

Week Starting Sunday Matinee. July 6th 

"THE GIRLS FROM THE GOLDEN WEST." Corn Younghlood Carson's 
Famous Musical Sextette; VAUDEVILLE'S SWEETEST QIRL8, Adair and 
Hickey in Revolation in Ragtime;" Myrtle Vane and Company in "An 
Obliging Wife;" Ed. Vinton and "Buster" the dog with a human brain. 
OTHER STAR ACTS 

Matinee Daily at 2:30; Nights at 7:15 and 9:15. Sundays and Holidays 
Matinees at 1:80 and :i:30. Night* Continuous From 0:30. 



Tivoli Opera-House 



Phone Sutter 4200 



Sunday Afternoon and Evening— Last times of "Iolanthe.' 
day. July 7th, That Jolly Opera Comique. 



Commencing Mon- 



'PRINCESS CHIC" 



By Julian Edwards. 
Big Singing Chorus- 



Re-appearance of THOMAS C. LEARY. 
Famous Tivoli Orchestra, 



Splendid Cast— 



Orpheum 



POPUL AR PRICES -2nc, , r >Oc, and "c, Pnx Seats gl.rni 

O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 

Phone Douglas 70 
Safest and Most Magnificent Theater in America 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ANOTHER WONDERFUL NEW BILL 

CLARK AND BERGMAN in Jesse L. Lasky's nviv Tabloid Musical Play 
"THE TRAINED NURSES:" PROFESSoli in GYGI. Vlolinisl to thi King 
of Spain; THE LE GROHS; WALTER DE LEON & "MUGGINS" DAVIES; 

CECILE beresford, English Comedienne: the LONDON PALACE GIRLS: 

MISS NORTON AND l'ACI. NICHOLSON; ORI'IIEl'M MOTION PIPTl'RES 

SHOWING CURRENT events. Special Added Feature willard MAi k 

MARJORIE RAMBEAU AND FELLOW PLAYERS offering "Kick In 

Evening prices — 10c, 25c. 50c. 75c. Box seats. $1. Matinee 
prices (except Sundays and holidays). 10c, 25c. 50c 



VISIT THE 



New China Cafe 



CHOP SUEY 



The Largest and most Exclusive Chinese Restaurant In Oakland. 
Oriental and American Dishes prepared under the supervision 
of expert chefs. Merchants' Lunch daily (except Sunday) 

11 a. m. to 2 p. m., 25c and 35c. 

Special Music Quality and Service Unexcelled 

462 Twelfth Street, between Washington and Broadway. Upstairs 

You will find this Cafe Sanitary, Homelike and Attractive 

The moving "Chop Suey" sign will direct you 

W. C. LEE, Manager 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



x Ad 



13 



Campus," will introduce a clever line of original songs, dances 
and dialogue. 

Cecile Beresford, popular in London both in musical comedy 
and vaudeville, who has recently come to this country, will make 
her first appearance here. She will sing character, eccentric 

and popular songs to her own piano' accompaniment. 

* * * 

Columbia Theatre. — Thanks to the remarkable invention of 
Kinemacolor, or motion photography in natural colors, it is now 
possible for one to sit in a cozy seat and see vividly portrayed 
in motion and color, events that have happened thousands of 
miles away. A special and entirely exclusive presentation of 
Kinemacolor has been arranged for by the management of the 
Columbia Theatre, and patrons will have the unique opportu- 
nity of seeing "The Building of the Panama Canal;" "Actual 
Scenes of the Balkan War;" "Japan's Army in Maneuvres," 
and "The United States Navy," and also the "U. S. Battleships 
at Practice," which forms the Kinemacolor program to be pre- 
sented exclusively for a limited season at the Columbia Thea- 
tre commencing Sunday night, July 6th, with daily matinees 
thereafter. 

The Kinemacolor pictures of the Japanese army in maneuvres 
were taken by special consent of the Emperor of Japan, and are 
the only ones of the kind in existence. The presentation of the 
films showing Japan's army at maneuvres naturally calls atten- 
tion to the navy of the United States, as, in the event of a clash 
between Japan and the American Republic, it would devolve 
upon the U. S. Navy to protect insular possessions, the coast 
cities and the Panama Canal. The Kinemacolor pictures show- 
ing the U. S. Navy being reviewed by former President Taft 
were taken by arrangement with the United States government, 
as were those showing the mighty fleet at war practice. During 
the engagement of the Kinemacolor pictures at the Columbia 
the evening prices will be 25c, 35c. and 50c. Matinees will 
be at 25 cents. 

Tivoli. — "Iolanthe," the delightful Gilbert and Sullivan work, 
will be presented for the last times at the Tivoli Opera House 
this Sunday afternoon and evening, and on Monday night, 
"Princess Chic," a jolly opera comique by Kirke LaShelle and 
Julian Edwards, will receive an elaborate presentation. The ac- 
tion takes place in Burgundy in 1468, and the story is based on 
the trouble which arose between Louis XI of France and 
Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, over the encroachments 
of the French King on the authority of the Burgundian. There 
is rollicking fun and a succession of bright musical numbers in 
the three acts, and Rena Vivienne will show her versatility as 
the Princess Chic, while Sarah Edwards will be her faithful 
page, Lorraine. Henry Santrey will be the Duke; John R. 
Phillips will enact Francois, the Marquis of Claremont; and 
the funmaking will be placed in the capable hands of Thomas 
C. Leary, who comes back to the Tivoli after many years; Rob- 
ert Pitkin, Teddy Webb and Charles E. Galagher. Hon Ber- 
gere will have a jolly part as Estelle, and there will be half 
a dozen others in the cast in addition to the big chorus. 

Matinees will be given as usual on Saturdays and Sundays. 

* * * 

Panlages Theatre. — "Girls from the Golden West," a spec- 
tacular and gorgeously mounted musical production, tops the 
new bill opening at Pantages Sunday. Cora Youngblood Car- 
son is the leader of the tuneful sextette, and is a musical solo- 
ist of national prominence. Miss Carson's specialty in her 
latest act is a solo on an immense horn, which completely hides 
her from sight of the audience. The six girls wear beautiful 
costumes, changing several times during the act. "The Sweet- 
est Girls in Vaudeville" is what they call the Misses Adair 
and Hickey, a duo of exceptionally talented and beautiful girls. 
Miss Adair is an exceptionally talented pianist. Her partner. 
Miss Hickey, revels in ragtime songs and dances. Miss Myrtle 
Vane will make her first appearance in vaudeville in Walter 
Montague's bright little playlet, "An Obliging Wife." Miss 
Vane possesses unusual dramatic and comedy versatility. 
Brown, Wood, Barry and Dore, called the "Four Kids," have a 
budget of nonsense termed "Days of Youthful Pranks." They 
sing well, crack jokes and wind up with a dance of the rapid- 
fire kind. Ed. Vinton and an almost human canine, "Buster," 
are one of the best features on the bill. Apparently without 
signals. "Buster" goes through a routine of the most amazing 



tricks, and obeys every suggestion of Vinton without the slight- 
est hesitancy. Harry Fisher and company will present a trick 
novelty cycling act with a lot of humor on big wheels, half- 
wheels and combination trick wheel. Grace Nardini, the lady 
with the accordion, will render a program of ragtime popular 
hits. 

* * * 

Alcazar. — Nothing funnier was ever written for the stage 
than "Are You a Mason?" which is to be the Alcazar's offering 
next Monday night and throughout the week. Although it was 
adapted from the German, and incidentally established Leo 
Ditrichstein's fame as a shrewd selector of foreign material to 
suit this country's less liberal taste, it produces more American 
laughs than any purely-native humorous play, because its char- 
acters and its wit are American and its plot is fairly jammed 
with ludicrous situations. To most folk who keep in touch with 
the theatre, a recountal of the plot of "Are You a Mason" will 
savor of superfluity. Suffice it to say that the action of the 
comedy evolves around the efforts of Frank Perry, a young 
lawyer, and his father-in-law to account for rather late hours 
which they claim are spent in takirg the degrees of Masonry, 
which in reality they know nothing about. The complications 
which ensue are many and full of intense humor. All of the 
Alcazar favorites and specially engaged players will assist Mr. 
Ditrichstein and Miss Irving. The staging will, of course, be 
more than adequate. 

* * « 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — At the next Kohler & Chase Summer 
Music Matinee there will be two artists of national and even 
international reputation. These artists are Madame Yvonne 
Michele, lyric soprano, and Emilio Puyans, flutist. Mme. 
Michele has appeared quite frequently on the operatic stage in 
Europe and America, and has also been unusually successful 
in concert work. She possesses a beautifully trained and ex- 
ceedingly well rounded soprano voice, and both in her interpre- 
tation of song:; and florid operatic arias she proves herself to be 
a consummate artist. Mr. Puyans is a distinguished flute vir- 
tuoso who has been a soloist as well as accompanist to several 
of the world's greatest artists. He is now the first flutist of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 

Madame Michele will sing Gounod's Ave Maria, the Jewel 
Song from "Faust," and a work by Cadman. Mr. Puyans will 
play a Prelude by Saint-Saens, a Chopin valse and the obligato 
to Mme Michele's solos. There will be several exquisite 
musical gems to be interpreted on the Kr.abe Player Piano and 
on the Pipe Organ. 



Exhibition of Important Paintings 

BY AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN ARTISTS 

Including Valuable Canvases by Twenty California 
Painters— Now on Free View Daily, 9 A. M. to 
6 P. M., Until July 10, 1913, in Rotunda, Russ 
Bldg., 235 Montgomery St., Bet. Bush and Pine. 

ARTISTS REPRESENTED : 

Jules Tavernier, Win. Keith. L- BaleMneri. Charles Thi-mas, Von Perbande 
A. W. Beit. Chrii. Jorgewori, Bertha Stringer Lee, G. Cadenaaso, E. Spenrcr 
Macfcy, Alice Be*l. H. Guslavsen, Arthur Becltwith. N. Capulo. E. Cnatr. 
Brocaccio. Rixley. E. J- Lewi*. Dupuy, S. I. Dalten. H. Hols. E. Bertram. T. 
Aoati. LudoTioo. E. W. Currier. -S t heifer. Arnold Schroeder, Well». Delpy, 
Judso». N. Hagemp, Wiflbourg, H Hammantrom. W. A. Coulter, Marion 
Coleman. Heidegger, J. D. Strong and other* of note. 

Catalogues will be mailed upon request to 

W. P. BARRY, Maniger for Exhibitors. Room 115, Rust Bldg. 




KNABE PIANO 

UPRIGHTS $550 up 
GRANDS $750 up 

Moderate Monthly Payments 




Kohler & Cb.se Bldg.. 26 O'Farrell St. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 







Town is quite deserted. The clans have gathered in the foot- 
hills of San Mateo County to witness the golf tournament be- 
tween the Burlingame and the Menlo Country Clubs, and those 
ladies who have not some knight or other upon the field have 
hied themselves to Del Monte to dance and play golf with the 
gilded youths and bachelors who take their holidays in the 
spacious hotel, while those of an artistic leaning are looking 
upon the pranks of the literary colony at Carmel. 

To be invited to lunch with Mrs. Eugene de Sabla establishes 
one at once as "good form." Mrs. de Sabla's luncheons have 
grown so small as to admit only those who are really of the 
inner circle. Mrs. Clement Tobin is invariably at her mother's 
table, and of course the charming Vera de Sabla, who is 
really one of the nicest girls in society. She has a large circle 
of friends, among whom is Ethel Crocker, who returned a week 
or so ago from abroad. Ethel also forms her own little clique, 
which is one of the wheels within the many wheels of the smart 
set. A place in her niche is coveted, because of the exclusive- 
ness of the Will Crockers, and their delightful hospitality, 
which is extended only to those who are clever as well as smart. 
The Crocker family forms a set quite complete in itself, and 
only occasionally is added zest given to it by the admission of 
some notable stranger. 

Beatrice Nichols is immensely popular in almost any of the 
select circles. She identifies herself neither with Burlingame 
nor Menlo, but shows an impartial spirit towards both the 
clubs. With the Cunningham girls it is quite different. Their 
residence in Woodside calls for a loyalty to the Menlo con- 
tingent, and their enthusiasm over their own players showed 
that they learned team spirit from frequent visits to Recreation 
Park. Mrs. Fred Sharon, too, is a Menlo loyalist. She is keep- 
ing open house this week for her friends from the city. Augusta 
Foute is one of Mrs. Sharon's favorites. She is a charming and 
popular girl, and a frequent visitor among the young people 
at the Sharon place. 

© © © 

Speaking of Mrs. Sharon reminds me of Mrs. Stewart 
Hooker, who is welcome in San Francisco after her absence 
of many years. Mrs. Hooker's father was the late U. S. Sena- 
tor Stewart of Nevada, and one time Governor of that State. 
He and his family lived in San Francisco in the South Park- 
Rincon Hill days when Nellie Stewart (Mrs. Hooker) was a 
little girl. Nellie knew Mrs. Sharon when aristocratic San 
Francisco consisted of only those families .who lived south of 
the slot. Senator Stewart was a figure here and abroad for 
many years. He was drowned in the Rio Janeiro wreck that 
took so many representatives of our foremost families. Nellie 
remained with her mother until her death. They traveled ex- 
tensively, and were identified with court circles in Europe. 
Mrs. Hooker has not been in California for many years, but has 
come back to make her home here. 
© © © 

Amy Crocker Gouraud, or Mrs. Jack Gouraud, is certainly a 
remarkable woman. She was always original, with an origi- 
nality that took on international fame. Now we hear of an 
Oriental ball given in Paris, where her entrance into the ball- 
room, in a gown of black and gold, with a jewel covered bodice, 
made the sophisticated French capital recollect the tales told 
by their ancestors of the court of Louis XVI. Mrs. Gouraud 
could easily say "after me the sensation." Sensation has al- 
ways followed in her wake since she was old enough to attract 
attention as the daughter of the late Judge E. B. Crocker of 
Sacramento. The other night she eclipsed herself. Her en- 
trance to the ball room made upon a couch of Oriental splendor 
carried by four stalwart Nubian slaves. She was a modern 
Cleopatra, a vision to stir the blood of the ever vibrant, viva- 
cious Paris. It was not hard to believe that this was the wo- 
man for whose hand men had staked fortunes. One old Cali- 
fornian who was present, amused the guests by recalling to his 



hostess the time when Harry Dam and Porter Ashe played 
poker to see who was to win her hand. 

Harry Dam was a gifted writer, and at that time was secre- 
tary to Governor Stone of California. He had met Amy Crocker, 
who was a belle at the State Capitol. He fell in love with her, 
or at least his fancy was caught by her brilliancy and beauty. 

But Porter Ashe, the clever, fascinating and charming at- 
torney, was also a suitor of the California belle. They met at a 
club in San Francisco one night and talked matters over quietly 
It was decided to play a game of poker on the train from San 
Francisco to Sacramento, and that the loser should gracefully 
step out and give a clear field to his rival. 

Ashe won. He and Amy married. They made their home 
in Van Ness avenue in a house that was in those days consid- 
ered a palace. Then she and Porter quarreled — a clash of 
temperaments — and she secured a separation. 

Next came a sensation that was almost too much for even 
Amy. Porter Ashe, it was reported, kidnaped their child. Next, 
Amy is said to have paid him $100,000 for their daughter's re- 
turn. But whether there is any truth in the report or not, the 
daughter remained with her mother until her marriage. 

In the meantime, Amy Crocker was having h few matrimonial 
experiences of her own. She married Harry Gillig, a bon 
vivant and debonair Eastern clubman, but found him wanting. 
She divorced him, and not so many years ago became Mrs. Gou- 
raud. Also, she wrote several books that expressed her un- 
bounded love of the East. The remarkable part of the whole 
thing is that Amy Crocker has retained, through all her vast 
experiences, her social position and her love of excitement 
© © © 

Mrs. Anita Baldwin McClaughery, who has brought a change 
of venue against her husband, Hull McClaughery, for kidnaping 
their two children a few weeks ago, is not generally known as 
a patron of the arts. Poor Anita has been so misrepresented 
by the daily press that people have the habit of looking upon 
her as some sort of freak of nature, who goes about with her 
opera coat wrap turned inside out to show the ermine lining, 
and wears diamond earrings for breakfast, while the lady is, 
in fact, as sweet and unassuming and as simply dressed a per- 
son as one has occasion to meet in fashionable hotels and 
smart homes and resorts. 

Mrs. McClaughery's new home in Los Angeles is going to 
be one of the most magnificent in "Millionaire Row." And it 
is also going to be one of the most artistic. She has gone a long 
way to give it the proper atmosphere for a home set in the 
heart of a reclaimed desert, and one of the cleverest things she 
has done has been to send for Maynard Dixon to do her in- 
terior decorating. 

© © © 

Speaking of talented Californians, it is interesting to note 
that Charles Kenyon has recently returned from Los Angeles, 
where he has been consulting Nat Goodwin about a new play 
which he is writing. Those who have heard it read seem to 
think favorably of the plot, although there is a wide departure 
between it and "Kindling." 



BLACK & WHITE 



SCOTGH WHISKY 



The Highest Standard at Quality 



• 



ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front St., San Francisco 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Hymen seems to have been very dilatory this week, although 
June is the month of marriages. Only one important wedding 
so far is upon the social register. It was that of Miss Ethel 
Hatch and Lieutenant William Rucker, Second Field Artillery. 
The bride is an Illinois girl and came all the way West to wed 
the popular officer. She is the daughter of Mrs. Charles B. 
Hatch, of Champaign, 111., and her family is well known in 
that part of the country. She recently graduated from Smith 
College. The marriage took place at Marlborough Hall, in the 
apartments of Mrs. Lewis H. Rucker, the groom's mother, on 
Tuesday night. The Rev. Hermitage, of Grace Pro-Cathedral, 
officiated. There were none but relatives present. The wed- 
ding date was originally set for September, but orders from 
Washington, sending Lieutenant Rucker to the Philippines, 
caused the young couple to decide to take the trip together, and 
to spend their honeymoon in the tropics. 

Lieutenant Rucker has been stationed at the Presidio for the 
past year or more. He is the son of the late General Lewis 
H. Rucker, and a nephew of the late General C. G. Hennessey. 
On account of his uncle's death a month ago the wedding was 
characterized by utmost simplicity. The bride was given in 
marriage by her mother, who accompanied her to the coast. 



INTERESTING ART EXHIBIT. 

Great interest is being taken in what is perhaps one of the 
finest collections of paintings in San Francisco, which is now 
on exhibition in the rotunda of the Russ Building, 235 Mont- 
gomery street. The paintings represent some of the best work 
of American and European artists, also a number of valuable 
canvases by twenty leading California artists. Landscapes, 
marines, portraits and animal studies constitute the collection. 
A notable painting is one by Bertha Stringer Lee, of the San 
Francisco Waterfront, and another is a forceful composition, 
The Sea, by that great New York marine painter, Charles 
Thomas. The best local productions are those by Spencer 
Mackay, A. W. Best, Jorgensen, Hammerstrom, Lee, Alice 
Best and Cadenasso. Jules Tavernier is represented through 
half a dozen superb canvases. 



The life and gaiety of San Francisco are nowhere better 

exemplified than by the after-theatre crowds which flock each 
evening to Techau Tavern, where, in an environment of refine- 
ment and respectability, they may enjoy a menu which is per- 
fect, service of unequaled excellence, and music of a far higher 
order than is common in cafes. Moreover, while the Tavern is 
almost nightly filled to capacity, one is never over-crowded, and 
the lofty ceiling insures perfect ventilation. Quite as popular 
among the ladies when on a shopping tour, the Tavern presents 
a most attractive scene each afternoon, and the many beautiful 
souvenirs which it is the custom to distribute add greatly to 
the pleasure of the guests. 



ALL SUMMER RESORTS 
serve Italian-Swiss Colony wines. Call for their fine table 
wine, TIPO (red or white), GOLDEN STATE, Extra Dry 
California Champagne, or ASTI ROUGE (Sparkling Bur- 
gundy.) 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

Tea served in Tapestry Room 
from four to six o'clock 

Special Music Fixed Price 

A DAILY SOCIAL EVENT 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Fireproof 



Rates $1.00 and up 
F. J. McHENR Y, Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

THIRTEENTH AND HARRISON STREETS. Oakland, California 
Absolutely fireproof Class A construction. Erected 
at a cost of $2,000,000. Perfect service and un- 

surpassed cuisine. Afternoon tea from 4 until 

6 o'clock. Music. 

European plan only Tariff $1.50 per day up 

Under Management of VICTOR REITER 
Electric Bus Meets All Trains 




Scientific Treatment 
A SCALP 

FACIAL 

MANICURING 

166 GEARY ST, 
Phone Douglas 977 SAN FRANCISCO 



Dr. Agnew, rectal OlaeaaM, Pacific Building, 4th and Market streets. 



BUTLER-NELKE 
ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ART 

Alcazar Theatre Building: 

MIRIAM NELKE - Director 

Dramatic Art, Elocution, Dialect, Literature, French, 

Fencing, Dancing and Make-up. Fall term begins Aug. 11th 



CASTLE CRAGS 



Under same management as Hotel Del Monte. 

On main Oregon automobile highway and S. P. R. R. 

In the yellow pine forests of the Upper Sacramento River. 

Wonderful summer climate; bright warm days and coolnights. 

Beautiful trails through the shady forests for pedestrians or 
riding parties. 

Plenty of gentle horses and good guides. 

Automobiles for hire. 



The motor ride through 20,000 acres of virgin yellow pine 
forests is unequaled in California. 

Arrange your motor trips so as to stop over at CASTLE 
CRAGS for a day or two. Garage for automobiles; 
gasoline and oils. 

Rates: $18 to $.24 per week. 

For beautifully illustrated folder and reservations, address, 
MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS, CALIFORNIA. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
DAVIS-GIBSON. — One of the early fall weddings will be that of Miss Re- 

becca Davis and Rose Clark Gibson, whose betrothal was recently 

annou iced. 
ROBINSON -GOODWIN.— The wedding of Miss Elena Robinson, daughter 

of Mrs James Robinson, and James Willis Goodwin, will take place 

the first week of August at the Robinson home near Redwood City. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

SCHI5I/LER-RU'J i.Kf »GE —The engagement was announced this week 
of Miss Genevievi Scheller, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. L. C. Scheller, 
of Los ': g ■ s, and John l >. Rutledge, a local attorney. 

VOGEL-FLiETCHER, The engagemeni of Mrs Dessa Vogel and P. K. 

Fletcher was a meed when the Royal Mall liner Moana sailed for 

the Antipodes last week. 

WEDDINGS. 

GREENEBAUM- HERSHBER' f.— Miss Alice Greenebaum, daughter of 
Jacob Greenebaum, this city, and J. U Hershberg, of Dawson, V. T., 
were married on Saturday, Juni 28th, at Skagway, Alaska, 
rIATCH-Rt'CKER.— At a prettj ceremony held In Marlborough Hall, Miss 
Ethel Hatch, the daughter of Mis. Charles B, Hatch, of Champaign, 
111., became the bride of Lieutenant Wm. H. Rucker, Second Field 
Artillery, U. S. A. 

HENDERSON-HAMILTON. Miss Lilllai Henderson and Burnett Hamil- 
ton were married on Wednes ■■- June 25th, ;it Westminster 
Church, on Webster and Page stret ts. 

LEVY- SIMON.— On Sunday evening, June 29th, Miss Carolyn Levy, 
daughter of Mrs. Minnie Levy, 1106 Fulton street. San Francisco, and 
Mr. Albc-rt Simon, a young San Francisco business man, were united 
in happy wedlock. The ceremony was witnessed by the immediate 
relatives of the bride and groom, after which a supper was enjoyed, 
the happy young couple leaving on the night train for a few weeks' 
honeymoon in the South. The presents were many and beautiful. 

McCANN-NEWSOM. — : A wedding of interest to municipal and musical 
circles took place at 1:30 o'clock July 29th at the Mission Dolores 
Church, when G. W. Newsom, son ol former Board of Works Commis- 
sioner William A. Newsom. was married to Miss Elizabeth McCann. 
a talented young musician of the Mission. 

sciii'lz-lt'XDBLAI >.— a pretty wedding took place Wednesday evening, 
June 25th, at 7 o'clock at St. Andrew's Lutheran Church in Union 
street, when Miss Helen A. Schulz became the wife of Arthur Lund- 
blad. 

TOFANELLI-KORN. — A pretty wedding took place at -the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. S. Tofanelli when their daughter. Emma, was united in 
marriage with M. B. Korn, a prominent newspaper man, Saturday 
morning, June 28th. 

WILLIAMS-MUELLER.— Miss Mary H. Williams and Otto Mueller sur- 
prised their friends by marrying -quietly last week. 

WILLIAMS-TUNNEY. — The marriage of Edwin C. Tunney and Mrs. Rose 
Williams took place at high noon on June 16th in the Palm Court 
of the Palace Hotel. 

WOOD-HARVEY. — The wedding of Miss Anna Mill i Wood and Frederic 
Harvey was celebrated quietly June 26th at I o'clock In All Souls' 
Chapel in Berkeley. Rev. Mr. Hodgkln officiated. 
LUNCHEONS. 

MARVIN.— Mrs. Harvey Marvin was hostess ai o luncheon at her home in 
Clay street recently. The affair was given as a compliment to Miss 
Dorothy All- n. 

MAMMON. — Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon was hostess l1 a luncheon at her 
home In Washington street Thursday. 
TEAS. 

BARBER. — Mrs. Edward Barber was hostess at a bridge tea on Thursday 
in honor of Mrs. Charles Philip Boone. 

FOUTE. — Mrs. Robert Chester Foute and Miss Augusta FYmte entertained 
several friends at tea at the Palace on Friday. 

HEWITT. — Mrs. Dixweil Hewitt entertained at an Informal tea June 26th 
at her home in Broadway. In honor of her cousin, Mrs, M. Byre 
Pinckard. 

REYNOLDS.— Mis. Arthur E. Reynolds was hostess ai a tea at her home 
recently, entertaining for Miss Ora Carren and Miss tfae Leddy, who 
are leaving soon for Honolulu. 

WEAVER. — Miss Helen Weaver, the attractive daughb and Mrs. 

C. N. Weaver, who lias recently arrived from the hostess at 

a tea on June 27th at the residence of her parents ,, street, 

in honor of the Misses Eva and Juanita Ghirardi ill ol - lakland. 
DINNERS. 

DORN. — Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Dora were hosts at an informal dinner re- 
cently at their home in Pacific avenue, when members of the large 
De La Montanya family gathered to greet Mr. and Mrs. Howard Crit- 
tenden. 

MARTIN. — Dr. and Mrs. William A. Martin entertained some of their 
friends at a dinner on Saturday evening in honor of Miss Gerakline 
Fitzgibbon and Mr. Ralph Heger. 

SPAULDING. — Miss Claire Spaulding gave a musicale and supper at her 
home in Rockridge, Berkeley, on the evening of July 4th. 



SCOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott gave a dinner at their home 

on Wednesday evening. June 25th, having a - ore "t their friends in 

honor of Senor and Mme. Frederico Alphonse Pezet of Peru. 
THEATRE PARTIES. 
COOK. — Mrs. Wm. Hoff Cook was hostess at a theatre party this week al 

the Alcazar Theatre. 
LEELER.— A box party was given at the Tlvoli Opera House last Satur- 
day night by Mrs. A. Leeler and her sister, who are here on .■ visit 

from Germany. 
REES. — Colonel and Mrs. Thomas Rees entertained several friends at the 

Alcazar Monday evening, later having supper at one Of the cafes. 

DANCES. 

FOLGER.— Invitations ha\e been sent out by Mr, and Mrs. James A. Fol- 

ger for a "barn dance" which they will give at their country plan' in 

Woodside. Saturday evening. July Iflth, in honor of .Miss Lois Cun- 
ningham of New York. 
WILSON.— -Mr. and Mrs Mount ford S. Wilson entertained their young 

friends at a dance recently to welcome their suns, Mountford, Jr., and 

Russell Wilson. 

CARDS. 
ASHE. — At their home in Haight street on lap.t Thursday evening, Mr. and 

Mrs. Thomas A, Ashe entertained at a whist party. 
GIBSON.— Mrs. Waltei D. K, Gibson and Mrs. W. I. Thome were 

hostesses recently ai an auction bridge party, having less than a 

score of guests. 

MOTORING. 
GIANNINI.— Mr. and Mrs, A. P. Giannini .and their, children and ral 

friends are enjoying a motor trip in the South, visiting most of the 

resorts in that part of the State. 
MASTEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Masten and Miss Eugenie Masten are 

on a three weeks' tour of the North. They will visit Seattle, Vancouver 

and Bannf. 
MILLER.— H. M. A. Miller. Mr. and Mrs. Christian Miller and Miss Flora 

Miller will spend the next two weeks motoring through Oregon 
POPE. — Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Murphy and Mr, 

and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton are motoring through the chateau 

district in Europe. 
POTTER. — Mr. and Mrs. Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones of Santa Bar- 
bara will motor to San Francisco this week. 
SHANLEY.— F. P. Shaniey, proprietor of the Continental Hotel in Ban 

Francisco, motored down to Santa Cruz recently, accompanied by a 

party of friends. 
SESSIONS. — Mr. and Mrs. David Sessions and their daughter. Miss Jean- 

nette Sessions, left on Monday evening for a tour of Alaska. 
WRIGHT. — Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Wright and family left Wednesday by 

motor for Lake Alta, where they will open their home for the summer. 
ARRIVALS. 
AITKEN. — Judge John R. Aitken, who has been at Washington, D. C. for 

some time past, returned this week. 
ALEXANDER. — Mrs. C. O. Alexander has returned from a week's visit 

with Mrs. A. H. Small at her cottage at Napa Soda Springs. 
AVENALI. — Mrs. Lorenzo Avenall has returned to town from a short 

visit with Miss Lydia Hopkins at her country home in Menlo Park. 
BALDWIN. — Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Baldwin have returned rrom a visit to 

the Yosemlte Valley. 
BOYD. — Keith Boyd has arrived from an Eastern school, and is with bis 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. George D. Boyd in San Rafael. 
CROCKER. — Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker and their daughters, the 

Misses Ethel and Helen Crocker, arrived this w> ek from Europe. 
FELTON. — Mrs. M. C Felton, the mother of Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale, ar- 
rived on the City of Para from hefr home in Ma/,atlan. and will visit 

her daughter here for a time. 



FOR YOUR VACATION 

FOR YOUR CAMPING TRIP 

HAVE YOUR EQUIPMENT RIGHT 

Thirty-tive years of Progressive Camp Experience enables us to assiM yon. 

not only in the selection of an outfit, but also to adrise "the places to k ■ 

best results." 

Our slnck consists of every practical article required wh'-lh.T ujii ii 

visit the Springs or journey to Alaska, a few of the articles now In 
demand, consist of: 

Tents from $5.00 

Automobile tents of waterproof silk, the very lightest lent 

made, from 7.60 

Blankets (no shoddy carried!) from 2.76 

Khaki shirts from 2.50 

Khaki pants from 1 .60 

Shoes lor men and women from 3.50 

l [aversackSi with straps, from 40 

Government Khaki Coats. 35 and 36 chest measure 25 

Government meat pans, with cup. knife, fork and spoon 26 

Your inspection invited to hundreds of other articles needful U 
The Most Complete Sporting Goods House Id Americi 

THE ELLERY ARMS COMPANY 58 ^ t ^ r e K t ET 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leavea 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely pei fumed powdered leaves to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents in stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
klna, 37 Great Jones St, N. Y. 



July 5, 1913. 



and California dvertiser 



HUNT. — Mrs. Randall Hunt and Miss Florida Hunt returned from Wood- 
aide this week, where they have been visiting Mrs. James Cunningham 
and the Misses Sara and Elizabeth Cunningham. 

POMEROY. — Mrs. Carter Pomeroy, who has been in Portland visiting her 
daughter, Mrs. Scott Brooke, has returned. Miss Harriet Pomeroy 
remained In the North. 

STOTT. — Mrs. John Vandeventer Stott arrived from New York, and is 
a guest for the summer of Mr. and Mrs. Tirey L. Ford. 

SUTRO. — Mrs. Charles Sutro ha^ returned to San Francisco from Europe, 
where she has been traveling for some time. 

SULLIVAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Sullivan have returned from their 
wedding trip, and will spend a month at the St. Francis. 

WEEKS. — Mrs. Alanson Weeks and her mother, Mrs. Harmes, arrived 
from Paris last week, joining Dr. Weeks. 

WILSON. — Mount ford Wilson, Jr., returned recently from Hill's school in 
Philadelphia, and will spend his vacation in Burlingame, where he 
has joined his family. 

WOLFF. — Mr. and Mrs. Carl Wolff returned recently from their honey- 
moon, which was spent in the South. 

DEPARTURES. 

ASHE. — Mrs. Sydney Ashe left recently for Colorado Springs, where she 
will visit her mother for several weeks. 

BANCROFT. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bancroft of Berkeley took their de- 
parture recently for the East. 

BANCROFT. — Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bancroft sailed on the Moana for the 
South Sea Islands on June 25th. They will be absent several months. 

BATCHELDER. — Mrs. George A. Batchelder and Kittredge Batchelder, 
of Menlo, have gone to Deer Park Inn, Tahoe. 

BOARDMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. C. Chauncey Boardman, their daughter, Miss 
Mary Boardman, their son, George Boardman, Miss Dora Winn and 
Miss Ethel McAllister, left June 27th for the Kern River Canyon, 
where they will spend a month camping. 

BREWER. — Miss Amy Brewer left July 1st Cor Chicago to visit her sister, 
Mrs. Edward Cudahy. 

BULL. — Miss Elizabeth Bull and Miss Margaret Carrlgan have left for 
Carmel. 

DEAN, — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dean and Miss Helen Dean left on June 25th 
for Tahoe, to remain all summer. 

FENNIMORE. — Mrs. VV. D. Fennimore and Mrs. H. J. Morton have left 
for Seattle. 

GREENWAY. — Edward M. Green way departed for Tahoe Tavern, re- 
cently, where he contemplates spending the month of July. 

HALE. — Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale and the latter's son, Ensign 
Hamilton Bryan, left on Monday for their country home at Shasta 
Springs. 

KOHL. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kohl left recently for their home. "Idlewild," 
at Lake Tahoe. 

LANSDALE. — Mrs. Philip Van Home Lansdale, Miss Laura Hamilton and 
Miss Josephine Grant left this week for Yosemite, where they will 
spend two or three weeks at Camp Awahnee. 

PEIXOTTO. — Mrs. Edgar Peixotto and her small son and daughter left 
Saturday for Napa Soda Springs. 

PILLSBURY.— Mrs. Horace D. Pilisbury, Miss Olivia I'illsl.ury and the 
two young Pilisbury boys, will leave on Monday for Boston. 

PINCKARD. — Mr. and Mrs. George Pinckard have gone to San Rafael for 
the remainder of the summer, having rented the home of Mrs. Henry- 
Glass. 

PIGGOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. John T. Piggott departed recently for Sacra- 

tneirto, where they win reside Indefinitely. 
SIBLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. John D. Btbley Bailed 01 
cently, to spend the winter In Australia. 

WALKER. —Mr. anl \hs Till... i W.dkrr Left Monday for Santa Barbara 

WELCH.— Mr. and Mrs. Sta. I have gone to their country p 

in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

INTIMATIONS. 
barron. — Mr. and Mrs. Ward Barron will leave the middle "f July for a 

trip abroad In company with their little daughter and two maids. 
COLEMAN. — Mr.s Edward H. Coleman If leaving this week for an ex- 

tended tour of the Eastern cities and the Bununei resorts* 
COOK. — Mrs. Win. Hoff Cook entertained Informally at her home In Com- 
monwealth avenue recently. 
mean,— Mr. and Mis, Walter Dean and Miss Efel Lake 

Tahoe for the summer months. 
HOBAKT.-Mrs. II. N> 11 EXobail and Miss Mary Byre, who sailed early 

in April for Japan. Intending to return In six -j till there. 

] I* U'KINS.— K. \V| Hopkins and a party of friends from New York 
lo Lake i l 

!■! ,t ii id m, , : id tnea U Flood, sflss M and 

Miss I". ii. week for a motor trip through 

Northern California and Oregon. 
McLEAN.— Mr. Bnd Mrs. N- A M. I . . -ir home It' 

Cliff Terra -pending the summer In He!' 

MIl'HLETON.- Mr. and Mrs Arthur Middleton are here from San LMego. 

and are staying at the Pal 
PILLSBURY.— Mrs. Horace Pilisbury and her children will leave next 

month for the East. 
SCHWEKIN - Mr. and Mrs. Uenu I v erin 

will leave this week for Del Monte, w I H ill remain - 

weeks. 
SHBRWOOD. Mrs. and her daughter. Miss J 

wood, will leave the latter part of July for Paso Robles, where 

they will 
SMITH.— Mr. and Mrs. Sydney V. Smith V Smith and several 

friends recently spent a few days at A - -. making the trip 

from town by motor. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene rayne, dentist*, have resumed 

practice at 14« Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 6«. Hours: 9 to 4. 



NOTES FROM WITTER SPRIh 

Witter Springs has planned well for the entertainment of 
guegts over the holidays. The handsome silver cup for the 
auto run to the springs, which is on display in the Shreve, Treat 
& Ecret windows, is attracting a great deal of attention. Res- 
ervations are being made daily for automobile parties. Quite 
a number of sports, games, etc., have been planned for over the 
"Fourth," such as bowling, dancing, swimming, billiards and 
pool tournaments, horseback riding and boating trips on the 
lake. 

Witters Springs is one of the most attractive resorts in Lake 
County, and every one fortunate enough- to stop there is de- 
lighted with the stay, and make mental reservation of a deter- 
mination to acquire, yearly, the ''Witter habit." 



STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF THE 

BANK OF ITALY 

SAVINGS MEMBER COMMERCIAL 

Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 
The San Francisco Clearing House Association. 
JUNE 30, 1913. 
ASSETS 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $5,236,118.06 

Real Estate, Bank Buildings, Furniture, Fixtures ;md 

Sate Deposit Vaults 739,451.14 

Time Loans (Collateral and Personal) 1,114,637.56 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 44,946.26 

Other Assets 36,962.08 

United States, State, Municipal and Other 

Bonds $2,442,540.42 

Demand Loans (Collateral and Personal).. 2,635,431.55 

CASH 1,912,270.43 6,990,242.40 

$14,162,357.50 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Fully Paid '. $1,250,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Pronts 299,068.69 

Dividends Unpaid 30,287.00 

Letters of Credit 44,946.26 

DEPOSITS 12,538,055.55 

$14,162,357.50 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco-. 

L. SCATENA and A. P. GIANNINI, being each separately, duly 
sworn, each f,,r himself, naya thai said i, Bcatena is President and 
that said A. P. Glannlni is Vice-President and Manager of the 
Bank of Italy, the Corporation above mentioned, and that every 

tained therein is true of our own knowledge and he* 

lief. , i. BCATENA. 

A. P. GIANNINI. 

Subsi sworn to befi thl 10th day of June, 1!U3. 

THOMAS S. BURNSS, Notary Public. 

THE STORY OF OUR GROWTH 

As Shows b3 e Comparative Statement Assets. 

DB0EMIIKR81, IWM 8285.436.W7 

DtCKMBER 31, 1105 $1,021,290.80 

DECEMBER 31, 1806 - - 11, 

IH.CtMBEK 31. 111? • J2.22I..117.35 

DECEMBER 31, 1908 - - J2, 57 1,004.90 

DECEMBER 31. 1909 *3,819,2'.7.79 

DECEMBER 31, 1910 - - - $6,53^,861.47 

DECEMBER 31, 1911 - - $8,379,347.02 

DECEMBER 31, 1912 - $11,228,814.56 

JUNE30, 1913 $14,162,357.50 

DIRECTORS: 

3C \ti;na. President A. P GIANNINI, \ I 

DR A H. GIANNINI, Vice- JAS. J. FAGAN, 

Ident Nat'l 

SEO >NtM ' GUASTI, 

in Vineyard P. C. HALE, 
- and Guaatl. Halt Bros., Inc., San F'nclsco. 

.TAMES ki iia/.i. Hale Bros., Inc., Oakland. 

Agenzla Fugaat, F rs mento. 

Inc., Stockton. 
Trans '' [i I. M. H 

Steamship I O. A, HALE CO 

DR nSRl. W C DURGIN, 

Manager Bank *•!* Italy, Los 
\m 

\ A i Kl.l.KKA 

Co., San I 
JAMES C. KAYS, 

.T. WISEMAN M ' 
IACIGAL.UPI, 
and Surgeon, San 
Fram 
-;i< >v \\'\i FEB 

Ven- GB< ». J. GIANNINI. 
A Co., Ven- Presklont ' 

.land. 
- 

& C. Merchant 

■ 

lies. 
VSE. 

■ 

\ZI, 

- 
- 

*de on or before July 10th will earn interest from 
July 1st. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 




A hotly contested race in Army and Navy meet. 



Army and Navy Display Talent 



That the army and navy contain a lot of latent talent was 
amply demonstrated on Saturday last when the first meet held 
by the Northern California division, under Amateur Athletic 
Union rules, took place at the Stadium in Golden Gate Park. 
From ten o'clock in the morning until dinner time the men of 
the services struggled in all forms of track and field athletics, 
and the performances are deserving of commendation. 

There were evidences of crudeness, especially in the field 
events where "form" was at a discount, but the men were all 
keen to win, and there were many displays of gameness where 
men who were hopelessly beaten struggled along to the finish, 
never dreaming of giving up until the distance had been com- 
pleted. 

The mounted events appeared to be the most popular with 
the big cro\vd that attended. Some of the horsemen showed re- 
markable skill, and daring there was in plenty. In the Roman 
race, in which the contestants stood on the backs of two horses, 
with one foot on each, was as startling a spectacle as any one 
would want to see. The three contestants rode their horses for 
a quarter of a mile, and the pace they set was only limited by 
the capacity of the horses. 

Mounted gymnastics by squads of eight men caused many 
thrills, and the spectators applauded wildly as the men made 
pyramids and other gymnastic figures while the horses trot- 
ted along the speedway. 

As an exhibition of quick changing of harness, the pony ex- 
press race was a wonder. The contestants in this race rode 
a third of a mile, dismounted, changed the saddle, saddle-cloth 
and bridle from one horse to another, and, remounting, went on 
their way at breakneck speed. 

The star runners of the meet were Mauldin, Farren and Met- 
calfe. The first-named pair are sailors on the U. S. S. South 
Dakota, and came up from Santa Barbara at their own expense 
to take part in the meet. Farren won the half mile and quarur 
mile runs in creditable time, while Mauldin captured first 
place in the two mile run and second in the mile. Mauldin set 
a fast pace in the two mile run, and won by a long distance. 
Experts around the track were of the opinion that the sailor 
would not be able to last the distance, but the tar had calcu- 



lated his ability to a nicety, and got over the line in good 
shape. 

Farren had too much speed for the other middle distance 
runners, and was an easy winner in both of his events. Met- 
calfe is a sprinter with a good style, but like all the other com- 
petitors in the sprint races, he was slow in leaving the mark. 
This part of the sprinting business the soldiers and sailors will 
probably perfect with practice. 

R. E. Wilson, secretary of the Presidio Young Men's 
Christian Association, who acted as secretary of the meet, and 
Lieutenant Otho E. Michaelis, clerk of the course, did much 
to keep the meet running along smoothly. The officers of 
the Presidio garrison turned out in large numbers, and encour- 
aged the men of their regiments in the events. 

It is planned to make this meet an annual event, and next 
year's gathering will undoubtedly show great improvement both 
in the number of contestants and the standard of competition. 



THE $15 VICTROLA 

FITS IN A GRIP 

Take It To The Country 

The $ 1 5 model is a genuine Victrola- 
only smaller than the wonderful original- 
It will fit in a grip or suit-case — no cum- 
bersome horn to carry. 

Fine for dance music. 

Sherman, jtiay & Co. 

Stein way find Other Pianos Victor Talking Machines 
Pianola Player Pla 
Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



The Seals are struggling this week with the leading club in 
the Pacific Coast League, and the fans are anxiously awaiting 
the test which will show to what extent their hopes of a pen- 
nant winner for this city are justified. That the management 
of the San Francisco club is determined to make as strong a 
bid for the flag as possible is shown by the addition of two new 
players to the ranks, and the announcement that if more are 
needed they will be forthcoming. 

While San Francisco is doing nicely in the pennant race, 
Oakland has fallen into a slump that threatens to put the cham- 
pions out of the running altogether. Against Portland last 
week the Oakland Club could only take one game out of eight. 
Portland played great ball, there is no denying that, and the 
excellent pitching staff that McCredie has gathered around 
him worked at its best, but the fact remains that Oak- 
land's playing was below the standard expected from a club 
that was a league winner last year and had been holding a place 
in the first division for three months of this year. Oakland 
has secured a new player already, and it is probable that the 
owners of the franchise across the bay will not rest until the 
personnel of the club has been changed to a winning combina- 
tion, or the men at present wearing Oak uniforms return to the 
form that gave them the pennant last season. 

Aquatic sports will be very much in evidence during the 
Fourth of July holidays. At Sutro's Baths a swimming carnival 
in which competitors from Honolulu, Southern California and 
Oregon will match their speed against the pick of the Northern 
California swimmers, will hold the attention of those who love 
to watch the "water dogs" perform. On Sunday the Olympic 
Club will hold a race across San Francisco Bay, in which Duke 
Kahanamoku, the Hawaiian champion, and Fred Wilhelm, an- 
other good swimmer from the Islands, will endeavor to break 
the record for the transbay swim made by Walter Pomeroy of 
the Olympic Club. Pomeroy will take part in the race himself 
in an effort to retain his title as champion bay swimmer, and 
also to improve on his previous mark if possible. His clubmate, 
George Bond, will also swim, and Bobby Beck, a youngster 
who made a name for himself by his plucky swim of the Golden 
Gate while he was yet a schoolboy, wiil be a competitor. 

On Lake Merritt the rowers of the bay clubs and the San 
Diego Rowing Club will compete in a series of races under the 
auspices of the Oakland Fourth of July committee. 

The San Francisco Yacht Club will hold a handicap race for 
the Polhemus-Lowe trophy, and the Pacific Yacht Association 
will conduct a handicap race from Vallejo to Raccoon Straits 
in connection with its annual cruise to Vallejo. This race will 
start from the Vallejo Yacht Club house at mid-day on Sunday. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending June 30, 1913, s divldi nd ha 

a to of lour (4) per cenl par all 

-;ixes, payable on and aft< I . July 1. i:,i:i. i 

lor are added to ami bear the same rate of Interal as i u pri : 

July 1. 1H13. H. C. KLB 

Office.— 783 Market street, San Francisco, California. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society (The German Bank.) 
(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending June 30, 1913, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxi 
able on and after Tuesday. July 1, 1913. Dividends nol called toi an 
added to the deposit account and earn dividends from July 1 1913 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager, 

Office. — 526 California street. Mission Branch — Corner Mission 1 L'lst 

streets. Richmond District Branch — Corner Clement St. and 7th \v< 
Haight St. Branch — Corner Haight and Belvedere Sts. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Italian-American Bank. 
(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending June 30, 1913, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and alter Tuesday, July 1. 1913. Dividends not called 
for will be added to the principal and bear the same rate of interest from 
July 1, 1913. Money deposited on or before July 10, 1913. will earn interest 
from July 1, 1913. A. SBARBOHO, President. 

Office. — Southeast corner Montgomery and Sacramento streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Bank of Italy. 

(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For the half year ending June 30, 1913, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1913. Dividends not .called for are 

added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 1, 

1913. Money deposited on or before July 10th will earn interest from 

July 1, 1913. L. SCATENA, President. 

A. PE'DRINI, Cashier. 
Office — Southeast corner Montgomery and Clay Sts. Market-St. Branch 
— Junction Market, Turk and Mason streets. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings Union Bank and Trust Company. 
(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending June 30, 1913, a dividend has been declared on 
all savings deposits at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. July 1, 1913, A dividend not drawn 
will be added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, and earn 
dividend from July 1. 1913. Money deposited on or before July 10, 1913 
will earn interest from July 1. 1913. R. B. BL1RMISTER, Cashier. 

Office. — Market street at Grant avenue and O'Farrell streets. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 
Security Savings Bank. 
(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For Mi,' half year ending June 30, L913, a dividend upon ail deposits at 
the rate of four pit per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be payabl on 
ami aftei Julj i. 1913. S. I.. ABBOT. Vice-President 

-316 Montgomery street, Ban Francisco. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernla Savings and Loan Society. 
(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the six months ending June 80, 1913, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of tin,,' an, I Hit .'-fourths (3 3-4) per cent per annum mi al 

.[.■posits, fvt f taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. July t. in:;, hivi- 

iienris not drawn will be added to depositors' accounts, become a part 
ami will earn dividend from July 1. 1913. Deposits made on or 
July 10. 1913. will draw Interest from July l. 1913. 

67. J. TOBIN. Acting Secretary. 
Office. — Corner Market. McAllister and Jones Streets, San Francisco. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



Most of the golfers will be out of town until Monday. With 
tournaments scheduled for Del Monte, Claremont, Menlo, Beres- 
ford and Burlingame. 



PAPER 



CAMP FURNITURE 




TENTS 
FLAGS 

We make any- 
thing out of 
canvas. 



WEEKS-HOWE-EMERSON CO. 

51 MARKET STREET 



Telephone Kearny U6i Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connections With All Railroads 

M«in Office: 625-6-tT Third Street, San Francisco, C«l. 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 2230 

Private Exchange Connecting All Departments 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 

Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and inspect motors. 

Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



BRUSHES 



623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery Streets 



With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather I'usters. on hand and made 

io order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois- M^rai 

Tollsh and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY. 
Let us guide you In your selections. 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers In 
The Highest Class PAPE K F ° r 0ff,ce stat,oner y 

Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco, Cal. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



"Now, lemme see," said the rural justice, figuring on the 

back of an old envelope, "your bill will come to jest forty-seven 
dollars." "Forty-seven dollars?" echoed Wigglethorpe ; "why, 
Judge, the fine for overspeeding is only fifteen dollars." "Ya-as, 
I know," said the justice ; "the thirty-two dollars is f er contempt 
o' court." "But I haven't expressed any contempt for this 
court," protested Wigglethorpe. "Not yit ye haven't," grinned 
the justice, "but ye will, my friend — ye will before ye git a 
mile out o' town. I've made the fine putty stiff so's t' give ye 
plenty o' room to move round in." — Ex. 



Sherlock Holmes glanced around the room. The pic- 
tures were torn into shreds — the chairs were broken — the table 
lying on top of the piano. A great splash of blood was on the 
carpet. "Some one has been here," he commented with won- 
derful insight. — Brooklyn Life. 

BANKING 



-3*C 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PMd-Ur ctpiui n, ooo.ooo 

Sarplm Mid Undixid.d ProflU 91.600.000 
Tola I Rwourcei 9*0.000,000 

OFFICERS; 
HERBERT FLLlSHHit KK.R Pr«iident 

SIO. QREENEBAUM Clinrnma of th« 8o*r4 
WASHINGTON DODGE Vica-Pretidant 



JOS. FRIEDL1RDIR 


Vic.-Fr* fide tit 


C. F HUNT 


Vie*-Pr«*ideot 


R. ALTSCHTJL 


Ctihiar 


C. R. PARKER 


AnliUnt C**hi«r 


WM. H. HIGH 


iiiliUui CmUm 


H, CHOTNSKI 


iniiuat CnhUr 


G. R. BURDICK 


AiiiiUnt C»»hi»r 


A. L. LANGESJtAH 


SecreUrj 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

HIAD OFFICE. TORONTO ESTABLISHED 1867 



SIR EDMUND WALKER O.V.O..LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Manager 

JOHN AIRD Assistant General Manager 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Aggregate Resource 



$15,000,000 

12,500,000 

246,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 



Th» new Travellers Chequea recently loaued by this Bank are a moat 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are la- 
aued In denominations of 

•10, 120, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Auatrla, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Ruaala, Sweden and 
•Switzerland la atated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
trlea they are payable at current rates. 

The chequea and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldeadorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
Member of the Aaaociated Savings Banks of Sao Francisco 

526 California st., san francisco, cal. 

The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS ONLY- 
MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 
RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere 
JUNE 30th, 1913 

Assets $ 55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 

Employees' Pension Fund 158,261.32 

Number of Depositors 62 134 

OFFICE HOURS: 10 o'clock A. M. lo 3 o'clock P. M.. except Saturdays lo 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits only 



Low Rates East 

Via 

Southern Pacific 

Good on Limited Trains, also on Fast 
Express Trains with Tourist Sleeping Cars. 

Excellent Dining Car Service on All 
Trains. 

Stopovers Both Going and Returning. 

ROUND TRIP 



Baltimore 


$107.50 


Boston 


110.50 


Chicago 


72.50 


Colorado Springs 


55.00 


Dallas, Tex. 


62.50 


Denver 


55.00 


Duluth 


83.30 


Houston 


62.50 


Kansas City 


60.00 


Memphis 


70.00 


Minneapolis 


75.70 


Montreal 


108.50 


New Orleans 


70.00 


New York 


108.50 


Philadelphia 


108.50 


Quebec 


116.50 


St. Louis 


70.00 


St. Paul 


75.70 


Toronto 


95.70 


Washington 


107.50 


and other 


points 



Sale Dates — 

July 3, 4, 5, 8, 9,10, 11, 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 30, 31. 
August 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28. 
September 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11. 

Final return limit three months from date of sale, but not 
later than October 31, 1913. 



Southern Pacific 

SAN FRANCISCO : Flood Building, Palace Hotel, Ferry 
Station. Phone Kearny 3160. Third and Townsend 
Street Station. Phone Kearny 180. 

OAKLAND: Thirteenth street and Broadway. Phone 
Oakland 162. Sixteenth St. Station, Phone Lakeside 
1420. First-St. Station, Phone Oakland 7960. 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



OBITUARY. 

On Tuesday evening, July 1st, Mrs. Edna Snell Poulson, one 
of the founders of the Snell Seminary, Berkeley, succumbed to 
an attack of heart failure. The death occurred early in the 
evening after the dinner hour, at which time Mrs. Poulson had 
been in the best of spirits, and had mentioned the fact that she 
had perfected her plans for spending a vacation with her sis- 
ter, Dr. Margaret Snel|, in Oregon. The latter is the only 
surviving member of the founders of the Snell Seminary, 
which bears the reputation of being the foremost girls' school 
in the West. It was established in 1878 by Mrs. Poulson and 
her two sisters, Miss Sarah Snell and Dr. Margaret Snell, and 
a brother, Richard B. Snell. Only members of the family were 
near at the time of death. Mrs. Poulson was in her seventieth 
year. 



REAL ESTATE BARGAINS. 



The offices of the Goodyear Rubber Company, San Fran- 
cisco, were closed on Wednesday last, owing to the death in 
New York of Mr. F. M. Shepard, the founder and former 
president of the Goodyear Rubber Company. Mr. Shepard 
was one of the best known men in the automobile tire business 
in the East, and was an expert in his line. 



DEWEY'S ESCORT. 



The escort for Admiral Dewey, when he arrives in this city 
next October to attend the Portola Festival, will be composed 
of veterans of the Spanish-American war. Many organizations 
applied for the honor, but Paul T. Carroll, chairman of the 
parades committee, rightly decided that it would please the 
Admiral better to have his guard of honor composed of veter- 
ans of the war in which he won such lasting fame. Among the 
veterans are many who took part in the Battle of Manila Bay, 
some of them on Dewey's flagship, the Olympia. The chair- 
man of the Dewey reception committee of the Spanish war 
veterans is Arthur H. Dutton, formerly Lieutenant U. S. Navy, 
• who served as a midshipman under Dewey on the old Pensacola 
— at that time flagship of the European station. — a. l. d. 



STOCK RANCH 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 1,500 acres 
12 miles from San Jose, two miles from a station, on the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. About 300 acres tillable land, 
200 acres of which is mostly level, and has been sown to 
wheat, producing enormous crops. The balance is rolling 
hills, with a small piece of rough land covered with natu- 
ral grasses, affording abundance of feed during the sum- 
mer months. A creek runs through the property, and 
numerous springs give plenty of water for cattle. 
Improvements are old, but with small expenditure could 
be put in first-class condition. The place has been used 
as a stock ranch, and turned off 250 head of horses and 
beef cattle a year, and if properly equipped, would make 
a good dairy or hog ranch, being close to the railroad and 
markets. About 200 acres would be suitable for orchard. 
Price $27.50 per acre, one-half cash, balance easy terms. 

Address OWNER, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. ]. J. 
Phillips, 12 Geary St., San Francisco. 



EXCHANGE 840 ACRES 

In Yuba County, located about seven miles east of the 
town of Marysville, four miles from the main line of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. This land is all level, has all 
been under cultivation, and is fenced and cross-fenced. 

The soil is of a reddish loam, uniform and deep. All 
valley land — would be desirable for most all kinds of 
fruits, including citrus or would grow alfalfa by de- 
veloping the water. 

2 wells on the place at the present time. Water stands 
within 20 feet of the surface. 

This property would make a splendid subdivision which 
would sell from $125.00 to $150.00 per acre in small tracts. 

Will exchange for Bay property and assume mortgage. 
Price, $55,000; mortgage $16,000. 

Address HEDLEY HALL. 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



FINEST DAIRY FARM IN CALI- 
FORNIA, NINETY MILES 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



ACREAGE 

750 acres (survey shows 787.5 acres), all deep river bot- 
tom sediment soil, less than two miles from a first-class 
shipping point on the Southern Pacific Railroad, within 90 
miles of San Francisco, and 9 miles south of Stockton. 
350 acres are in alfalfa, yielding six cuttings, balance in 
barley and pasture. 

IRRIGATION 

A pumping plant has been installed, equipped with a 

10-inch centrifugal pump, 18 inch steel intake pipe, taking 

water from the San Joaquin River, 40 horsepower electric 

motor, capacity 3,500 gallons per minute. 

A large canal runs through the property, and smaller 

ditches are being completed for irrigation. 

When the balance of the land is prepared, it will be 

seeded to alfalfa. The place will then carry 600 head of 

milch cows, young stock and hogs. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Fine modern electric lighted dwelling. 
Spacious farm-house. 

New ice plant for cooling milk and refrigeration. 
Cow barn, accommodating 400 head of cows at one milk- 
ing, with storage capacity for 800 tons of hay. 
Two new silos, concrete foundations, of 1,500 tons 
capacity. 

Several small barns. 
Blacksmith shop and outhouses. 

Tank house and tank, 42,000 gallons, operated by elec- 
tricity. 

Large weighing scales. 
All necessary implements. 

STOCK 

350 head of fine young milch cows. 
25 head of work-horses. 
5 thoroughbred bulls. 

500 tons of alfalfa and barley hay in the stack. 
At the present time, 750 gallons of milk are being shipped 
daily, with a milking of 250 head. We are in a position 
to contract for all the milk produced at 15 cents per gal- 
lon, F. O. B. railroad station. 

REMARKS 

The place, with only one-half of the acreage under culti- 
vation, is paying over 12 per cent net, and when fully de- 
veloped, at a small expense, will more than double the 
present net income. This is the best acreage investment 
in California, having many natural advantages, cheap 
shipping rate to Stockton and San Francisco, free water 
for irrigation from the San Joaquin River, cheap electric 
light and power, most productive soil, and ideal climatic 
conditions. 

TERMS 

Price, $200,000. $60,000 cash, balance in four equal an- 
nual installments, with interest at 6 per cent. The profits 
of the ranch should take care of the deferred payments 
and development. 

address, HEDLEY HALL, 

21 SUTTER ST., S. F. 

J. J. PHILLIPS, 12 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 






UHNANCIAV 



The American National Bank's 
Conditions Good Here, financial letter says that "Barring 

a certain tightness of money 
which is a world wide experience, and not due to local condi- 
tions, San Francisco is in fairly comfortable circumstances, 
speaking commercially. Both wholesale and retail trade are 
fully up to the normal for this season of the year, and the vol- 
ume of all business, as indicated by bank clearings, is just about 
equal to last year's. Real estate sales recorded in May 
reached a total of $4,661,367, which was $1,421,665 higher than 
for May, 1912. Building contracts were signed last month to 
the amount of $2,Bl7,035, of which about half a million dollars 
was for work on Panama-Pacific Exposition buildings. 

The scarcity of loanable funds will be readily .understood by 
any one who takes the trouble to scan the bank statements. 
While the banks are reasonably comfortable, as regards cash 
reserves, the tendency is toward higher loans and lower de- 
posits, with the result that there is a disposition to curtail 
wherever curtailment is possible, and consequent disappoint- 
ment to many would-be borrowers. Responding to the Comp- 
troller's call, for statement as of June 4th, the nine national 
banks of San Francisco, collectively, showed an increase of 
$3,463,000 in loans, as compared with June 14, 1912, practically 
a year ago. Deposits in the same period declined $4,476,000 
and cash holdings $7,688,000. 

"This condition is not peculiar to San Francisco. In Los 
Angeles, during the same period, the loans of national banks in- 
creased five and one-half millions, while deposits gained less 
than three millions and cash resources declined some two and 
a half-millions. Every financial center in the United States, 
practically, is in much the same situation. Summarizing the 
statements of all the national banks in the United States, the 
Comptroller's published reports show that cash holdings have 
increased only 5.1 per cent in the past three years, whereas 
the total liabilities of the banks have increased 12.5 per cent. 
As cash is the basis of all credit transactions, the strain upon 
credit is obvious from the foregoing figures." 



Harmonious agreement and co- 
Two Chambers Merge, operation on the part of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
with the California Development Board has been assured by 
the election of Mr. Robert Newton Lynch, vice-president and 
manager of the Development Board, to the position also of 
vice-president and manager of the San Francisco Chamber oi 
Commerce. 

The Development Board maintains intact its membership, 
finances and State-wide activities, and by this new arrangement 
receives the hearty support of the work and policies of the 
city organization, thus facilitating the usefulness of each and 
avoiding danger of overlapping. 

The arrangement for the common management of both insti- 
tutions is a cordial recognition in San Francisco of the great 
and direct benefits which come to the city through the efficient 
work of the development board in building up the State. It also 
assures to the State the sympathy and help of San Francisco in 
all the efforts of interior organizations, and marks an epoch in 
city and State co-operation for the development of the re- 
sources of the State. 



Agency for 
San Francisco. 



The desire of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce that the De- 
partment of Commerce establish an 
agency on the Pacific Coast will be 
gratified. Secretary of Commerce Redfield this week an- 
nounced that a branch of the bureau of foreign and domestic 
commerce will be established in San Francisco as soon as funds 
for its maintenance are available. It is probable the Secretary 
will ask Congress immediately that the necessary appropria- 
tion be added to the present urgent deficiency bill. 



San Francisco business men believe that the distance from 
Washington to the Coast is a handicap in receiving commer- 
cial information from the government promptly, and last week 
resolutions of the Chamber of Commerce asking that the branch 
bureau be established were received by the California Con- 
gressmen. Representatives took the matter up with Secretary 
Redfield, and have carried the project to a quick and successful 
conclusion. Redfield said that the bureau ought to be in opera- 
tion not later than next September. A large clerical force will 
be employed under direction of one of the Washington bureau 
chiefs, who will be transferred to San Francisco. At the San 
Francisco bureau all commercial information gathered by the 
government will be available for the city's business men. Co- 
incident with Secretary Redfield's announcement, officials of 
the Chamber of Commerce of the United States said that a 
branch office of that organization probably would be established 
in San Francisco next September. 



Money Prospects. 



Close observers of the trend of 
financial events seem to be of the 
opinion that conditions will be much 
easier from now on, until crop-moving demands begin in the 
fall, at least. Although speculation is quiescent and business 
shows signs of slowing down, these are considered favorable 
because they will decrease the demand for money. 

The expressed willingness of the administration at Washing- 
ton to place the resources of the treasury at the disposal of 
those in need, has created a good impression and a much easier 
feeling in financial circles. 

Although the general feeling is that bankers are not favorable 
to the proposed currency changes, it is thought that the bill 
when it does come before the House for consideration will be 
right in general principle. 



Mexico Shipments 
Decreasing. 



A feature of the monthly export bul- 
letin of the government for April 
is the decline in the California crude 
oil shipments to Mexico, all of 
which go through the Arizona customs district. These ship- 
ments go to Sonora, in the heart of the hostile district, and the 
falling off is attributed to the unsettled conditions of the coun- 
try. The Southern Pacific, which imports most of this oil, has 
its headquarters at Empalme, just outside of Guaymas, where 
the rebels and federals are now fighting. April's shipments this 
year were 21,714 barrels, valued at $34,200, as against 34,414 
barrels, valued at $54,993, last year. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



( Net 
I Tt* 



New York Stock Exchange 

New York Conon Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

Tfce Stock and Bond Exchange, Sin Fraodac* 



Main Office 

MILLS BUILDING 

San Fnocuco, California 



Braicfa Officii 

Loa Angelea San Diego 
Corooado Beach Portland. Ore. 
Seattle. Waab Vancouver. B. C. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Established 1B5S 

SUTRO &, CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Reeard to Any Security 

Will be Furniahed Upon Request 

Membtrt— Th« S«n Fr«ncljco Stock and Bond Exch.nm 




PREFERRED ABOVE 

ALL OTHERS 

by Sarah Bernhardt 

(he 

HEINE "MELODIEPLAYER" 

Heine Piano Co 
87 Stockton St. 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




mmu 



BY BURLEIGH DAVISON. 

Confusion In Traffic Signaling 

Considerable trouble has been caused to motorists and other 
drivers of vehicles by the confusion of street traffic signals used 
by the traffic squad on San Francisco's streets in their work of 
regulating the travel on the principal crossings. A point is 
made by those who claim that the present mode of dual signal- 
ing, i. e., the whistle and the hand signal, that it is impossible 
for the automobilist always to tell what the officer wants when 
he sometimes uses the hand signal, and at other times blows 
his whistle. 

It is said, and with good reason, that if only the whistle 
were used a great deal of annoyance and confusion would be 
avoided. Many times in the blare and din of the street noises, 
the motorist cannot distinguish just what a hand signal may 
mean. Though, on the other hand, he can always tell what one 
or two blasts of the whistle signifies. 

A particular instance of the above confusion of signaling is 
related by a driver who says that he was crossing a busy cor- 
ner when the patrolman gave the signal for the traffic to 
move north and south, though to the driver it looked as if the 
signal was for the travel to move east and west. He tried to 
cross the street at the signal, and was stopped and severely 
called down by the traffic officer. Had the whistle system been 
in use exclusively, this would not have occurred, and much 
embarrassment and ill-feeling been avoided. The Chief of 
Police, by the way, should caution his traffic officers to remem- 
ber that they are dealing with men and women automobilists, 

and not herds of cattle, and govern their language accordingly. 

• * * 

Officious Constable on the Job 

Up Petaluma way there is one of the most important deputy 
sheriffs in the country, according to his own estimation, and if 
the number of automobiles he ' stops for exceeding the four- 
mile per hour speed limit is any criterion. This guardian of 
the lives and property of the citizens of the famous poultry 
center has his favorite stand near a draw-bridge, upon which 
there is a sign warning motor cars not to exceed the speed 
limit of four miles per hour. 

The absurdity of this regulation is best understood when it 
is taken into consideration that an automobile moving at its 
lowest possible speed moves faster than four miles an hour — 
that any machine going or trying to go at this snail's pace 
would nine times out of ten have his motor killed — that a sol- 
dier walking under ordinary conditions makes between three 
and four miles an hour. 

In the second place, the sign warning drivers to go at the 
above crawl is placed upon the bridge instead of one hundred 
feet from it, as it should be, and no automobilist could be ex- 
pected to read the sign and try to cross a dangerous crossing 
at that pace, with the possibility of his engine stalling and 
endangering the lives of the occupants of th3 car. 

A few years ago some eighteen or twenty motorists were ar- 
rested in the vicinity of Petaluma for exceeding the four mile 
per hour ordinance. These cases were thrown out of court, as 
they were too weak to stand. The officious "motor cop" should 
not try to harass every motorist who is touring through this 
beautiful country, or he will divert some very lucrative travel 
from Petaluma. The authorities up there should look a little 

after their representatives on the roads. 

• • • 

New F-I-A-T Landaulets are Beauties 

To reach out for new ideals in the construction of motor cars, 
to combine comfort features with artistic taste, and to present 
to the automobiling public a motor car that expresses the acme 
of the present era of mechanical perfection, has been the task 
i that the Fiat Motor Car Company set itself to do when it built 
the 1914 Landaulet, and produced an automobile that is one of 
the handsomest semi-closed cars on the market to-day. 



Besides being equipped with every standard feature that 
makes for comfort and safety, the new model laudaulets are 
provided with several refinements and exclusive ideas that place 
them above the ordinary run of motor cars. 

In point of interior finish, only the latest high-grade imported 
materials have been used; the woodwork is of black walnut, 
•and adds a richness to the appearance of the cars that stamps 
them as the aristocrats of their class. 

One feature of the new models that has been greatly praised 
by all who have examined them is the adjustable top, which, 
when not in use, lies flat at the same height as the back of the 
seat, allowing an unobstructed view of the surrounding country 
to the occupants of the machine. When up and in place, the 
top presents no unsightly brackets or other devices to mar 
the symmetry of the landaulet's appearance. The top, in ad- 
dition, is water tight, a very desirable feature for touring or town 
driving. 

The appearance of the new model is noticeable; in fact, it 
can hardly be distinguished from any of the smartest limou- 
sines in use: the windows are unusually large, giving the car 
the fine, roomy look of the big touring car, and affording the 
passengers more comfort than in the ordinary type of closed 
machines. 

Besides being one of the easiest riding cars, its motors run 
so smoothly that the car glides along swiftly and silently, add- 
ing greatly to the pleasure of its passengers. The illumination 
of the new landaulets is another up-to-the-minute feature of 
these cars that compels the admiration of all, and in addition 
to the Gray & Davis electric head, side, tail and dash lights, 
the interior of the car is provided with dome lights of rare 
beauty. Upon either opening or closing the doors of the car 
the steps are lighted automatically by small electric lamps. 

The Fiat Landaulets are built in three different power ratings, 
filling wants according to the inclinations of several types of 
use. The thirty-five horsepower, four-cylinder car, with a 
wheel base of 123 inches, equipped with both the electric light- 
ing systems, and the electric self-starter, is listed at $5,250, 
and is in every sense a car that fulfills every need of the man 
who wants something elegant, reasonably powerful and com- 
fortable. 

The forty-five horsepower four-cylinder model has a wheel 
base of 128 inches, and like thfc "thirty-five" model it is provided 
with all the refinements of the most modern cars, including the 
electric illuminating systems and the electric self-starters. This 
modei sells for $5,750, and is one of the handsomest semi- 
closed cars on the market. 

The F-i-a-t "Six" is a fifty horsepower model, with a wheel 
base of 135 inches, making it one of those long, graceful cars, 
full of power and speed, easy riding and silent running, and 
in every way the car de luxe for either town touring or cross- 
country driving. This type of car sells for $6,250, and is like 
the other Fiat landaulet models, equipped with electric lights 
and electric self-starter. 

The Fiat Motor Sales Company, who are agents for these 
cars here, have their salesrooms and service station at 1914 
Van Ness avenue, where the new model will be on display. 

The Fiat, in addition to being one of the most powerful, is 
one of the safest and most comtortable cars on the market to- 
day, and has established an enviable record the world over. 



Make the Bay Cities Roads Better Known 

The work being done by the San Francisco Bay and River 
Counties Touring Association in trving to get travelers and tour- 
ists to stay over in this city and the bay sections for at least 
ten days to visit the numerous places of interest, is one that 
should receive the support of every motor car owner in this 
section. In fact, it would be a step in the right direction if the 
automobile men of the bay cities would get together and try 
and arrange so that tourists could take side trips over some of 
our fine country roads in machines. 

Nothing will advertise the State as well as these trips taken 
by people who travel all over the world, and >vhen you consider 
;mber of tourists who could be induced to stay here and 
ride out to our show places, it will be found to be one of the 
biggest factors in the way of favorable publicity that the bay 
c ities can have. 

The steamship travel to San Francisco alone is something 
over twenty-three thousand each month. It is worth while to 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



go after these people and try and educate them to the fact that 
we have some of the most beautiful scenic tours around the bay 
that any land in the world possesses. 

An automobiling tour bureau, established to furnish informa- 
tion pertaining to the various places, the best roads to drive 
over, the distances, accommodations en route, cost of trips, etc., 
would be the means of building up a fine automobile touring 
business for the garages and motor car owners of the city, and 
incidentally make this section the Mecca of touring automo- 
bilists. 

* * * 

Big Road Race to End In Sacramento 

The action of the supervisors of Alameda, Santa Clara and 
San Mateo Counties in refusing the entrants of the _ Panama- 
Pacific Los Angeles-San Francisco road race the privilege of 
riding over certain prescribed roads in their lespective sections 
at more than thirty miles per hour has resulted in the race end- 
ing in Sacramento. The authorities in the Capital City 
offered substantial prizes to the winners of the race, and agreed 
to effectually patrol the road from Stockton to their city, so 
the managers of the race decided in favor of Sacramento at a 
meeting the first of the week. With a clear course from Los 
Angeles to Sacramento, it is expected that new world's records 
will be made for speed and endurance tests. 

The plea that life and limb of those who ordinarily use the 
roads is endangered by allowing the racers to speed over the 
county at a racing rate, as in the case of this race, does not 
hold good, for in addition to the elaborate and efficient system 
of patrols that will be established, the mere fact that so much 
publicity has been given the route will familiarize everybody 
with the course, and they will be on the lookout for the racers. 

If big races in the East, like the Vanderbilt Cup race, can 
be run over roads in a much more densely populated country 
with safety, it seems absurd that the forthcoming contest can- 
not be held under equally satisfactory conditions. 

The management of the race, we are glad to note, have seen 
that every precaution was observed so that no accident would 
happen. They and the great automobiling public are vitally 
interested in seeing that the racing sport be kept free from 
anything that would bring discredit upon the game, and it seems 
very niggardly, to say the least, that the present course is be- 
ing followed by the authorities in dealing with the Panama- 
Pacific race. 

There is just as much danger to the traveler over the road in 
the southern part of the State as there is up here, yet the racers 
are not being hampered there by petty rules and regulations by 
the authorities of the different counties through which the route 
lies. In fact, they are meeting with every possible encourage- 
ment. From a monetary standpoint, the action of the super- 
visors is deplorable, and it is one that will reflect adversely 
upon the counties where this action has been taken. The ad- 
vertising that these counties through which vhe race course lies 
will lose, will be tremendous ; the money that the various teams 
would spend, and the trade that the immense number of pri- 
vate cars, brought to these places by the desire to witness the 
race, will amount to many thousands of dollars, which will be 
lost on account of this short-sighted policy. 

* * • 

A Change In the Management of the Lozier Branch 

The Lozier Motor Company, through their Pacific Coast man- 
ager, L. H. Rose, announce the sale this week of their San 
Francisco branch to Bekins-Speers Motor Company of Los 
Angeles. 

"Since the advent of the new administration under the man- 
agement of Joseph M. Gilbert, things have moved so rapidly 
with this company in assuming a policy of progressiveness and 
expansion that they have attracted the attention of the entire 
automobile world," says Pacific Coast Manager L. H. Rose, of 
the Lozier Company. 

"This latest move, following closely on the heels of the an- 
nouncement recently made of the sale of the New York branch 
to Harry Houpt, one of the best known men in the automobile 
business in the East, is evidence of a well defined sales policy 
laid out under the direction of Sales Manager Paul Smith. 

"This policy has been carried out in a characteristic manner, 
which will plainly justify the interest manifested by the public 
in the rapid development of this already well-known company. 

"With a product of the character and reputation of the Lozier, 




J. N. Burge Milo W. Bekins L. H. Rose 

Sales Manager. Vice-President. Coast Manager. 

Frohman Speers, President 
Bekins-Speers Motor Co., Lozier Distributors for Cali- 
fornia, Nevada and Arizona. Photos by Arthur Spaulding Co. 

and a policy founded on a sound business basis, and of a nature 
such as our new administration is putting into effect, the most 
essential feature, in fact, the very foundation of it is to have 
local representation of a high standing. 

"This is necessary in this day and age of the automobile 
business, not only from the standpoint of the owners, but of the 
manufacturer as well. The greatest success in the marketing of 
automobiles to-day can only be attained through the closest co- 
operation between the factory, its local representatives and the 
owners. 

"This is especially essential under our methods where we 
maintain a complete factory organization of both salesmen and 
practical service men at our own expense, and work hand in 
hand with our local representatives. 

"Under this method, it is only natural, therefore, in arrang- 
ing our San Francisco connection that we should turn to the 
Bekins-Speers Motor Company, who are one of the best known 
and most successful firms in the West, and whose record in the 
sale of Lozier cars in Southern California has been second only 
to New York City for the past three years. 

"Starting in a very* modest manner, three years ago, Milo 
Bekins and Frohman Speers, whose names appear in the firm 
title, have advanced themselves and the Lozier line in Southern 
California until to-day they are just completing and will shortly 
move into one of the finest, if not the finest, building on auto- 
mobile row in Los Angeles. Their entire efforts and success 
have been with the Lozier car; and, in taking over the San 
Francisco branch, which includes Northern California, Arizona 
and Nevada territory, they assume a position in the front ranks 
of Western motor car dealers to which their record entitles 
them. 

"Bekins and Speers are the type of men who have made good 
in the automobile business, and have been prominent in intro- 
ducing methods and policies which have placed the selling of 
automobiles on a sound business basis, so different to the early 
methods employed when the automobile business was known 
more commonly, and considered as a game. 

"In speaking of their latest step, and particularly their plans 
for the future, both Bekins and Speers feel that the possibili- 
ties in the San Francisco territory are even larger than the 
Los Angeles; and, with this in view, they have already opened 
negotiations for a new building, and contracts will, no doubt, 
be closed within the next week or ten days for a building to 
be erected immediately. 

"It is their idea to duplicate very closely their new building 
in Los Angeles. 'Speers and myself intend to give our per- 
sonal attention to our San Francisco branch,' says Bekins, 'al- 
though it is our idea to continue the members of the present 
organization here, with possibly some few changes as to their 
positions. We had no hesitancy in appointing J. N. Burge, with 



July S, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



whom we have been acquainted for some years, as retail sales 
manager; and Burge has already assumed his duties as such. 

"A. R. Dawson will continue in his present position, and 
with Burge in charge of the retail sales, will be able to give 
more of his time to the agents throughout the State, and direct 
his personal efforts to the wholesale end of the business. 

"We have found in our experience that the day for selling 
automobiles from catalogues and pictures has long since passed, 
and that to render the best of service to the buyer it is essential 
that every convenience be afforded him, and, for this reason, 
we are especially anxious to get into a new building which will 
afford us ample floor space for exhibition purposes. 

"We have already placed orders with the factory for a com- 
plete line of cars for exhibition as well as delivery. It is our 
intention to show on our floors all the models and especially 
to feature the limousine, coupe and other models of inside drive 
cars which are fast becoming so popular with the buying public. 

"We believe that the San Francisco buyers will appreciate an 
opportunity to see the finished product in making their selec- 
tions." 

Ocean-to-Ocean Highway Plans 

According to the final plans of the Lincoln Highway Asso- 
ciation, the ocean-to-ocean highway plans call for a concrete 
road to be built whenever practicable; this will mean that fully 
2,000 miles of permanent improvements will be made. 

The Lincoln Highway Association proposes to act with local 
communities, whenever it is possible, and thus to reach the 
maximum of efficiency without confusion or doubling of work. 
A number of the States through which the highway will run 
have taken steps to construct roads from east to west to con- 
nect with the ocean-to-ocean highway, which will form part of 
that great project. 

* * * 

Alco Truck Dumps Load In Half-minute 

A new body operated by power and built on an entirely new 
principle, has been turned out by the Alco Company. C. A. 
Benjamin, general sales manager of that company, has an- 
nounced the sale of two of these models for road work in 
Georgia. The new device enables the operator of the truck to 
raise the body to an angle of 65 degrees in less than 15 sec- 
onds, thereby saving time and trouble in this important part of 
motor truck work. 

From Wilds of Central Oregon 

Fred Renstrom, who is on the road for his brother, Frank 
Renstrom, the Regal Underslung distributor, brings an inter- 
esting story from his last trip into the wilds of Central Oregon. 
It concerns a Regal roadster that a traveling peddler has been 
using for four years, during which it has covered every part 
of the interior of Oregon. 

"I saw this car at Lost Valley, in Wheeler County, Oregon," 
said Renstrom. "Lost Valley is a very small place, with not 
over forty inhabitants. It is miles away from a railroad, and 
has not even a post office. There is a log cabin called a hotel, 
where I got a room for the night at a cost of three dollars. It 
was either that or sleep in the open, and I couldn't see it that 
way. The morning after I reached Lost Valley, where I was 
looking up a missing car, a Regal roadster, with a big box back 
of the seat, rolled up to the 'hotel.' The driver was the owner, 
and had come from Prineville, in the central part of the State, 
over roads that a burro would hesitate to travel. His tires were 
cut into shreds, and I don't understand how he held them to- 
gether. He carried four extra casings, besides his camping 
outfit and his peddler's goods. He told me he had been trav- 
eling the worst roads of Oregon, both summer and winter, for 
four years, and had never met with an accident to his car that 
he could not himself repair while on the road. That's some 
record, isn't it?" 



their work is conceded to be the best that an up-to-date plant, 
h class mechanics and the very best of materials can 
produce. 



Lozler Negotiates Steep Hills 

It is instructive to compare the demonstration of motor cars 
of to-day and some seven years ago. In the early stages of the 
automobile industry, a demonstrator would take a running start 
at a hill, and when the top was reached, exclaim with joy: 
"Did you see her make it? No hill too steep for this car." 

The marked contrast of to-day is most striking. A prospec- 
tive buyer does not wish to know how fast a car can go up a 
hill, but how safely and slowly. 

A beautiful demonstration of this power was recently given 
by A. R. Dawson, manager of the San Francisco branch of 
the Lozier Motor Company. A light "six" Lozier was taken 
up Devisadero street from Vallejo to Pacific Avenue. These 
two blocks are about as steep as can be found in San Francisco. 
They are covered with grass and cobbles, making it hard to 
get traction. Starting from a standing start, the Lozier went 
up at five miles an hour. The speed was increased to ten, and 
then allowed to go back to three, and then again increased to 
ten. It was a beautiful demonstration of the flexibility of the 
motor. Not being satisfied with this splendid demonstration, 
Dawson took the Light Six Lozier back down Jackson Street 
and from a standing start at Gough went up the hill and 
crossed Washington at 15 miles an hour. This block of 
Gough Street is practically one of the steepest in San Francisco 
and it is a question if it is ever used by the horse drawn or 
motor vehicle." 



Mitchell Makes 161,796 Mile Record 

The work done by a 1909 seven-passenger Model "L" Mit- 
chell in mountain stage work in Montana has caused much com- 
ment among automobile owners there. H. T. Calhoun, of 
Calhoun & Adams' "Big Stone Barn," writes that his car has 
run over 161,796 miles up to date, according to the speedometer, 
most of the time carrying an overload and through the moun- 
tainous country of Montana. Standing up under this work 
since 1909 shows the kind of staying qualities the Mitchell 
possesses. Representatives of the Mitchell-Lewis Motor Co. 
have other record runs that confirm the above. One is of a 
Model "K" 1909 car, that has made its 90,000 miles, and like 
the Model "L" is good for several years more work. 

* * * 

Sequoia Park to be Opened to Autolsts 

Captain McCaskey, acting superintendent of the Sequoia 
National Park, announced on Tuesday last the receipt of a wire 
from Washington, notifying him that the park would be opened 
to automobiles this summer, as recommended last year by 
Acting Superintendent Walter Fry of Three Rivers. This will 
open the Giant Forest to automobile tourists. Regulations for 
the use of the park by autoists are on the way from Washington 

by mail. 

• • • 

Auto Used for Window Show 

One of the handsomest enameled Marion model 37-A chassis 
which was used as an exhibit at the New York Show, was re- 
cently displayed in conjunction with a piano exhibit by an en- 
terprising Indianapolis music house during the week of the 
speedway races. The black and white enameled Marion chassis 
was placed in the show window; upon the rear of the machine 
a piano was installed bearing numerous signs telling in motor 
car parlance the advantages of the instrument. The scenic 
decorations in the window, and the combined machines attracted 
large crowds at all hours while the display lasted. 



Removal of an Old-Established Firm. 

Larkins & Co., carriage and automobile body builders, have 
issued cards announcing their removal from their old factory 
at 276 Guerrero street to 1610-14 Van Ness avenue, between 
California and Sacramento streets. Larkins & Co. are an old- 
established firm in San Francisco, having been doing business 
for the past forty years. Their reputation is of the best, and 



Rambler Company Delivers Trucks 

The local branch of the Thomas B. Jeffery Company has re- 
ceived two carloads of Rambler 1 • g ton trucks during the past 
week, which they at once delivered to waiting customers. Ac- 
cording to A. J. Kleimeyer, manager of the local branch, they 
are expecting the arrival of four carloads of one-ton trucks soon 
which will be placed in San Francisco and vicinity. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



Regal Adopts Uniform Sales Policy 

The used car problem in the motor car industry is one that 
has been, and still is, a very vexing trade condition. Dealers 
who take the stand that they will not accept a used car as part 
payment on a new one often lose sales by this course. On the 
other hand, the dealer who does trading, and nearly all of them 
are now forced to, to meet competition, has to dispose of his 
used cars before he can make a profit on his sales. 

"We intend to meet the situation squarely," said Frank O. 
Renstrom, local Regal and Kline-Kar distributer, "and we will 
handle old cars by the same selling system that we sell our other 
machines. Each end of the business is separate. Each de- 
partment has its separate manager and sales force, and each is 
conducted for the ultimate betterment of our customers." 



Rambler New Building to Serve Public 

Modern ideas in serving the public and care for the comfort 
of the visitors to their plant, were the key notes that the manu- 
facturers of the Cross Country cars observed when they put 
up their new office structure at Kenosha, Wisconsin. Ten 



thousand square feet of floor space has been added to the Jef- 
fery plant, with the completion of this building, of which 
forty-five hundred will be used for the reception of dealers 
and their customers. The new structure was opened on the 
first of June. 

Constructed of vitrified brick, with every facility for the 
rapid and efficient handling of business, the addition to the 
Rambler plant, besides providing for the comfort of its visi- 
tors and patrons, will accommodate the executive offices, the 
sales and advertising departments, the service and accounting 
departments, and also will provide large show rooms for the 

Cross Country cars. 

» • • 

Goodyear Reduces Motorcycle Tire Prices 

The Goodyear Tire Company of Akron, Ohio, has announced 
a ten per cent reduction on motorcycle tires. In explaining the 
cut, S. A. Falor, manager of the motorcycle department of the 
Goodyear Company, said that it was owing to the fact that the 
price of crude rubber was lower, and that the increased de- 
mand for motorcycle tires enabled them to make the tires 
cheaper. 



K 
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We Beg to Announce 
The Beau Brummel of Motordom 

The 1914 Kissel 40" 



($1850 F. O. B. Factory) 



A Luxurious, Ultra-Aristocratic 
Conveyance Whose Perfectness in 
Design, Construction, Finish and 
Equipment Distinguishes It as a 
Positive Triumph in Motor Craft. 

ON DISPLAY AT OUR SALESROOMS 

Pacific Kissel Kar Branch 



(Successors to Standard Motor Car Co.) 



GOLDEN GATE AND VAN NESS AVENUES 
San Francisco 



12TH AND MADISON STREETS 
Oakland 



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July 5, 1913. 



and Californ Advertiser 



27 



Weslcott Motor Cars Gain Favor 

"Way back in the heart of Hoosierdom, a famous automobile 
manufacturing center, the Westcott Motor Car Company is 
building a motor car which is attracting a great deal of atten- 
tion on the Pacific Coast," says Harvy Goodwin, of the Dillon- 
Goodwin Company, agents tor the Westcott car. "Nearly fifty 
years ago the Westcott Carriage Company was organized in 
Richmond, Indiana. At that time high standards were set. Each 
year the same high standards have been maintained, and a con- 
sistent effort made to. elevate them. From a small beginning 
the company grew, became prosperous and widely known as 
manufacturers of high-class vehicles. On this foundation has 
been built the organization of the Westcott Motor Car Com- 
pany. All experience gained in years of manufacturing is now 

transmitted to the purchaser of the Westcott automobile." 

* * * 

Latham Back from Los Angeles 

Bert Latham, head of the Simplex-Mercer Company of San 
Francisco, has just returned from Los Angeles. The motive of 
the trip was to secure more cars for the San Francisco branch. 
Among the cars secured is a new 1914 Simplex of 38 h. p., 
which will arrive in this city soon and be delivered to a pur- 
chaser. "Los Angeles is race mad," says Latham. "Race cars 
swarm the streets like noisy bees, and the roar of the exhausts 
sounds like a battlefield of rapid-fire guns. Los Angeles is too 
hot, and after a stay there of forty-eight hours I was mighty 

glad to get back to San Francisco." 

• * * 

Testa New Device on Paige-Detroit 

The new fuel control device, which has been invented by 
John A. Doxey, and which he has named the Doxameter, was 
recently given a severe test on the streets of Indianapolis on the 
Paige-Detroit car of Dr. Nusbaum. The doctor had never be- 
fore seen the device. Under many varying tests the new inven- 
tion measured fully up to the claims made by its makers, and it 
showed that as a fuel saver it is a wonderful little machine. 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 1865 

Announces the removal of their Offices and Factory to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sts. 
Phone Prospect 30 

where their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery of 
the best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



Suggests Way to Manage Race Cars 

Many lessons are learned as each succeeding 50O mile race 
goes into history, and now in the aftermath of the big Indian- 
apolis affair an idea has come to George M. Dickson, general 
manager of the National Company, for keeping the different 
racers on the speedway informed of their actual time and rela- 
tive positions on the track. Dickson believes that some sort 
of telegraph system could be devised which would inform the 
men in the pits as to the exact position and time of the racers, 
and they in their turn could thus post their drivers much more 
advantageously than by the present system of depending wholly 

upon the posted notices at the judges' stands. 

* * * 

New Assistant Sales Manager for Olds 

The Olds Motor Works of Lansing, Mich., has appointed a 
new assistant sales manager to handle its output in the person 
of N. W. Barton, who for years was connected with the New 
York Edison Company and the General Electric Company. 
Mr. Barton has ample experience in the automobile world, and 
was, just previous to his recent appointment, with the technical 
department of the Olds Company, and is, consequently, con- 
versant with the Olds factory methods and their product. 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
a /[ rr\ y-~v y If you want to reduce your oil 

MoloRoL ~ 

Use MoToRoL 
'"It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich SSL Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-847 Market Street San Francisco 

Loa Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coast Agrots 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 
CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING <**• m.™ M w 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Full factory equipment on all Pack- 

"unnt/cD'i arda. Oldseaoblles, Coles. Ttiooai «nj 

HUUVcK Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four — $14 to SiS. I'nJtr 

At IV II IARY SPRINCi Sr compression by heavy loads. rough 

AUAILIAIM SrKIWU OT. ro . d s or bumps. Under all conditions 

rides as easy as on asphalt. Itnpos- 
SHOCK ABSORBER slble to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
61- Turk St.. San Francisco 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PAN HARD L. H. 4 B. I. BILL. 
f~ N T T 543 Oolden Gate Ave. 
^-^ ■*■ ■*— ■ ' San Francisco. Cal. 


Machinists and Engineers 
!/" C C M A M DD/"iC Automobile Repairing a Specialty 
IxbblNAIN BKUb. „. c,,d.n Gate Avenue, bet Hyde 

and Lutein Strut! 
Phon.11 Franklin Wat H»bi J mi 


AMERICAN THERMOS BOTTLE 

THERMOS company 

Thermos Building. New York City 
BOTTLES, CARAFES , " d 

MOGENSON WELLS CO. 

And LUNCH KITS Phelan Bldr . San Fraaciice 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



DeVaux Returns from the East 

"California for some time has led other States in the sale of 
Reo cars, and from all appearances, will continue to lead for 
some time," says Norman DeVaux, head of the Reo-Pacific 
Company of San Francisco. DeVaux just arrived in San Fran- 
cisco on Tuesday morning, after a trip East to the Reo-Pacific 
factory at Lansing, Michigan. Says DeVaux : 

"The factory is working full shift, and the demand for cars 
has not slackened since the season began, although the rush that 
always attends the first of the season has disappeared, and the 
work settled down to steady, consistent effort. Cars are being 
produced at an amazing rate. Freight cars roll up to the ship- 
ping sheds behind switch engines, are loaded, and roll away 
again. This goes on all day and every day. 

"A meeting of distributors was held at the factory office 
which lasted several days. The factory product was discussed, 
as was also the business situation. Every one of the men there 
was optimistic and showed good cause to the last man of them. 
As there were men present from all parts of the United States, 
the fact that they were universally agreed on the favorable mar- 
ket conditions which exist in the respective territory of each, it 
is safe to conclude that throughout the country the automobile 
business is good, and that worthy cars are finding a ready 

market." 

* * * 

" Skid," a Motor Car Expression 

"Skidding in the general American acceptance and applica- 
tion of the term means sideslip, and not slipping in the line of 
movement forward or backward," says H. B. Pratt, Pacific 
Coast manager of the Fisk Rubber Company. "In lumbering 
the term means just that — to 'skid' a log sidewise. In automo- 
bile parlance the term is applied loosely, and that brings a 
contemporary up to ask 'Why automobiles have adopted the 
slang word skidding for (in place of) to slide?' Skid is not 
slang. It is a mighty good, old-style, dignified word admitted 
into good society in the dictionary, as well as where automobiles 
congregate. Skid is a noun, tracing its pedigree further back 
than automobiles. It is also a verb : it is spelled skid, skeed, 
skio and ski. It is an expressive word of the greatest value, 
and among other debts we owe it is that it is the root of that 
quintessence of highly concentrated invitation to depart, 
'skiddoo.' " 



injsigrejBrarijaremararararaiznizizraizraiztaraiaiaziaiaiaraiaizrareiziziziziziBizn^ 





It Made The Automobile Safe. Do 
not accept substitutes. "Raybestos" 
is the standard brake lining of the 
industry. The name is stamped on 
every foot for your protection. 



Th 



Royal Equipment Company 
BridReport. Conn. 
CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

Pacific C03M Distributers 



tknU&cJttSHlRRSMiPfiWZEVmSZS^'-* ■■•LnRTU?IU2nftJ2SVZIiJ3S21i!fZIVVZJZlU2nS2J2 




Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearings with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All size* carried in stock 




Pacific Coast Distributors 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 



San Francisco 



Los Angelas 



Seattle Spokan 



BETTER 
OILS 



MEAN 



BETTER 
RUNNING 

HARRIS 

TRADE MARK REGISTERED 

OILS 

ARE BETTER OILS 



Good cylinder oil is absolutely essen- 
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HARRIS OILS are distinctly better 
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engine— more power, more speed, at 
less cost for lubrication. Ask your 
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A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 

326 S. Water St.. Providence. R. I. 143 No. Wabash Ave.. Chicaio. III. 

PACIFIC C0A8T AGENT*, 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE FRESNO PORTLAND SPOKANE 



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ASK US OR ANY LEE DEALER 

Pacific Coast Distributor! 

Chanslor ^ Lyon Company 



Los Angeles 

Spokane 



Portland 

San Francisco 



Seattle 
Fresno 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Phono Sutter 300 Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 

FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 
A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living in San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 
THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 




•STORE YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

Convenient to All Downtown 

HOTELS - CLUBS - THEATRES 






COLUMBIA GARAGE 






655 GEARY ST., near Jones. Phone Franklin 544 

Day and Night Washing and Storage— Supplies— Tires 
Machine Shop— Vulcanizing— Electrics 





BETTS 

CRESCENT GRADE 

AUTOMOBILE SPRINGS 

Guaranteed against break 
age or settling for 
on* year 



Phone 
Kearny 2472 




Manufactured by 

BETTS SPRING CO. 

888-890 Folsom St. 



Sin Frincisce, Cil. 



Copyright 1912 Betts Spring Co. 



Fireproof garage and 
machine shop fully 



FOR SALE! etiuipped . Morework 

than can be taken care of. Large list of satisfied cus- 
tomers. A fine paying proposition. Elegantly located 
near San Francisco. Must sell. 



Box 100, News Letter 



21 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St.. San Francisco, Cat. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



>ONA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 

PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street, 



San Francisco 



Tips to Automobi lists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

CYPRESS LODGE, BELMONT.— Phone Belmont 111. Touring Informa- 
tion. Meals at all hours. Our specialty, steaks and broils; cold lunches. 
Private dining rooms. Thoroughly equipped bar. 

NELSON & JOHNSON, Propr. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for flrst-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of first and St. James Sts. 

LOS GATOS. — Autos for hire. Repairing, storage and supplies at LOS 
GATOS GARAGE, Santa Cruz Ave. Tel. 33. W. D. Poole, Prop. Every- 
thing new and fireproof. 

— SArTjOSE^Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North *irst street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

'' PALO ALTO^— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



PALO ALTO LARKIN'S CAFE— Just opened. The only strictly flrst- 
class cafe on the "Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 
MONTEREY COUNTY. 
SOLEDAD.— JOHNSON'S GARAGE. Gas, oils, machine shop, repairing, 
storage. Telephone Main 171. Autos for hire day or night. Agency 

Ove rland and Kissel cars. 

— MONTEREY.— SELBY BROS. GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Agents 
for Stutz and Oakland cars. Autos for hire. Oil, gasoline and sundries. 

First-class repair work and service. Phone Montere y 33. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
SANTA CRUZ. — Stop at JENSEN BROS. AUTO CO.. the newest and 
finest equipped garage and machine shop. One-half block from St. George 
Hotel. One block to right after crossing ^overedbridge. Ph one 697. 
SANTA CRUZ. — When in Santa Cruz stop with the BEACH GARAGE, 
' the Casa Del Rey Hotel. Noted for its high-class service. Corn- 
pair shop, open day and night. Full line of accessories and 

, 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa. "You Auto" stop here, 
rved. 



A menu of limited 



SANTA ROSA.— GRAND GARAGE. Third and Main Sts.. opp. Court- 
house. First-class repair work. Electric starting system and batteries re- 
charged. Phone 106. Cadillac cars. 

GEYSERVILLE.— PIONEER GARAGE. A. Lampson & Sons. Props. 
Fully equipped blacksmith and machine shop. Studebaker headquarters. 
Urea in slock; supplies and repairs. Tel. Main 251. Main St., GeyservihV 

PETALUMA.— PETALTJMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 

& Murphy Props. Cor. Third and C Sts; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 

midline work and gear cutting; supplies, repairing, auto livery; 

lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries. 

CLOVERDALE.— WARRENS GARAGE. Geo. F. Warren. Prop Fully 
equipped blacksmith and machine shop; Studebaker headquarters; tires In 
,',DDlies and repairs. Upper West St.. Cloverdale. Phone Main 221. 
LAKE COUNTY. 

i AKEPORT— WALTERS & FRASER Garage and Machine Shop. Fifth 
and Main Sts. ' Vulcanizing, gasoline and lubricants General machine and 
,1 work. W. Walters. Y. E. Frnzer. Phone Main 84. 

I AKEPORT — LAKEVIEW HOTEL (under new management), on Clear 
lake Every convenience lor automoblllsts. Garages near by. Rates 
reasonable. F. E. Carpenter. Proprietor. 



San Francisco 



"Pillsbury's Pictures" 



of California's Scenic Beauty Spots. When you return 
from your auto trip have your films finished by experts 
and see the largest collection of Western views at 
219 POWELL STREET 



A FEW BARGAINS 

BAKER ELECTRIC 

FLANDERS ELECTRIC • 

WOODS ELECTRIC 

OVERLAND ROADSTER . 
7 PASSENGER KNOX 

BOX 101, NEWS LETTER 

21 SUTTER STREET, 



NEW 
NEW 
NEW 
$ 500 
3.500 



S. F. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



leading j\merican (3rs 




HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 
San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Models Pric« 

24 Eunabout fSjO 

25 Touring Car J°»" 

30 Roadster JJ|» 

31 Touring Car J;»» 

■40 Touring Car lfa;jU 




J. I. CASE T. M. CO., INC. 
San Francisco. 
Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 
Model H. P. Price 

2-Pass. Roadster 30 $lo00 

5-Pass. Touring 30 1500 

5-Fass. Touring 40 ^200 

7-Pass. Touring 40 2400 



Qhalmers 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1913 Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model "6," Thirty-six. 

Touring Car, 5-pass $2400 51950 

Touring Car, 7-Pass 2600 2150 

Torpedo, 4-Pass 2400 1950 

Roadster. 2-Pass 2400 1950 

All prices include full equipment and are f. o. b. 
Detroit. 




PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 
Golden Gate Avenue and Polk St., San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. San Francisco. 
Models — 

40 — 4-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster $1800 

40 — i-eyl. 5 Pass. Touring 1800 

60— 6-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster 2600 

60— 6-cyl. 4 Pass. Demi-Tonneau 2600 

60 — 6-cyl. 5 Pass. Touring 2600 

60— 6-cyl. 7 Pass. Touring 2650 




OSEN-McFARLAND AUTO CO. 
San Francisco and San Jose 

Model— Price 

Empire 31 $1050 

5-Passenger touring car, completely equipped. 



K^-S 




Zr&rxl 



PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model — Price 

Model "T" Touring Car $600 

Model "T" Runabout 525 

Model "T" Town Car 800 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 
301 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Standard Models 

Model H. P. Price 

Touring Car 60 $2900 

Roadster 60 2900 

Town Car 60 3900 




HAYNES AUTO SALES CO. 

Turk at Polk St. 
Prices F. O. B. Pacific Coast. 

Model 24— 2, 4 and 5 Pass. (4-cyl.) $1,950 

Model 24— Coupe (4-cyl.) 2,400 

Model 23— 2, 4 and 5 Pass. (6-cyl.) 1,701 

Model 23— 6 Pass. (6-cyl.) 

Model 23— Coupe (6-cyl.) 3.200 

Model 23— Limousine (6-cyl.) 3.850 




S. G. CHAPMAN 



1036 Van Ness Avenue 



San Francisco 



Standard Models 



Prices F. O. 
Model "37 37 h. p. 

Touring Car $1875 

Phaeton 1876 

Roadster 1875 

Limousine 3250 

Coupe 2350 



B. Factory. 
Model "54" 64 h. p. 

Touring Car $2450 

Phaeton 2450 

Roadster 2450 

Limousine 3750 

Coupe 2950 




LOZ1ER MOTOR COMPANY BRANCH 


Van Ness Avenue 


San Francisco 


Type 72 Prices F. 


O. B. Factory Type 77 


Model — Price 
7-Pass. Touring $5000 
5-Pass. Touring 6000 
4-Pass. Touring 5000 
4-Pass. Toy Ton. 5000 
2-Pass. Runab't 5000 
7-Pass. Limous'n 6500 


Model — Price 
5-Pass. Touring $3250 
2-Pass. Runab't 3250 
6-Pass. Limous'n 4450 
5-Pasa Limous'n 4450 
3-Pass. Coupe 3850 




MARION MOTOR CAR CO. 

•~>55 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

37-A Touring 40 $1475 

48-A Touring 48 1850 

36-A Roadster 40 1425 

38-A Roadster 40 1476 

All Cars Completely Equipped. 




MORRIS KENNEDY CO., INC., 

345 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

New Series Marmon "Thirty-Two" 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Mod. Thirty-Two 

Chassis $2500 

Five-Pass. Tour- 
ing Car 3000 

Four-Pass. Sub- 
urban 3000 

Roadster 2900 

Speedster 2850 

Limousine 4000 



Landaulet $4100 

Marmon "Six" 
2, 4, 6 and 7-pas- 

senger $5000 

Limousine 6280 

Landaulet 6350 

Berllne Limousine 

6460 



Goodyear Truck. Tires In Victory 

After a severe test, which took the trucks over some of the 
hardest roads between Washington, D. C, and Hagerstown, 
Md., and which took four days to run, an examination of the 
tires of the trucks used was made by government officials, and 
according to information received by F. N. Carroll, manager 
of the local Goodyear Tire Company, the Goodyear tires won a 
decided victory over other makes in the contest. The fact that 
the Goodyear factory has specialized on six different types of 
truck tires is ascribed as one of the reasons for their success in 
the recent tests. 

"No one type of tire can meet every condition," says Mr. 
Carroll. The weight and speed of different trucks, the dif- 
ferent road conditions demand specific treatment. The fact 
that the eight classes of trucks in the recent run were equipped 



with tires to meet the special conditions that truck had to un- 
dergo, helped to determine the success of the run." 

• • * 

Haynes 1914 "Six" Favorably Received 

The much-heralded Haynes 1914 "Six," which has been 
anxiously awaited here by the automobile fraternity, arrived in 
San Francisco last week and is now on display at the local 
Haynes branch salesrooms. The new model is distinctively a 
Haynes production in every respect, having the comfortable, 
roomy and substantial qualities of preceding models of this 
car. The 1914 six-cylinder car has the tendency to accentuate 
the Haynes earmarks: the wheel base of the new model meas- 
ures 130 inches, and the hood is much longer than on pre- 
vious cars. The Haynes 1914 "Six," like the four-cylinder car, 
is both electrically lighted and started, has th.; popular left-hand 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



31 





MICHIGAN MOTOR CAR CO. 

California Branch 

283-291 Golden Gate Ave San Francisco 

Imperial Garage — Oakland 

Standard Models 

Model— Price 

"L" and "O" 33 h. p $1690 

"R" and "S" 40 h. p. 1876 




UNITED MOTORS S. F. COMPANY. 

Polk St., near McAllister San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model 26. 6-Pass. Touring Car 

Model 36, 6-Pass. Touring Car $1086 

Model 40, 6-Pass. Touring Car 1660 

Model 60, 7-Pass. Touring Car 2360 




SIMPLEX-MERCER PAC. COAST AGENCY 

1319 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. 

Type 35, Series G, 4-Pass 32.4 h. 

Type 36. Series H. 6-Pass 32.4 h. 

Type 35, Series .1, Race'b't 30.6 h 

Type 35.. Series K. Runabout ..30.6 h. 





Price 


p. 


$3100 


p. 


3100 


p 


2860 


p. 


2860 



METZ 



LOUIS J. BORIE, 

Central and Northern Distributor, 
1255 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Delivered In San Francisco. 

Price 

MeU "22&," fully equipped, 22 h. p J67B 

Metz Soeclal, 22% h. p 496 




HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 

523 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Five Models, Improved Series V. 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Semi-Racing Roadster $2750 

Speedway Roadster 3150 

Toy Tonneau 3300 

Five-Passenger Touring Car 3300 

Seven-Passenger Touring Car 3400 

Also Limousines, Sedans and Coupes. 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 



301 Go 


den Gate Ave. 




San Francisco 




Standard 


Models. 




Model 
69- T 
69-P 
69-R 
69-C 


H. P. Price ■ 

30 h. p. $1100 
30 h. p. 1125 
30 h. p. 1100 
30 h. p. 1660 


Model 
71-T 
71-F 
71-R 


H. P. Price 
46 h. p. $1625 
45 h. p. 1626 
45 h. p. 1625 






PATHFINDER MOTOR CAR CO. 

Geary and Polk Sts. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Five-Pass, touring car. 40 horsepower $2185 

Four- Pass, phaeton. 40 horsepower 2185 

Two -Pass. Roadster. 40 horsepower 2160 

Three-Pass, coach, 40 horsepower 2500 

Two-Pmpp, cruiser, 40 horsepower 2000 

Delivery wagon, 40 horsepower 2000 



w 



iercey/rrow 



PIERCE-AR 
Geary and Polk Sts. 



kLES CO. 

San Francisco 



Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Model 


H. P 






Price 


38-C 


38 h. p. 


r.-i in 


Touring 


$4300 


48-B 


48 h. p 


7-Pass. 


Touring 


6000 


66 -A 


66 h. p. 




Touring 


6000 




FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

F. O. B. San Francisco. 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Model "T" TJnderslung Touring Car $1125 

Model *'N" Underslung Roadster 1075 

Model "H" Underslung Touring Car 1526' 

Regal Underslung Colonial Coupe 1375 

Model "C" Standard Touring Car 1375 




REO 



REO-PACIFIC COMPANY 
Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Model H. P. Price 

5-Passenger 30-35 h. p $1295 

2-Passenger 30-35 h. p 1295 

1% Ton Truck 30-35 h. p 1976 




AUTO SALES CO. 
418 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

"40" 6-Pass, Touring Car $2000 

"40" 4-Pass. Torpedo 2000 

"40" Limousine 3000 

M Special 5-Pass. Touring 1900 

Model R 5-Pass. Touring 1500 

"88" Model W 5-Pass. Touring 1350 

"88" Mode! r:x Roadster 1460 



WINTON SIX 



THEWINTON MOTOR CAR CO. 



S. E. Cor. Sutter and Van Ness 



O. B. Factory 



Boaditm tajoo 

Tor Tonneau 3000 
S-Pass. Touring 3000 



LandauK't 



1600 



drive with the center control, which makes the driver's seat as 
accessible to one hand as to the other. The same clutch is used 
on the new "Six" as has been so successfully in use on former 
Haynes models. 

The unit type of power plant is used in the new models, in 
which the motor, clutch and transmission are assembled as 
one. Those who have seen the latest creation of the Haynes 
factory say that it is one of the handsomest models so far sent 
out to the Coast. 



American Underslung In Australian Race 

In the capital to capital run, the 573 mile classic between 
Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, an American Underslung 
car, driven by A. V. Turner, of the firm of Stanton, Turner & 
Company, not only made the run successfully, but clipped. off 



45 minutes from the previous time of 19 hours and 47 minutes, 
a record that had stood for years. As this race is over roads 
that, for the greater part of the distance, are anything but good, 
the performance of the American Underslung is all the more 
noteworthy. 

* » * 

Overland Dealer a Nimrod 

A party of fourteen people in three cars left the Overland 
Agency, J. W. Leavitt & Company, last week, bound for Clover- 
dale. In the cars were J. W. Leavitt, A. D. Plugoff and Fred 
West and their wives and children. The three cars will follow 
the northern route via San Rafael. Petaluma to Cloverdale, 
vhich will be the tour headquarters during the vacation. The 
ry all around Cloverdale will be toured and photographed 
;:e the party returns ore month hence. 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



Now Anntt®M®lbSIl@ R® Afcraftaisis 



New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
June 28th. The number of automobile licenses authorized to 
date for the State of California is 110,059. 

MILNE, D. G., 210 Ellis St., S. F G. M. C. 

BIEDERMANN, FRANK A., 274 Ninth Ave., S. F Hudson 

PURITY ICE CREAM CO .,366 Guerrero St.. S. F Packard 

COLLUFY, C. R.. 150 Ricardo St., S. F Studebaker 

SPRING, JOHN H., 631 Market St., S. F Franklin 

EMPORIUM, THE, 835 Market St., S, F I. H. C. 

FEIX, REV. HENRY S., 1133 O'Farrell St.. S. F. .'. Ford 

BRUNER, FRANK J., 772 Charter Oak St., S. F Mitchell 

SCHIRO, DR. C, 905 Union St., S. F Chalmers 

DAVIS, R. C, 223 Davis St., s. F Overland 

FOX, G. A., Sol Golden Gate avenue, S. F Overland 

SHARPLES SEPARATOR CO.. 420 Mission St., S. F Cartercar 

CHADDOCK, J. L., 2917 Benvenue avenue, Berkeley Pierce 

ZEATS, A. E., Pailier Ford 

HILL, E. D., Mendota Oldsmobile 

PRICHARD, W. F.. Klink, Tulare County Ford 

RICHMOND, W. D., Fresno ...Ford 

WALL, D. L., Fresno Ford 

CRAMMER, W. S., Fresno Ford 

MAXON, B. D., R. F. D.. Box 6, Fresno Ford 

WHITMORE, L. H., Ceres Ford 

FLANNIGAN, J., Cecil Hotel, Napa Ford 

ANDRUS, J. R., 1612 48th avenue, S. F Ford 

COOK. F. E., Fresno Simplex 

WALUREN, L. A., 1024 S. San Joaquin St., Stockton . . .• Metz 

CITY TRUCK £ TRANSFER CO., San Jose Reliance 

GUGGLEMETTI, L. S.. 343 Main St., Petaluma Ford 

GAMBOR1NI, S. G., 343 Main St., Petaluma Ford 

I.EXSCH, HANS C, R. F. 1 J. No. 2. Petaluma I'm d 

STANDIFORD. A. N.. Modesto Studebaker 

STONE, J. T., Berros Velie 

LYNN. JACK, 208 Front St., Antioch Reo 

RIST, B. F., Lonoak Overland 

WOOKEY, A. J., Chico Studebaker 

HOLLINGSAYORTH, P. S., Santa Rosa Overland 

BRUSH, DANIEL, Occidental, Sonoma County Overland 

AUSTIN, HERBERT W.. R. F. Ii.. Santa Rosa Overland 

JEFFREY. C. L„ Cotatl Overland 

ERWIN BROS., 703 Fourth St., Santa Rosa I. II. C. 

WOODWARD, MRS. L. L., R. F. D., Santa Rosa Kissel 

LASKY, B. E.. 128 Jordan Ave., S. F Velie 

DRYER, WM. F., 320 London St., S. F Rambler 

STERNS, MINNIE B., 56 Twelfth St., s. F Rambler 

MARTENS, C. 6525 College Ave., Oakland Ford 

WANGERIN. J. D., 462 37th St., Oakland Ford 

HOEPNER. C. P., 1631 Sherman St.. Alameda Ford 

FOSS CO., F. W., 21S1 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley Knox-Martin 

MILLER, A. W., National City Oakland 

MAILER, J. C. S57 Third St.. Santa Rosa Haynes 

WANGENHEIM, A. L.. 2304 B St., Bakersfield Ford 

SMITH. MRS. W. R., Delano Pord 

BAKERSFIELD ABSTRACT CO., Bakersfleld Ford 

OLLAGHIER, FRANK, 326 Grant St., San Jose Ford 

LEGGETT, W. G., El Cenlro Pord 

WRAMPLER, C. F., Spreckels Buick 

ANDERSON, F. T.. El Centro Ford 

DOUGHERTY, C. F., Porterville Bulck 

LEAHY, JAMES F., Rudgear Merle Co., S, P Rambler 

BAUMGARDNER, WM. I.. Boulder Crack Pord 

GRANT, MRS. EMMA. 15 Claj Si . Santa Cruz Ford 

WILLIAMS, R. W., box L83, H Stu.ll.ak.i 

BUSHA, H. F., 102 1-2 W. A SI . Ontario Ford 

GOELZ, CHAS.. Sonora Overland 

KING, C. M„ 1229 Seventh St., Sacramento Gramm 

REED, A. M., Lompoc Bulck 

NILSEN, O., Fifth and A Sts., Eureka Maxwell 

WTNKLER, J. S.. American Cash Store, Hamilton Overland 

EDE, CHAS. W.. Loyalton Pord 

SMITH, J. P., Grand Island, Colusa County Studebaker 

HAATFTELD, WM., Thermalito. Butt! County Studebakei 

WHITE BROTHERS. Sanitarium, Napa County Pord 

WALLACE, V. A., Pope Valley. Napa Count] .' Pord 

McCLAIN & WELCH. St. Helena. X. lounty Ford 

MUNSON, B. E., Crow's Landing Klssel-Kai 

SHARP, I. T., Taft. Kern County Studebaker 

MURPHY, JOHN F., Port Costa Fori 

HOLLINGSWORTH, R. B.. 349 Locust st,. Sacramento 

GUILFORD, C. E., Hotel Land, Sacramento Ov rtand 

CAMP, E. J., Florin Studebakei 

KOHN, N. L., Placerville Oakland 

LAZAR, WM., 405 Jackson St., S. F K'rit 

KOHN, E. V., Granada Hotel. S. F Simplex 



MITCHELL, ROBERT C. Wells Fargo Bank Bldg., S. F F6"rd 

GALE, M. A„ Kohl Bldg., S. F Oakland 

MBESCHEN, FRANK M., 314 Devisadero St.. S. F Garford 

BELL, NATHAN L.. care Cuyler Lee, s. F Packard 

HOWARD, W. B.i 405 Van Ness Ave.. S. F Ford 

EDWARDS, J. H„ 715 Duboce Ave.. S. F Velie 

KUERZELL, OTTO C, 741 Broadway, Oakland Overland 

CHAVE, M. A., 617 Kearny St., S. F Chalmers 

LANGLEY, CLAUDE L., 2105 Intrant St.. Berkeley Overland 

ROWLAND, CLARK, Constantia, Lassen County Pope-Hartford 

SULLIVAN. .1. M., Rio Vista Ford 

OSTBRMAN, T., Wallace, Calaveras County Reo 

AMAKAL, ANTONE S., R. F. 1 >. No. 2". Newark Hupmobile 

PARKE, E.. Sonora Moon 

FEELE1'. JAMES, Red Bluff Overland 

HODGES, W. E., Upper Lake, Lake County Ford 

McCUNE, W. D., Tehama Oakland 

AVILLA, M. L., Decoto, Alameda County Ford 

TORP, I. W., Newman Ford 

MEESB, GEO. C, Klngsburg Ford 

WILLIAMS, C. E., Hardwlck, I Ity Ford 

BRESSLER, M. P.. Box 1096 Fresno '. .Buick 

BURRIS, B.. Proberta, Tehama Cc ty Ford 

QUICK, G. E., Ben Hur, Mariposa County Detrolter 

COWAN, F. J., Groville Overland 

BEAN, JOHN, Orovllle Overland 

POWELL, GEO. J., Morgan 1 1 ill Overland 

LIGUORI, JOHN, Agner , Kissel 

FARNSWORTH, CHAS., Winb . County Ford 

CRAVALLO, .1.. 400 M St., San:, Cadlllai 

SULLIVAN, GEORGE IL. Weed Overland 

MAIN, C. G., R. F. D. No. 8 Bo L'urlock R. C. H. 

HATES, J. M., 2211 N. California St., stork Reo 

GIBSON, J. M., Gumda, Yolo County Ford 

FISHER. R. E.. Woodland. Yolo County Ford 

ROBERTS. R, E.. Woodland. Yolo Count: Ford 

LAWSON, HOWARD, Woodland. Yolo County Ford 

BALL, J. W., Oakdale, Yolo County Imperial 

ADAMS, CIL\S. II., 2727 M Si Sacran nto Ford 

ROTH, W. P., Hotel Land, Sacrament Ford 

PACIFIC HARDWARE & ST I :;. I. CO - F Lippai d-Stevai t 

MODEL STEAM BAKERY' CO Fn Studebaker 

HOFFMAN, WM. HARRY, 1657 Market St, S. F White 

HEISKELL. J. M.. Clovis Great \\ 

NEVADA CITY STEAM LAUNDRY, Nevada City Ford 

BEDFORD. ROBERT, Gl Ford 

HARRIS. I., 138 Georgia St., Vallejo Studebakei 

LEE. WM., Dunsmuir k] 

BERG. T. L„ Oleander Ford 

MAIN, C. W., R. F. Ii., Arlington Buick 

TRACY, O. E., Box 8. Cbico Cadillac 

KKNOX, O. 11., Inea Oii Co Ford 

GRUWELIi, J. E., Coallnga '. Ford 

MXKALICH, TOM, Lmadoi Cits Buick 

HARMES, DR. F. A., Gait Ford 

WALKER, WM. c. on 22.1 si Sacramento Ford 

THEILEN. J. W., 1003 E St., Sacramento Ford 

McENERNEY, WM., Halt ■ Ford 

WHITAKER, H. A.. Gait Ford 

THORN, JOHN F., Overland 

LEVY. J. M. i S. F American 

HY.MAN. II. M., 22::" Sacramento St., S. P " 

SAMSON IRON WORKS, in Markel St.. s. F Oi 

mi.'i.i'aiiv, i: E. i rnia St.. s P Lozler 

FREY, A. J., 384 Fl I Bid : ' Chalmers 

JENNINGS, tiios,, nil Bryanl St., S. •■■ Reo 

BIRTCH. DR. F. W., St, Luke's Hospital, S P Haynes 

(VAX.CGTT, PRANK 1'.. 397 Fill e St., S. r Haynes 

HEALY TIBBITTS CONS CO., S !•' Knox-Martin 

WATSON TOWEL SUPPLY CO. 3374 Mission SI : P Utco 

ADAMS, A. i"'.. 3i.li Fair Oaks St., S. i Oakland 

HUMBOLDT LAND & DEV. CO., Securitj Bank Bldg., Oakland. B 

ANDERSON, i: . i" 50 i; md Oakland 

DIECKMANN, J. II. . 1076 SOth md Wlnton 

ii.w. .1. S., Palm inn, :Iand .* Studi 

WATBRHOl si;, b. i... 249 Mather St., Oakland Ford 

ii 1ES, W. B., i ■ mi da Studebaker 

BROWN, II. II. . 286 Mountail nt Haynes 

PELTON, ALLEN E 507 Ho ward k.vi San Leandro M 

KIPERS, A. H.. \\ Hand Studebaker 

G. S. PERRELL, Oilfields Ford 

HUTCHINSON, PRANK, I: Ford 

GREENWOOD, 10. P., Mountain View 

ENGELS, A., Mountain View C 

PORTMAN, A., 700 Palm St., San Jose Pord 

CONKLING, G. H., 842 Fourth SI S " Pord 

THOMASSON, .Ml:s. X. K., Chico, Butte County Ci I ' 

BARBER, E. ii. . US Sat I ise 

J. C. AINSLi-.v PKG, CO., Campbell Pord 

w iiitl. B. W., 632 B St., Marysvllli L H. C. 

GARLICK, MARY A.. Stockton "■ 

FORE, CHARLES, Lodl Overland 

SWIFT, NELLO, Stockton 

SCHOFIELD. J. M.. Stockton Overland 

STANDARD Oil Pullei 

CORDU LAN) 'CO tfai e 

CHAPMAN, R. C, 127 Main St., Cbicu . Carl cai 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



CALIFORNIA DEVELOPMENT. 

The Annua! Report of the California Development Board 
for 1913, "California Resources and Possibilities," has just 
come to hand. It is a volume full of carefully prepared data on 
the State of California. No better handbook for the person in- 
terested in California is available. 

The report contains notes on population of the State, counties 
and cities, facts about financial conditions, and a statement of 
foreign trade through the port of San Francisco. The bank 
clearings of San Francisco increased in 1912, 10 per cent; and 
those of Los Angeles 23 per cent over those of the previous 
year. During the past five years the production of butter in 
the irrigated districts has grown from 17,000,000 to 30,000,000 
pounds. The acreage of wheat is decreasing, and the area of 
those crops which require more cultivation cind consequently 
tend to smaller acreages is increasing. 

New crops which have attained sufficient importance to 
merit mention are rice, cotton, flax and hemp. The California 
raisin crop broke its record of former years with the production 
of 85,000 tons. Thirteen million gallons of wine were ex- 
ported by sea to 33 different countries out of a total wine and 
brandy production of 42,000,000 gallons. The citrus crops 
totaled 40,000 carloads. 



To be concerned about one's health is the beginning of 

ill-health. And anything irritating, either physical or mental, is 
certain to promote poor health. Ease and well-being are the 
surest agents of perfect health preservation. All of which leads 
to the unqualified statement that the wearer of flannel or woolen 
undergarments cannot and never will be absolutely healthy. 
First, because both are irritants both mentally and physically; 
and second, they act as a poultice which is non-absorptive 
and tends to clog the action of the pores of the skin. Years of 
practical research led Dr. Deimel to combine a weave of linen 
with another fibre in the production of a mesh which would be 
warm, and at the same time comfortable, remove concern as to 
one's health, and at the same time guarantee it. Hence, Deimel 
Linen-Mesh Underwear, which is being sold in San Francisco 
at 176 Sutter street, near Kearny. 



■ The Hayes-Brown Realty Company, in the Westbank 

Building, report considerable activity in the real estate market, 
and in demands for homes, despite the supposed tightness of 
the money market. The firm, making, as it does, a specialty 
of listing only personally inspected properties, passed upon by 
themselves as being worth the price demanded, is meeting with 
even more satisfactory results than they expected. The firm 
is young, notwithstanding the long experience both members 
have had in the realty business, and their up-to-date and novel 
methods of protecting the interests of their clients have proven 
a pronounced success. 



Mrs. Strongmind — And for what are you incarcerated 

here, my poor man? The Prisoner — I married a New Woman. 
Mrs. Strongmind (astonished) — Impossible! They couldn't 
put you in jail for that. The Prisoner — But they did! I mar- 
ried a new woman, and the old woman I already had kicked 
about it, and put me here for bigamy. — Ex. 

Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Dr. Byron Haines, Dentist, has resumed p 

ling. S. W. 



Occidental Hotel. Santa Rosa. 



■ 'r.mi ^nn Frs M claw 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER ANT CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott, ?1 Sutter Street. San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 3591. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cat., Post-office as wond-clnss mall matter. 

New York OfTlee — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising)— S. I.. Carman, representative. 15S Fifth Ave. 
ago Office — Jno. A. Tenney. 4SC Peoples Gas Building. Chicago. 

Tloston Office — Charles S. Parr, tit Tremont Tf mple. 

London Office— George Street * Co . 30 Comhlll. E C England. 

Matter Intended for publication In the current number of the SAN 
NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER Should 
be sent to the office 5 p. m. Wedne- 

Subscription Rates (Including postage)— 1 year. 14.00; t months. 1111 
Foreign— 1 year. MOO: « months. ISIS. 




"Best in The World!'' 



Add a Tea- 
spoonful to a 
} Cup of Salad 
Dressing. 

An Appetizer. 



LEA & PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

Have a bottle on the 
table as well as in the 
kitchen. Once used, the 
whole family will have it. 

An indispensable relish for Soups, 
Fish, Roasts, Steaks, Game, Gravies 
and Chafing Dish Cooking. 

Sold by Grocers Everywhere. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 



PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to this 
found In Room 424, Flood Building. 



city, and is now to be 



INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 



DENTISTS. 
D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. 
to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. 



W. A. Bryant, M. I 
tatlon hours: 10 a. r 
Telephone West 1039 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St. 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 



Consul- 
2941 Wasnlngton street. 



now at room 408 



ATTORN t ■ S-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bids.. 830 Market St- Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St., above Bush, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 601. 





MAYERL E'S GERMAN EYEWATER 

Is a perfectly harmless eye remedy 

for strained, Inflamed, sore, watery 

painful, burning, gmarting. blurring, 

itchy eyes: r*& glu^y or heavy 

injured eyes, indispensable for mechanic? exposing their eyes 

to the wind, sun and dust. At druggists BOc; by mail 06C, direct from 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Opticnn and Optometrist 

960 Market St., Ssn Francisco 
Charter Member of Americas Auoctatioa ot Optictam < Established 18 Years) 

Msrerle '• Antiseptic Fyrglsss Wipe rsH chemirai cloth I. large size.1 for 25c 



OPPOSITE MISSION STREET 
ENTRANCE TO EMPORIUM 

P. E. O'HAIR & CO. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

SOLD DIRECT TO YOU 

357 MISSION ST. Phone Sutter 1813 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 5, 1913. 



W. L. 



GROWALL CO. 

— TAILORS — 

Announce the addition to their tailoring business in the 
Mutual Savings Bank Building a Custom Shirtmaking De- 
partment on the second floor, one floor below their tailoring 
business. 

MR. HOWARD BLACK 

for a great many years the leading shirt maker of San Fran- 
cisco, is associated and in charge of this department. 

The shirting line will consist of the highest grade import- 
ed materials of exclusive designs at satisfactory prices. 



REMEMBER! ! ! 

WE WRITE 
Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automo- 
bile, Plate Glass, Burglary, Elevator, and Health 
and Accident Insurance. 

PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 



San Francisco, Cal. 



C. H. CRAWFORD, President 



1863 



1913 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $8,650,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Aek any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Dinsmore J. C. Meassdorffer James W. Dean 



GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 



312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 2283 
Home Phone C 2899 



The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OP HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1860. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total Assets 7,735,110 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,266,021 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building ... g an Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 



Capital, $400,000 



Assets, Over a Million 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best in the West) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen 's 
Collective. Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green, . President.; Marshal A. Frank, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Carl G. Brown, Secretary; F. P, Deering, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, 
General Manager Accident and Health Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 



Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PEASE. PrMident 589, S91. 593 Market Si. 




The best «nd 

uronacit 
Garden Hon 

Guirantetd to 

itind 700 Ibt 

Pressor* 

TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

Si a Friociico 




UNSVKAM 




The argument of those who favor 
Non-Agency Plan Fails. State insurance is that the price will 
be appreciably reduced, owing to 
the fact that busin'ess will be done more or less over the coun- 
ter, and policyholders will benefit by the difference, as they 
will not have to pay the agent's commission. 

In this connection, it is interesting to note the results of fol- 
lowing out the non-agency plan as shown in the case of the 
London Equitable Life. It has been shown in the figures re- 
cently published that the number of policies and the amount of 
insurance has been substantially reduced within the past few 
years since the London Equitable decided upon doing away 
with agents. 

Despite the fact that the general financial condition of the 
company is prosperous, the falling off of business is highly dis- 
couraging, and goes to prove that insurance must be sold. Peo- 
ple do not go hunting for it, and must be coaxed. 



Rider Forms. 



In the future, "rider forms" attach- 
ing to insurance policies issued in 
Washington must conform to fixed 
standards in the respective cases, according to State Insurance 
Commissioner Fishback. These riders are special provisions 
relative to when and under what conditions policies are valid, 
as, for example relative to the wiring of building properties for 
lighting or heating purposes. This feature is made mention of 
in the Commissioner's annual report. The report also calls at- 
tention to a provision of the 1911 law not always recognized, 
but which provides that the company issuing and paying an in- 
surance policy shall be responsible for the payment of taxes 
on the property in question, if it be burned after March 15th 
of any year. This does not mean that the company must pay 
the taxes, but that it must do so unless it sees that they are 
paid before settling for the loss on the policy. The law covers 
delinquent taxes as well as those accrued for the year in 
question. 

* * * 

It is predicted that there will be a 
Insurance Famine. decided insurance famine in the 

State of Missouri owing to the Orr 
Law which recently forced fire insurance companies to suspend 
business. The insurance men stopped writing insurance in 
advance of the going into effect of the law, because they did 
not care to take any risks of being held liable to its drastic 
provisions. Their pretest was of no avail, and the law went 
into effect on the 23d of June last. 

The real famine is looked for shortly. It is expected that 
the first serious effect will be noticed by the middle of the pres- 
ent month when grain will be seeking storage and insurance, 
and will be unable to get it. 

* * * 

According to the annual report of 
Says Companies Insurance Inspector Revelle, of Mis- 

Not Justified. souri, which was recently handed to 

the Governor, the action of the in- 
surance men of the State with reference to th'j Orr law was not 
at all justified. He states that insured property to the value of 



OLD FORESTER 

Don't Simply Ask for Whisky— Ask for 
OLD FORESTER 

It is Straight Old Whisky, direct from Distillery in 
Kentucky, to You. Take a bottle home and treat 
your friends right. 

For Sale By All Dealers 

KENTUCKY MERCANTILE CO. 



488 Sutter St. San Francisco 



Phone Sutter 4031 



July 5, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



$5,838,250 was destroyed by fire in 1912. with uninsured prop- 
erty burned valued at over $2,500,000. Mr. Revelle estimates 
that two-thirds of the fires were preventable. He urges the 
creation of a fire marshal department and the enforcement of 
more stringent building requirements, and recommends that 
the next legislature give the insurance superintendent broad 
discretionary power as to the licensing of insurance agents and 
the revocation of their licenses. Mr. Revelle devotes a large 
part of his report to a discussion of the suspension of fire in- 
surance by the companies. He asserts that th>»y are not justified 
in their action, insisting that the Orr amendments did not ren- 
der the old anti-trust law any more stringent than when the 
companies formerly operated under it. 

* * * 

The Massachusetts Bonding has begun the issuance of resi- 
dence burglary policies in minimum amounts of $100, liability 
for money being excluded, and full co-insurance clause being 
required on jewels, watches, wearing apparel and furs. The 
company states, however, that it will not issue the policies in 
California, where the experience on burglary business has been 
unsatisfactory. 

Portland commission merchants have commenced a suit to 
test the validity of the new Oregon law requiring commission 
dealers to report to the State Railroad Commission and file a 
bond, guaranteeing fulfillment of their obligations to produce 
growers. 

* * * 

S. K. Crawford, assistant to the president of the American 
Automobile Insurance Company of St. Louis, is a San Fran- 
cisco visitor this week. 

* « * 

The Chicago Bonding and Surety is charged by members o£ 
the Surety Association of America with cutting rates on build- 
ing and loan association bonds in Indiana. 

* • * 

The National Surety has issued a statement to the effect that 
it is not a party to any negotiations for a merger with or sale 
to any other company. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa. 
shell fish to ordor. Moderate prices. 



Cafe ntt»' ;ih> and 



Phonti 



( Sut 
) Ho 
< Ho 



Sutter 1672 
otni C 3970 
me C 4781. 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner In the City with Wine. Si.o». Benquet Halli end Private 

Dining Roome. Mualc Every Evening. 
362 Deary Street San Francleco 



J. B. Pod J. Beraei C. Mailhrhuau C. l.alaane L. Coutard 

BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT IVF.RV EVENING 

415-421 Buih St.. San Francisco (Above KearaO Fsrhaoro. Dootias 2411 



Nothing but the Best Sened at 
J\ LES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Special 50c Luncheon and $1 Dinner With Music 
Served in Ladies' Grill as well as Main Dining Hall 



BLANCO'S 



OTarrell and Larkln 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeinaj the 
finest cafe in America 



DOMINICAN COLLEGE 
SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 

4* it* » 

A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco.' Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



SNELL SEMINARY 

2721 Channing Way. Berkeley- 
Boarding and day school. 
Founded 1874. From pri- 
mary to college entrance, 
August 12, 1913 

EDNA SNELL POULSON ADELAIDE SMITH 

Principals 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 
Rifle Range. Thirty-sixth Academic Year begins 
August 18th, 1913. Cadets may enter any time 
of the year. Summer camp on Eel River, June 
"to August. 

Principals 
REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School PA h°^l° 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mill). 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurtt 
for younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. B«sft 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1625 California Street 



Ufa ClaxaMM 
Oar and Nlatht 



IlluatroUnr 
Sketching 
Pain tlnr 



MANZANITA HALL 

■;i of timo. 
3end 



VALUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

SS FIRST STREE ^ANCISCO 

Phones: Kearny 392 J 1538 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WISH 




tnm-AND* sumo ksobc 




WITTER SPRINGS 



Lake County's Finest Hotel 

NOW OPEN 

WILL BE OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND. 
HIGH CLASS IN EVERY DETAIL A 
PLACE FOR PERFECT REST AND 
HEALTH. FOR IMFORMATION AND 
RESERVATIONS ADDRESS 



Mrs. W. F. Morris, Hotel Victoria, 
Bush and Stockton Sts., S. F. 



HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND 

COTTAGES 

Incorporated 

Renovated and fully equipped. Permanent and 
first-class management. All modern conveniences 
and amusements. 

Address "Manager" 

Hotel Den Lomond 

Ben Lomond Santa Cruz County. Cal. 



YOSEMITE VALLEY 

A Vacation Ground 

Season 1913 Opens Early 

Yosemite grows more popular each year. 
Thousands visit It as a sight-seeing trip. 
Other thousands spend their Vacations there 
and live for weeks amid its grandeurs. 

YOSEMITE THE PLACE FOR REST AND 
RECREATION. 

Daily outings to points of interest. Jolly 
times around the evening camp flres. Hotels 
and boarding camps for those who wish, and 
private camping under its pines for those 
who prefer this way. Ask any ticket agent 
for Yosemite Outing Folder. A BEAUTIFUL 
YOSEMITE SOUVENIR BOOKLET. Mailed 
on receipt of one dollar. A gem of the print- 
ing art. 32 pages in full colors. Contains no 
advertisements. Address, 




YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY, 



Merced, Gal. 




HIGHLAND SPRINGS 

Lake County, Cal. 

The home of the automobile and tourists. Queen of 
all American watering places. Weather and roads un- 
surpassed; most accessible of all Lake County resorts, 
only 14 miles from Pieta, N. W. P. R. R., iy a hours auto 
stage ride, and only 5^2 hours from San Francisco. Won- 
derful natural hot mineral baths; finest swimming pool 
in the State, supplied with natural mineral water, con- 
stant flow day and night; waters are very beneficial in 
stomach troubles, rheumatism, liver and kidney com- 
plaints; expert masseur; finest table in the county; per- 
fect analysis of all waters. Get booklet. Finest improved 
springs in Lake County; all electric lighted. All kinds 
of amusements, and weekly excursions on Great Clear 
Lake. Dancing, bowling, tennis, croquet and games 
every day and night. Further information, get booklet: 
Peck-Judah, 687 Market St., or write direct: Highland 
Springs P. O., Lake County, Cal. 

OLAF NELSON, PROP. 

Thos. F. Chatfield, Manager 





(Mwe\ 
^Palace_Hotel\ 

M Avenue des Champs Elysecs ■ 
# PARIS, FRANCE 1 

m An exclusive reside] tor Ameri-'M 

M tun Families. Unrivaled situation m 

m within easy reach ol shopping and m 

m theatre district. Entirely renovated. H 

■ Under Direct Management of M 

International Sleeping Car m 

Company m 

Upon request hotel porters will m 
1 meet American passengers at U 
1 -union upon arrival at Paris B 
1 and take entire charge of £ 
m baggage formalities. m 
m Descriptive booklets mailed J 

M free an application to ^^^j^^ 
m New York Office ^^r^^^L 

% 281 Fifth Avenue^W J\2% | 
^^ Corner 30th Si. ^^^ \ tWP M 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

EDSON BROS., Props. 

A resort for pleasure and health, also ideal for hunting and fishing. 
Is situated in Siskiyou County, Cal, on highway to Klamath Falls 
and Crater Lake. Good roads, garage, gasoline. Particulars write 
W. C. BROWN, Manager, Beswick, Cal. 



TALLAC, Lake Tahoe 

Most scenic resort on Tahoe; 14 small lakes nearby; 
fine livery; automobile road now open via Placerville; 
State road; much the shortest and best route; auto stage 
now running between Tallac and Placerville ; June fishing 
always best. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK, Tallac, Cal. 




flimm xjiteb «m 




HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles South from San Francisco. Finest all 
grass Golf Course in California. Daily rates $5, $6, 
$7 per day. Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL MONTE, under same 
management. Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 

Special monthly rates. 

CASTLE CRAGS 

In the yellow pine forests of the Sacramento River. 
Rates $18 to $24 per week. Western Union, Wells- 
Fargo and Southern Pacific offices. Good fishing; 
riding horses; automobiles. For further information 
and folders address 

MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS. CAL. 
Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 



Anderson Springs 

4 Miles from Mlddletown. On the most beautiful fishing stream 
In California. 

NOW OPEN. 

Hot steam baths. Cold sulphur and sour springs. $10 per week. 
Children half price. 

Good automobile road. Special attention to automobilists. 

Address: MISS ROSE ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

P. S. — Received gold medal for best springs in Lake County. 



Brookdale Hotel 

In the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains, only 2\k hours from 
S. P. White sulphur water springs on hotel grounds. No wind; 
no fog. Climate ideal. TROUT FISHING, the best In 10 years. For 
information and booklet, write MRS. M. FAIRLEE, Prop., Brook- 
dale, or Peck-Judah's. 



AGUA CAL1ENTE SPRINGS 

HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT. NATURAL HOT 
SULPHUR WATER. 
Swimming tank, 50 bath tubs. Hotel strictly modern: excellent 
■ervice: rates reasonable: no staging. Send for Information and 
booklet to THEODOR RICHARDS, proprietor. Agua Callente. 
Sonoma County. Cal.. or Feck-Judah, 6S7 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Good auto roads direct to the springs. 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

California's Ideal Health and Pleasure Resort. 

Only two hours' ride from Sfl id Bu Cities on the 

X \\ P. or S. P. EL EL Concrete Swimming Tank: Tub. Flunge 

and I'll' its. Bath House 50 feet 

from Hotel and Cottages, Rates reasonable. Fine table supplied 

I urn, Electric lights; hot and cold mineral 

water in c\ erv room. Buy ticket t' 1 Fetl n. For 

other Intern ITTERS, Fet- 

iounty Cal. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

3 Miles from Middletown. 
NEAREST LAKE COTJNTT RESORT TO BAN FRANCISCO. 

Itgntful run through a beautiful country. 

Automobile supplies fet-pt; ordinary repAirs; wash 

rack. 

Hot and Cold Tub Baths. Showers. Natural Hot Mineral Water. 

Plunge. Swimming Tank 

EXCELLENT TABLE. 



NOW OPEN 

SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 

CASA del REY COTTAGE CITY CASINO 

PLUNGE SCENIC RAILWAY HIPPODROME 
Surf Bathing Dancing Golfing 

Only all year green turf fair greens in California. For 
reservations Casa del Rey or Cottage City, Address, 

E. S. deWOLFE, Manager 



VACATION 1913 

A Handbook of 

SUMMER RESORTS 

Along the Line of the 

Northwestern Pacific 
Railroad 

This book tells by picture and word of the many 
delightful places in Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake 
and Humboldt counties in which to spend your Vaca- 
tion—Summer Resorts, Camping Sites, Farms and 
Town Homes. 

Copies of "Vacation 1913" may be obtained at City 
Ticket Offices of Southern Pacific and Santa Fe com- 
panies; also at 874 Market Street (Flood Building), 
Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or on application to 

J. J. GEARY, G. F. and P. A. 
808 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Ocean Shore Railroad 

"Reaches the Beaches" 



NEW SERVICE s " tSL 

YOUR SUNDAY TRIP — 



r» For 



DEPOT 12TH AND MISSION STS. I N RANDALL. Oacrd Agcoi 



SEIGLER SPRINGS 

Extensively impr hotel rebuilt; new stone bath-houses; 

hot sulphur, iron i baths; magnesia and lithia springs. 

:;$. For information, ad- 
ngs. Lake County. Cai 



{ p 









The apparel oft proclaims the man " THE ECONOMY SYSTEM 



Therefore keep it nice— Practice Economy in 
the Care of Your Clothes. Save time and closet 
space by using the 




The NEW BALLBEARING Closet Set 



Mak.es the Smallest Clothes Closet Commodious 

Every garment is kept immaculate and accessible. No confusion, no disorder — 
nothing out of place. The parts are of the best workmanship and highest finish. 
The hangers are carried on "ball-bearings," balls sliding into tubular arm and 
emerging from either side. There are no hooks to damage or tear. 




Economy Tubular Arm No. 3. 
Bessemer steel nickel plate. Length 
7 l / 2 inches. Each, 25c 




Economy Tubular Arm No. 6. 
Similar to No. 3. 1 I inches long. 
Each, 50c 



i 



Economy Trousers Hanger No. 9. 
Very effectjveand high-class. Hangs 
skirts also. Each, 25c 




Economy Suit Hanger No, 1 1. 
Smooth surfaced, hardwood, nickel 
trimmings, wire keeper holds trou- 
sers on bar. Dozen, $2.00 



"Up-to-Date" Hotels and Apartment Houses are 
installing the ECONOMY SYSTEM because they find 
that the most desirable guests or tenants are attracted 
by them. 

Fact is, they convert any ordinary closet into a 
most useful and ideal place for either a Lady's or 
Gentleman's Wardrobe. 

Economy sets are sold at the following prices: 

Set No. 9—1 arm No. 3, 3 hangers No. 9 $1.00 

Set No. 11— 1 arm No. 6, 6 suit hangers No. 11 . . . 1.50 
Set No. 15—1 arm No. 6, 3 each; hangers No. 11 and 18 2.00 
Set No. 18 — 1 arm No. 6, 6 combination hangers No. 18 2.50 



Our Salesmen will be pleased to show and 
explain these sets to you or write for leaflet to 



Palace Hardware Company 





581 Market Street 



San Francisco 



DISTRIBUTORS 



Economy Suit Hanger No. 18 
Same as No. 1 I except the bar, a 
pair oi clamps — to hold skirts or 
trousers. Dozen, $4.00 



The old style hook hangers can be used on 
New Tubular Arms, but we recommend 
hangers with ball above all others. 



the 
the 




T2> 



HSTEM CI 

£%B1|T, ■. CHICAGO. *U^ 




*■ 




Winners of the Panama-Paeiflc Road Race from Los Angeles to Sacramento, July 4, 1913. 1. Car No. 7, Fiat, Barney Old- 
held driver, finished third. J. Car No. 9. Fiat, F. Verbcck driver, finished first. 3. Car No. 34. National, C. F. Stitt driver, 
finished seventh. 4. Car No. 45, Buick. E. C. Waterman dri; .1 second. 5. Simplex, Omar Toft driver, finished eighth. 

6. Cadillac. F. J. Beaadei driver, finished tenth. —Photos by Arthur Spaulding Co. 



STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 



OF 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 



HIBERNIA BANK 

(A CORPORATION) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Franciscol 

DATED JUNE 30, 1913 



ASSETS. 

1— Bonds of the United States ($5,350,000.00), 
of the State of California and Municipali- 
ties thereof ($5,886,400.00), of the State 
of New York ($1,650,000.00), the actual 
value of which is $13,424,757.10 

2 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin 

and Checks 2,115,596.20 

3— Miscellaneous Bonds ($5,519,000.00), the ac- 
tual value of which is 5,537,726.33 

$21,078,079.63 
They are : 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,000.00), 
"Southern Pacific Branch Railway Com- 
pany of California 6 per cent bonds" 
($340,000.00), "Southern Pacific Com- 
pany, San Francisco Terminal 4 per cent 
Bonds" ($150,000.00), "Western Pacific 
Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($213,000.00), "San Francisco and San 
Jcaquin Valley Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds" ($120,000.00), "Northern 
California Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern Railway 
Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" 
($120,000.00), "Market Street Railway 
Company First Consolidated Mortgage 5 
per cent Bonds" ($728,000.00), "Los An- 
geles Pacific Railroad Company of Cali- 
fornia Refunding 5 per cent Bonds" ($4C0, 
000.00), "Los Angeles Railway Company 
of California 5 per cent Bonds" ($334,- 
000.00), "The Omnibus Cable Company 6 
per cent Bonds" ($167,000.00), "Sutter 
Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($150,000.00), "Gough Street Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($20,000.00), 
"Ferries and Cliff House Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds" ($6,000.00), "San 
Francisco, Oakland & San Jose Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($5,000.00), 
"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent 
Bonds" ($1,410,000.00), "San Francisco 
Gas and Electric Company 4% per cent 
Bonds" ($547,000.00), "Los Angeles Gas 
& Electric Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($100,000.00), "Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany 4 per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00), 
"German House Association 6 per cent 
Bonds" ($100,000.00.) 
4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 34,012,623.27 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows : They are all ex- 
isting Contracts, owned by said Corpora- 
tion, and are payable to it at its office, 
which is situated at the corner of Market, 
McAllister and Jones streets, in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and the payment thereof is se- 
cured by First Mortgages on Real Estate 



within this State, and the States of Oregon 
and Nevada. Said Promissory Notes are 
kept and held by said Corporation at its 
said office, which is its principal place of 
business, and said Notes and debts are 
there situated. 

S — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 249,400.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows : They are all exist- 
ing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and are payable to it at its office, which is 
situated as aforesaid; and the payment 
thereof is secured by pledge and hypothe- 
cation of Bonds of Railroad and Quasi- 
Public Corporations and other securities. 

fi — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 

County of San Francisco ($1,910,393.99), 

and in the Counties of Santa Clara ($12,- 

488.52), and Alameda ($2,779.15), in this 

State, the actual value of which is 1,925,661.66 

l b I The Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the ac- 
tual value of which is 976,968.20 

The condition of said Real Estate is that 
it belongs to said Corporation, and part of 
it is productive. 

7 — Interest on Loans and Bonds — Uncollected 

and accrued 235,690.52 

TOTAL ASSETS $58,478,423.28 

LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said Corporation ones Deposits amounting to 

and the actual value of which is $54,794,908.38 

{Number of Depositors. 85,402; 
Average Amount of Deposits, $640.94.) 
2 — Contingent Funds — Accrued In- 
terest on Loans and Bonds. ..$ 235,690.52 

3— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,447,824.38 

3,683,514.90 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $58,478,423.28 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By CHARLES MAYO, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By E. J. TOBIN, Acting Secretary. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 

Cityand County of San Francisco — ss. 

CHARLES MAYO and E. J. TOBIN, being each dulv sworn, 
each for himself, says: That said CHARLES MAYO is Presi- 
dent and that said E. J. TOBIN is Acting Secretary of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the corpora- 
tion above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 
CHARLES MAYO, President. 
E. J. TOBIN, Acting Secretarv. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of July, 1913. 
CHAS. T. STANLEY, 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California. 




RiUWlihid July 20. taS4 





Devoted to the Leading Intereate of California and the Pacific Coaat. 




Vol. LXXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 12, 1913 



No. 2 



They have no signs at the Beach reading "Standing 

Room Only," though there's no reason why they shouldn't. 

We vote a three days' Fourth as sane enough for any- 
body, even though we didn't have much to do with arranging it. 

This has been called an off year, but it doesn't seem 

that President Wilson could be persuaded to accept it as such. 

When Colonel Bryan is too busy to make speeches, it 

speaks well for the influence of the gentleman in the White 
House. 

Just now it is beginning to look as though even the word 

of a convicted bunkoman is to be accepted as strictly be- 
lievable. 

Despite discouraging occurrences, there is evidence that 

not a few candidates will contest for the presidency in Mexico 
next October. 

Not particularly gentle finishing touches those being 

made on the Panama Canal in removing 3,000,000 cubic yards 
of earth a month. 

Certain employees in San Francisco consider this year's 

Fourth was about as sane as it could be because it extended 
over the fifth. 

After all, William Howard Taft seems perfectly satisfied 

that his friend Woodrow has all the worry these days, and 
who can blame him? 

Now that we really can have the Liberty Bell, why not 

make some alterations at the State Capital, so that it can feel 
a little more at home here. 

California does not wish to be disrespectful or lacking in 

appreciation of the great dignity of a President, but she's giv- 
ing Woodrow a lot of worry. 

And now they are going to attempt the scaling of the 

Himalayas. Dr. Cook might doubtless furnish some good ad- 
vice about how to do it easiest. 

With so much cold water from the St. Lawrence River 

so close to hand, it is rather strange that we should hear a 
cry for pure water from Chicago. 

Congress would possibly even be pleased to sit around 

drinking iced grape juice in preference to sitting in the House 
listening to Presidential messages. 

Despite the fact that the Governor of Ohio wants to 

make voting compulsory we are still waiting to have some one 
show us that it really can tie done. 

In the light of Congressman Mann's references to the 

President in the Diggs-Caminetti affair, we would be more in- 
clined to believe he was that which his name stands for were 
he to act more like one. 



Thomas Nelson Page says he'll do no literary work 

while an ambassador. It's a pity we cannot shut some less 
worthy writers off that way. 

Some of these beautiful laws in California which the '13 

legislature enacted are good specimens of the tyranny of 
minorities who make a noise like a majority. 

It is bad enough when two Irishmen fall out, but when 

two "Mac's" come to blows there is some jar. And MacNab 
hasn't lost any of his Scotch ability to be vera bitter. 

Judging by the marches and countermarches of Mexican 

rebel and federal forces, those hot-heads down there are bent 
on getting all the wear they can out of their feet. 

According to statistics anent the consumption of liquor 

it seems that lovers of beer in dry towns haven't lost their con- 
ception of the value of a case of the amber fluid. 

Some one had the ingeniousness the other day to esti- 
mate the population of Mexico, despite the disturbances which 
have been cutting it down for the past few years. 

One beautiful thing votes for women makes possible is 

the opportunity of generalizing about their age without being 
forced to be really evasive or forget any birthdays. 

They say that tramps are flocking to Kansas to observe 

operations in the harvest season. And it is not likely that their 
advent will solve the problem of obtaining sufficient help. 

Did the New Jersey Bar Association know anything 

about the lobby discussion in progress at Washington when it 
decided to maintain a committee at the State capital at the next 
session? 

Between the talk about trouserettes, slit skirts and 

woman police judges, poor man will soon throw up his hands 
and yell: "For Heaven's sake, give them the earth — it's no 
place for me." 

Imagine the enthusiasm which must be that of the mem- 
bers of Congress in the prospect that President Wilson will 
call another extra session before December if they fail to pass 
a currency bill at the present one. 

Now that the expose gown has reached this country, the 

reformers will be furnished with another chance to declaim 
that chances for morality are getting worse despite attempts to 
legislate people into their beliefs. 

Champ Clark says that "hog jowl and mustard greens 

are fit for a king." There are a few hungry individuals in the 
United States who would doubtless consider them even good 
enough for a plain, ordinary citizen. 

In one county in Georgia there are' sixty girls in a can- 

ib. Rumor has it that they're forming a State-wide one 
here for one Hiram Johnson, in spite of Chester Rowell's ef- 
forts to put him in the world leadership class. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 




Why should the San Francisco Ex- 
Why Mislead aminer attempt to mislead the tax- 
The People? payers of this city? Why should 
that newspaper gild over an unbusi- 
nesslike and unprofitable proposition with misstatement of 
facts and an utterly childish and crude attack upon the probity 
of the United Railroads? 

What has the probity of the United Railroads got to do with 
the proposition now before the people? Ths merit or demerit 
of that company is a question whicn the people can decide for 
themselves. In fact, the unfriendliness of the Examiner can 
general 1 . y be considered as an argument in favor of the person 
or persons who are subject to its attack. 

The one and only question now up to. the people — the tax- 
payers — of San Francisco is : Will it pay the taxpayers of this 
city to authorize the borrowing of $3,437,000 by the munici- 
pality for the purpose of making extensions in its street rail- 
way system? 

The Examiner says it will — the Supervisors and the Mayor 
say it will. Yet none of them have advanced one sound argu- 
ment to prove the assertion. 

The News Letter makes the unqualified assertion that the 
proposal upon which the people are invited to pass judgment 
on August 26th means nothing more nor less than the building 
of an unreasonable, gigantic and unbearable municipal debt. 

And every individual taxpayer in the city of San Francisco 
must bear his or her share of that responsibility. Why mislead 
the people? Why not face the facts squarely and leave the 
mere sentimental question of municipal ownership aside for 
a moment? 

To-day there are $12,000,000 in bonds of the city of San 
Francisco on the market without any immediate prospect of 
being purchased. Is or is not the taxpayer concerned in such 
a distressing fact? Yet we are asked to vote further bonds to 
drug the market because a few traffickers cannot resist the 
opportunity to play cheap politics. 

The assertion made by those who view this matter in a 
common sense way, that the proposal for which these bonds are 
demanded will not relieve the congestion in 1915 has never 
been denied. The Examiner evades it — the city officials fight 
shy of it. 

According to the City Engineer's statement, the extensions 
which the city will build, if the bond election in August carries, 
cannot possibly be completed in less than twenty months from 
the date of the bonds, December 1st this year. To say nothing 
of unforeseen delays, the lines cannot be completed until the 
1915 Exposition's about to close. 

Consider the burden citizens are asked to bear and what it 
will give to them in return. If the borrowing is authorized, 
every taxpayer assumes his or her share of a $175,000 yearly 
indebtedness to pay annual interest on the bonds. After five 
years of this have passed, an additional $100,000 annual pay- 
ment must be assumed, which totals the burden to $275,000 
per year. 

And what do we get in return? Street railroads paralleling 
existing lines; no assurance that the new lines will be built by 
even the close of 1915; no solution of the aggravating problem 
of Exposition transportation, and an enormous increase in the 
number of city employees who will naturally be supporters of 
the present civic administration. 

The voting of $3,437,000 in bonds guarantees nothing save 



an addition to the already monstrous burden which the people 
have to bear and the privilege of watching a gang of traffickers 
in municipal politics reaping profit by reason of the city's fool- 
ishness. 

Is the return worth the price we are asked to pay? The News 
Letter, in defense of the interests of the taxpayers, declares 
that it is not and cannot be. And it should take something 
more than the crude and mendacious quibblings of the San 
Francisco Examiner to convince the citizens of San Francisco 
that they should assist in breaking their own backs by becoming 
the victims of flagrant attempts to mislead them on the part of 
those who should guard their every interest. 

Work against the bonds — ifs your only salvation. 
5er 

True to its policy of doing all it 
The Public Assured. can toward discrediting the admin- 
istration and President Wilson in 
particular, the San Francisco Examiner vaguely hints that 
Washington officialdom is much worried because of a flood of 
protests over the appointment of the prosecutors who are to 
take the places of McNab and Herrington in the Diggs-Cami- 
netti affair. 

The attempt on the part of the Examiner is in line with a 
policy which began in a spirit of puerile revenge and has gradu- 
ally been nursed into something which scarcely merits the 
dignity of contempt. The pity is that that which might be 
made to do a noble public service is so debasingly prostituted 
to gratify the spleen of a very small-minded man with a 
warped conception of political and journalistic decency. 

No Californian who knows Thomas E. Hayden or Matt Sulli- 
van is in need of any expression of opinion from William Ran- 
dolph Hearst as to their integrity or their acceptability as 
prosecutors who will be unrelenting in the prosecution which 
is before them. 

Caminetti and Diggs are known to be guilty, and prosecutors 
Hayden and Sullivan know what the laws of the United States 
are in respect to the crimes those two young men have com- 
mitted. Confident that President Wilson desires at all times 
to see justice done and guilt punished, and that he appointed 
men whom he had reason to believe would carry out those pur- 
poses, the News Letter does not hesitate in asserting that the 
men substituted for McNab and Herrington will do their duty 
and in a manner satisfactory to all justice-loving people in the 
United States. 

The number of people who know the two new prosecutors in 
the district of Northern California are numerous, and we be- 
lieve that they know them equally as well as does William 
Hearst. If the latter could for a moment forget that he has 
determined to discredit the administration at any cost and at all 
times, perhaps he might be man enough to acknowledge that the 
prosecution in both of the cases (which have given rise to such 
deplorable discussion) is pre-eminently safe in the hands of 
Hayden and Sullivan. At all events, we believe that we are 
justified in asserting that the public feels assured, and that, 
after all, is most important. 

7B- 

How many of the 1,600,000 women who received the 

ballot in Illinois really cared whether they got the thing or 
not? They do not seem to over relish the privilege here in 
California, although you would think by the talk that every 
one of them were model voters. 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



As a result of a meeting recently 
California Unification, held in San Diego, at which repre- 
sentatives of the Temples of the 
Mystic Shrine of Oakland, San Diego, Los Angeles and San 
Francisco were in attendance, a great movement has been 
started which has as its motto: "All for one and one for all." 
The plans and details of the organization have been completed 
and will be extended to include every city, town and village in 
California, to the end that every section of the State will 
boost the other in season and out of season. 

The four temples unifying in this organization intend that 
all former lines of imaginary division of interests will be wiped 
out, and California shall present an undivided house. The 
first activity will be the sending of a patrol and band through- 
out the State on a special train to spread this gospel. 

This tour will be preliminary to a tour to be taken next year 
to Atlanta, Georgia, to the meeting of the Imperial Council of 
the Mystic Shrine, a tour which will take in every large city 
in the United States for the express purpose of advertising 
California in every way which will create a wide-spread desire 
to come here and enjoy with us the splendid things which are 
ours. 

The object outlined in the general purpose of the organiza- 
tion is one which should receive the commendation of all Cali- 
fornians. There should be every effort made on the part of 
the citizens to aid in the great mission of unification which the 
Masons have taken upon themselves as their great task. 

SB" 
The reports recently issued by the 
Not Very Encouraging. Federal government regarding the 
consumption of whisky and beer 
during the fiscal year 1913, in the United States, cannot be said 
to be particularly favorable as an argument in favor of local 
option, prohibition or any proposal advanced by advocates of 
temperance for the curtailment of the liquor traffic. 

According to the statistics prepared by the department of 
internal revenue, the consumption of liquors during the fiscal 
year 1913 was far greater than that of any previous year in the 
history of the country. Despite this fact, statistics show that 
the number of saloons in the country decreased by 18,000 during 
the year. 

Has the prohibition party or any anti-saloon league any 
sound explanation for such a condition of affairs? Not very 
long ago, the anti-saloon workers of this State met in San 
Francisco and passed determined resolutions on the question 
of rendering this State a desert as far as saloons are concerned. 
We would not like to accuse anti-saloon workers of insin- 
cerity, but facts seem to point to what might be interpreted as 
a grave evidence of collusion between manufacturers and those 
who talk temperance. Why? Simply because, instead of re- 
ducing consumption, the decrease in the number of saloons in- 
creases it. Without intending to insinuate anything ulterior in 
the motives behind those men and women fighting the liquor 
traffic, we would suggest that they lose no time in making a 
change in their tactics. 

The News Letter does not believe, and facts seem but to 
make mistrust more certain and absolute, that the policy and 
efforts of antisaloon leagues is or can ever be of any good 
to the people of the country. It is like too many reforms — it 
is an attempt at public uplift which leaves human nature out 
■ of the question, and sets aside reason for the sake of senti- 
mental rot. 

Moral suasion, and that alone? will ever accomplish the re- 
duction of the consumption of liquor and the consumption will 
never be removed until the manufacture is prohibited abso- 
lutely, and the law is enforced to the letter. 



Ambassador Page. 



According to some people, Walter 
H. Page, Ambassador of the United 
States to Great Britain, has com- 
mitted a grave indiscretion. He has dared to state before a 
British audience, composed of men of high intelligence and 
conversant with world topics, that there was a time when the 
government of the United States used to "give special privi- 
leges to special classes." 

Ambassador Page has been so unpatriotic and so lacking in 
the true spirit of jingoistic loyalty as to dare to state what is 
the common knowledge of every person who has paid any at- 
tention to the government of the United States during the past 
fifteen or twenty years. 

Whether or not it was the intention to create and recognize 
a special and privileged class in this country, the enactment 
of the Dingley Tariff Law marked the beginning of what has 
become one of the greatest burdens the great mass of the 
American people have been compelled to bear. Only one class 
has derived benefit from the provisions of that law, and that 
class is to-day using every effort to obstruct the pending tariff 
reductions at the nation's capital. 

President Wilson and his administration are engaged in 
what will eventually mean the placing of our industries upon 
the basis of competitive efficiency. Why should not the Am- 
bassador of this country, representing, as he does, the whole 
.people of the United States, confess that our government has 
at last realized that, in granting high protection to our indus- 
tries, we have been thereby fostering a special class at the ex- 
pense of the whole people? 

He who realizes his shortcomings and makes every effort to 
rectify them, is more to be admired than he who, knowing of 
their existence, persists in them and attempts to cover them 
up with pretentious platitudes. 

That the President of the United States, at a time when com- 
binations of interests are at the height of their power as re- 
gards the ability to demand tribute of the people they do not 
give "value received," is man enough to assert that the govern- 
ment and its laws and enactments must be of the people and for 
the people, is something of which Americans should be proud. 
If President Wilson and Ambassador Page are demagogues, 
then a demagogue is the only man whom we can rely upon to 
place the United States on a plane among the nations of the 
world which will reflect to our credit and make for untold and 
nation-wide material advancement. 

We do not censure Ambassador Page — we rather commend 
him. That we have been great enough to acknowledge our 
past errors and weaknesses makes our correction of those 
evils the more admirable. And it is unlikely that those in Eng- 
land who heard or read of the statement of our Ambassador 
will think the less of the country he represents, or of him, 
because of his admissions. 

Opponents of tariff reductions are still drumming about 

the cost of living not going down as fast as tariff changes are 
being proposed. Can't they even give the thing a chance. It 
will take the manufacturers a little while to come, to their 
senses. 

Illinois is alarmed because of the fear that the women's 

vote will take the men's drinks away from them. Why should 
they worry — perhaps the women want them is bad as the men, 
if we believe some of the stories we hear. 

3ST 

Travel across the Pacific has increased 40 per cent dur- 
ing the first three months of the present year— and the Panama 
Canal isn't opened yet. 



San Francisco News Letter 



FAILURE OR MISFIT? 



July 12, 1913. 



A PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER ASKS THE PEOPLE THE QUESTION REGARDING 
THE JOHNSON ADMINISTRATION-FORM YOUR ANSWER FROM THE FACTS. 



FAILURE. 

The News Letter has consistently held that the Constitution 
of the State of California is obsolete and wholly inadequate as 
a means of reaching the goal of true democracy which we are 
supposed to be attempting to reach. 

In a recent editorial calculated to be more or less of a de- 
fense of the administration of Governor Johnson in answer to 
the criticism which is being meted out to him by those who are 
not duty bound or otherwise compelled to knuckle to him, the 
Fresno Republican makes the lament that our Constitution is 
complex and outworn. 

The Republican, while admitting that the Constitution is in- 
efficient and cumbersome, fails to admit that the Progressives, 
who assured the people that they were going to limber up the 
machinery of government so that justice for all of the people 
would be more certain, have utterly failed to do so. They 
have added to the regulations and restrictions to such an extent 
that anything which has a semblance of business enterprise 
has been condemned as not in the best interests of progress. 

Our sympathy is entirely with the Republican in its rather 
gigantic task of endeavoring to stem the tide of popular dis- 
approval of the bluffs made by the soldiers of Armageddon in 
the name of progress. We are condemned by our Fresno 
friend because we have alluded to certain measures as being 
evidence of the utter unfitness of the Johnson administration 
for the reason that all newspapers which have opposed the 
party in power have likewise based their opposition upon the 
self-same measures. 

And we maintain that our contention that the Compensation 
Bill is a direct encouragement of malingering and dis- 
couragement of business enterprise, is supported by the best 
of facts because just such a bill has proven to be what we 
assert that it is, both in England and in Germany. We main- 
tain that no administration has the right to establish commis- 
sions composed of men beyond control and with unlimited 
powers, for the purpose of regulating the activities of the peo- 
ple in any direction, and for the sole object of fortifying itself 
with the means of building up a political machine. 

The Fresno Republican may accuse the News Letter of tak- 
ing to the defensive, to its heart's content. We admit the 
charge and glory in the fact. We are on the defensive in the 
interest of the people whom we do not believe should be hood- 
winked by any political party no matter how divine may have 
been its inception, whether on the field of Armageddon or in 
the office of Boss Lissner of Los Angeles. 

The reiterated assertion that the Constitution of this State is 
such as to render it difficult for the people to obtain proper 
effect in the use of the initiative and referendum has made 
itself felt. There is no doubt but that the people will seek the 
formation of a newer and better one. And there is every reason 
to believe that it will not be left to the Progressive party as 
we have come to know it here in California, to do the framing. 

Can there be any doubt about the failure of a party which 
refuses to overlook the results of the Red Light Law in the 
State of its birth, Iowa, and tells the people of California that 
they must put up with laws which will prove detrimental to 
every property-holder in the State, and which will spread the 
loathesomeness of the red light evil into the heart of every 
community ? 



MISFIT. 

The News Letter has maintained that the Progressive party, 
under the leadership of Hiram W. Johnson and the Lissner- 
Earl interests has so conducted itself during its tenure of office 
as to cause the people to wonder whether it is a freak propo- 
sition or simply a collection of misguided fakes. 

Chester Rowell, who is working "overtime" in the defense 
of the party which will possibly reward him with the ques- 
tionable prize of the nomination as the next Progressive Sena- 
torial candidate, has at times become intensely dramatic in 
his declaration that the late legislature at Sacramento won for 
itself the praise of the world because it was great and broad 
and noble enough to come to the assistance of the weak, and 
solve problems which man has heretofore shunned and not 
dared to touch or change. 

According to the Republican of Fresno, the Progressive party 
will live in history by reason of the fact that it dared to assert 
that the women of this State would no longer be led into im- 
morality because of insufficient remuneration for daily labor. 
The Johnson administration has enacted a minimum wage for 
women, and raised them in this State forever above the reach 
of that half-world which we speak of in whispers. 

Consider the report which was recently handed to the city of 
New York, framed by several leading social workers who for- 
merly believed that low wages was the cause of immorality 
among women. The conclusion of the investigators' report is 
as follows : 

"Our observation and experience indicate that the most im- 
portant contributing causes of immorality among girls are: 
Weakness of mind and will, individual temperament, immoral 
associates, lack of religious or ethical training, injurious home 
influences, cramped living accommodations rendering privacy 
difficult, lack of industrial efficiency, idleness, unwillingness to 
accept available employment, love of finery and pleasure, un- 
wholesome amusement, inexperience and ignorance of social 
temptations. We therefore hold that it has not been satisfac- 
torily demonstrated that low wages are a direct cause of loss of 
virtue of working girls." 

Among the signers of the report were Sophie C. Barclay, 
superintendent of the Margaret J. Bennett Home at Baltimore; 
Kate Waller Barrett, president of the National Florence Crit- 
tenden Mission at Alexandria, Va.; Dr. R. W. Corwin of 
Pueblo, Col., chairman of Special Association Committee on 
Public School Health Problems from the American Medical 
Association; Thomas Estill, commissioner of the Salvation 
Army at Chicago; George J. Kneeland, director of investiga- 
tion of the Vice Commission at Chicago. 

Yet the Johnson administration has legalized malingering 
among the laboring men of the State by virtue of the Work- 
men's Compensation Law, and thus paved the way for even 
"more injurious home influences" than ever. 

Despite the facts as laid down in the portion of the report 
here furnished, the Progressive party in this State talks of bet- 
tering morals and social conditions by virtue of laws which 
tend to cripple anything and everything which makes for social 
conditions which will best build a truly progressive, liberty 
enjoying, enterprising community. 

Can there be any doubt as to whether the Johnson adminis- 
tration is a misfit and a failure? 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 




MM 



TOWN CRIER 



District Attorney Fickert has locked horns with William 

Mundell, manager for the Pacific Coast of the Burns Detective 
Agency, and the corridors of the Hall of Justice echo with the 
roar of conflict. Fickert charges Mundell with trying to make 
Rovigo and some of the Italian bunco men suborn perjury for 
the purpose of involving himself and members of his office. 
Mundell, on the other hand, says all sorts of impolite things 
about the District Attorney, and charges that he protected the 
white slave interests and that he tried to bury the facts in the 
bunco scandals instead of bringing them to light. Of course, 
both of these gentlemen are perfectly honorable men, and we 
are in duty bound to accept their words as the truth, and nothing 
but the truth, as they say in the courts; so why not give each 
of them the benefit of the doubt, when they are telling the se- 
crets of the inner workings, of their respective offices. In the 
meantime, so as to keep the public peace, it would be a good 
thing to call out the State Militia, and allot one company to 
each of the fiery men of the law, so that nothing untoward 
could happen to them or to the public. One cannot be too 
careful when such valiant fighters, armed with Blackstone and 
brief, attack each other on the streets or in public places. 

Out here in sunny California our women folks know 



their rights so well that appropriating for their own use little 
things like men's bathing apparel at our popular beaches does 
not in the least perturb them. Late male bathers arriving at 
one of Alameda's beach resorts recently found to their dis- 
may that their fair sisters and wives had stolen a march on 
them, and secured all the men's bathing- suits for their own 
dear selves. Now it might be very charming, and it is, to see 
our women folk disport themselves in the waters of the bay in 
only the abbreviated garments that fashion has set for men's 
wear, but how about those poor fellows who bad to battle with 
the waves, enveloped in bathing skirts that the women refused 
to wear, as long as the men's suits held out. Is this not 
stretching the theory of women's rights almost to the point 
where it merges into that of men's wrongs? 

Captain Templin M. Potts, U. S. Navy, the senior offi- 
cer "plucked" by this year's "plucking board," as one unde- 
sirable for promotion, and therefore to be compulsorily retired, 
had his name changed by law for a peculiar and perhaps un- 
precedented reason. He was christened Morris Templin Potts, 
and the name pleased him and his friends until he entered the 
Naval Academy, when, following the custom prevailing there 
of designating men by initials rather than by spelled out first 
names, he became known as M. T. Potts. The arrangement 
of the initials irked him. He did not like this plan at all, but 
could not help it, so he managed to find a court and a judge 
that authorized him legally to transpose his first two names, 
and to become Templin Morris, or T. M. Potts, instead of 
Morris Templin, or M. T. Potts. 

No more can William Jennings tell that little story 

about his daughter running for a street car and making it, sim- 
ply to demonstrate that at least one member of the family could 
run for something and get it. He attained the Presidency, if 
only for one great and glorious day. and he didn't have to ask 
the people's permission to do it, either. Furthermore, the at- 
tainment afforded Willie Hearst an opportunity which he would 
not have lost for all his millions. Truly fate and other things 
does play into the hand? of the Prince of the Yellows. 



San Francisco's first women jury— that is, the first to sit 

in the Superior Court — has made an enviable record. When 
court was convened the first day of the trial of Mrs. Bertha J. 
Williams on an extortion charge, the juresses, every one of 
them, were seated in the jury-box — excuse us, we should be 
unfair in saying that they were all there, for the truth must 
be told, one of the fair nTembers was not there. True, she did 
arrive later on, a little flustered and anxious as to what the 
iaw would do with her for keeping the court waiting. The law, 
however, is not so bad after all, and when the fair juress ex- 
plained that she had just purchased a new hat, and, of course, 
it was a perfect dear, and she just had to try it on, of course 
the judge did not care even if she was a little late. Well, the 
jury, the real woman's jury, at last settled down to work, hats 
were forgotten and hobbles were relegated to the back seat, 
at least for the time being. Of course, it was some mean man 
who said that he heard two of the juresses discussing the gowns 
of the women in the court room, which base slander we do not 
credit, because a lady juror is a juror for all of that, and would 
not be guilty of taking the court's time in discussing such 
frivolous things as hats and other feminine articles of apparel. 

San Francisco is a sport-loving town, and its citizens, 

not satisfied with going to regular bouts in ringed arenas, some- 
times indulge in impromptu fistic affairs, as chance directs. 
The calm of an otherwise peaceful Sunday was ruffled this 
week by an encounter between two belligerent citizens of one 
of the Latin-American republics, who punched and pummeled 
their difficulties up Market street from Montgomery to Kearny, 
for fully a half hour at high noon. This being a very quiet 
and unfrequented corner, it was hardly to be expected that 
any representative of the law should be around, but such was 
not the case: a policeman was there; he arrived shortly after 
the fight was over. Yes, he came walking around the corner 
just as cool as a cucumber, and cleared the street in fine style. 

In this commercial age, nothing is sacred from the spirit 

of speculation, as is proven by the recent "exhibition" at one 
of the Southern California beaches, when an enterprising 
manager had a couple married on a stage in front of an audi- 
ence of some odd thousands, as one of the features of the day's 
program. The fact that the bride fainted several times, there- 
by cutting the ceremony short, should not be held against her 
— the novelty of the situation probably unnerved her; then, 
again, she most likely had never been married a la Orpheum 
Circuit style before. The question comes up, however, whether 
the audience has the right of demanding their price of admis- 
sion back. 

Chicago has appointed ten lady — I beg your pardon: I 

should say women — -police to watch for the rude male mashers 
of the Windy City. The "copettes" will be stationed about the 
various beaches, and woe be to the man who looks cross-eyed 
at them, or at any of the fair sirens who tempt the waves, and 
incidentally the braves, at the summer resorts. San Francisco 
should follow this example and station a few "copettes" around 
town, as the new style of feminine apparel is having a de- 
moralizing effect upon the gallant men of this city, and who 
knows but some perfectly respectable citizen may inadver- 
tently wink the other eye when he shouldn't. 

We are becoming an effeminate race of molly-coddles. 

Just imagine a Fourth of July with only a few forty odd deaths 
and some odd hundred accidents passing into history as our 
tribute to the Goddess of Liberty? What are we coming to, 
when we can actually sit back and let such an opportunity to 
turn our land into a gory battlefield pass by without turning a 
Will the noiseless "Fourth" bring on "fightless war," 
like the Paris dressmakers are bringing out the skirtless dress ? 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



r 



:[ 



1 



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or 

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HAYNES AUTO SALES CO., (Inc.) 



L 



(Factory Branch) 

San Francisco: Turk at Polk Street 

Oakland Sacramento Fresno Loa Angeles f- 



][== 



DQC 



Jl 




Britannic Futures. 

Considerable concern is being expressed in England as to 
the future policy which shall dominate the conduct of the 
British Empire both in regard to the Colonies and to foreign 
connections. The predominate idea is apparently that England 
should lose no time in cementing a closer social and national 
alliance with the United States. This latter seems to be grow- 
ing into more of a necessity every day, despite the threatened 
break between the two countries. 

The recent action of the Canadian Senate in vetoing the bill 
providing for the donation of a large sum of money to the par- 
ent government as a contribution to imperial defense has caused 
the ultra imperialistic proponents no little alarm, as they fear 
that it foretells the defeat of the idea of a central Imperial 
Council at the Empire's Capital for the control of Empire af- 
fairs and the consequent Empire consolidation. 

Although there is no party particularly anti-imperialistic, 
it seems that there is some little difference of opinion as to the 
ultimate policy which will govern the Britannia of the future. 
It is of course unthinkable that the Colonies would entertain 
any policy which would take away from them any of their 
present privileges of self-government, but it is everywhere 
realized that there must be some plan of coalition which will 
insure the combination which will forever act as a preventative 
of dissolution of the Empire. 

An "Invincible Alliance" is perhaps the most favored of all 
plans thus far. Such a plan would mean that the United 
States would come into the golden ring in some way, thus mak- 
ing for a combination which would represent a world Power 
which would be able to withstand all attack and dictate the 
policies of the world at large. 

Richard Jebb, a noted English writer, has lately published 
a book on the question of Britain's future status in which this 
latter idea is set forth. He warns the British Empire against 
the danger of the colonies and the home government dwelling 
too much on the material aspect as affecting themselves rather 
than going in whole-heartedly for solidarity. This danger, 
which many public men recognize gives rise to the wonder 
whether the national faith or faction will predominate. 



Arming to Keep Peace. 

Despite the arguments of peace promoters and their efforts 
to convince nations that disarmament is the only sure means of 
gaining that Utopian achievement known as universal peace, 
the great Powers keep on in the race for military and naval 
supremacy. 

The Three Year's Service Bill in France, which has caused 
so much excitement and no little public clamor and protest, was 
ably defended by the French premier in a recent speech in 
Paris; in which he brought forth considerable enthusiasm from 
even those opposed to him. Speaking of the efforts of France 
with regard to the development of military strength, he pledged 
his word that Russia, France's ally, was making a parallel 
effort in order that the French and the Russian armies might be 
prepared for all eventualities. 

This announcement was received with great enthusiasm 
throughout France. The Minister of War, in an intensely 
patriotic speech, declared that the demands of the government 
of France were for the preservation of the security of the 
frontiers and the dignity of the country so that the republic 
might retain her position in Europe. 

It is thought that the speeches of the two leading Frenchmen 
have done much to allay the disruption which has been threat- 
ening the country as a result of the determined opposition to the 
Three Years' Service Bill, and to have done much to restore 
the government in the confidence of the nation. 



The Marconi Affair and the Government. 
Interest has not quieted in England with reference to the 
troubles in the British House of Commons over the Marconi 
scandals which involved two members of the Cabinet despite 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



the fact that the investigation into the charges whitewashed 
the accused Ministers. 

Lord Charles Beresford, who is widely known for his out- 
spokenness, lately administered some strong advice to the gov- 
ernment in this connection. Referring to the Marconi affair, he 
scoffed at the assertion of the government that it was all an 
error in judgment. He demanded that the ministers concerned 
in the scandals present their resignations to the House of 
Commons. 

"Nothing has stirred up attention," said Lord Beresford, "so 
much as attempts at concealment. 

"We must all feel humiliated, because the cleanliness of our 
public life has been affected. We have lost the proud position 
we have held throughout the whole world as Britons. The best 
thing, therefore, that the Government can do is to pack up their 
traps and get out to any other part of the world. 

"But I believe we have only had one-half cf the scandal. The 
court to deal with the question should bave been a court of 
judges, and not a packed party committee, which avoided every- 
thing they could avoid, and made a report which could only 
be called a whitewashing of the principal offenders. 

"If we condone such acts as these we shall do an irreparable 
injury to the public life of this country." 



Something Done. 

The British government, satisfied that the worst faults of the 
Congo administration have been ended, has officially recog- 
nized the annexation of the Congo by Belgium. Great Britain 
has also made satisfactory arrangements with Germany respect- 
ing the construction by Germany of the Bagdad Railway. But 
the Germans have undertaken not to carry the line beyond 
Bushrah without British consent. Their great interests in the 
Persian Gulf are therefore safeguarded, and they have the right 
to navigate up.to Bagdad. 



OBITUARY. 



The death of Rudolph B. Spence, a large landholder of Mon- 
terey, on Sunday evening last after a prolonged illness, in the 
Marleborough Apartments, this city, marks the passing of an- 
other California pioneer into the Great Beyond. Mr. Spence 
was in his fifty-seventh year, a descendant of one of the most 
distinguished of California Spanish families, and leaves a 
widow, Mary S., and a daughter, Inez, who is a student at 
Notre Dame Academy, San Jose. 

Mr. Spence was a great-great-grandson of Governor Ar- 
guello, next to the last of the Spanish Governors of this State, 
whose son was the second Governor under the Mexican regime. 
One of the daughters of the latter was Conchita, whose love 
affair, with its tragic ending with the Russian soldier, Rezanov, 
was immortalized in one of Bret Harte's famous poems. This 
episode is also the subject of one of Gertrude Atherton's best, 
novels. 



On Sunday afternoon last, one of San Francisco's most 
popular and promising young financial men, George Lingard 
Payne, Jr., was drowned in the Russian River, above Clover- 
dale, and in the sight of dozens of other swimmers who were 
powerless to aid him. 

Payne was the son of George. Lingard Payne, President of 
the Payne Bolt Works, and a 'director in several large and 
prosperous manufacturing and financial concerns. He had 
gone to the resort on Saturday last to Sunday with his two 
brothers, Alvin and Will, his mother and sister, and a party of 
friends. The death was due to heart failure caused by going 
into the water after having a hearty meal. The body was 
quickly lecovcred from the water, but all attempts to revive 
the young man were unsuccessful. The mother is prostrated 
as a result of the accident. 



Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa. 
urlce. 



e from Pan Fr»nri*>.> First claw 



Miss M. Hayes 



Miss B. B. Brown 



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San Francisco club man In commenting upon the 
distinctively pleasing taste and exceptional 
quality of 



WlELANdS 

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the favored brew of San Francisco's leading 
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Phone Douglas 671 

SAN FRANCISCO 




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San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



CASA DEL REY NOTES. 

Mr. G. TL McFarland, vice-president of the Bell Telephone 
Company, is stopping at Casa del Rey for the season. Mr. 
McFarland came to Santa Cruz about a month ago, and was so 
impressed with the delightful climate and fine hotel accommo- 
dations that he decided to come back and have his family stay 
here during the summer months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip T. Prather, of San Francisco, are stay- 
ing at Casa del Rey. Mr. Prather is at the head of the San 
Francisco branch of the Cadillac Automobile Company. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Prather are well known in Santa Cruz, having 
stopped at thf, Casa del Rey for the past three seasons. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Gartenlaub, of San Francisco, motored down 
from San Francisco to spend the Fourth at Santa Cruz. They 
are staying at Casa del Rey. Mr. Gartenlaub is a prominent 
raisin grower, and is at the head of the Raisin Growers' Asso- 
ciation of Fresno. 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Lange, of San Francisco, motored 
down from town and are at Casa del Rey. 

Some of the auto parties that motored down from San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland to spend the holidays at Casa del Rey in- 
cluded: H. W. Force, of Oakland, and party; D. O. Lively, of 
■San Francisco, and party; Mr. R. A. Pony and family, of San 
.Francisco; Mr. John W. Schlosser and family, of San Rafael; 
Mrs. William Cluff and Miss J. Bader, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
■Ghixardelli and Dr. H. P. Travers, of Oakland; Mr. Robert A. 
Roos and party from San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Bro- 
beck and Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Titus, of San Francisco; Mr. and 
Mrs. E. E. Kentfield, Miss Ethel Kentfield, Mrs. Florence K. 
"Little and Mr. H. E. Kentfield, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Buck, Mr. 
.and Mrs. J. A. Buck, Jr., and Miss Viola Buck, Mr. B. E. Nixon 
and J. R. Statter, of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Millar 
and Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Mitchell; Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Chanslor 
and party, of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Heyer, 
of Haywards ; Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Wellbrand and party, of San 
Francisco; Mr. Howard N. Martin and party of golfers, from 
San Francisco. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE NOTES. 

■ Never in the history of the famous Del Monte have they en- 
tertained more people during one week than during the days 
from June 30th to July 6th, inclusive, and never has there been 
more beautiful weather, every day being bright and sunny. 

The scenes on the golf links, women in their attractive golf 
costumes, and men in their white flannels, the hundreds of 
beautifully decorated automobiles and electrics dotting the 
grounds, and the brilliant display of fireworks on the evening 
of July 4th, have made one continuous holiday. The golf tour- 
nament was a decided success, the cups being given out on 
Saturday evening by Mr. Percy Selby, in his inimitable manner. 
The crowd looked forward to the distribution of the golf cups, 
and Mr. Selby's interesting remarks with as much pleasure as 
"they did to the winning of same. 

Among the many people congregated at Del Monte during the 
past week were the following : Bruce Heathcote, of San Fran- 
cisco; Mr. C. S. Stanton, of the S. F. Examiner; Miss Anita L. 
Murray, who is the guest of Mrs. H. C. Quimby; Mrs. G. R. 
Brainerd and Mrs. John M. Palmer, of Springfield, 111.; Mrs. 
Tileanor Martin and J. Downey Harvey, of San Francisco; Mr. 
and Mrs. J. "W. Wright, Miss Augusta Foute, Helen C. Wright, 
A. Harvey Wright, W. Edgerton Wright and Mr. Percy W. 
Selby, of Burlingame; Mr. Frank A. Kales, of Oakland; Cha- 
pin W. Tubbs, of San Francisco; Capt. and Mrs. Wm. Matson, 
Miss Lurline Matson, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. H. McBride and Mr. 
H. Lux and bride, of San Jose; Mrs. Genevieve Parkhurst 
(Lady Teazle), of San Francisco; Dr. N. Hirtz, Victor G. 
Kleinberger and F. H. Edwards, of Los Angeles ; Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander Rutherford, of Playto, Cal.; Mrs. W. C. Graves and 
Mrs. J. F. Jackson, of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Toby 
and Miss G. Lynch, of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. John R. 
Chace, Mr. J. D. Chace and Miss D. Davy, of San Jose, Dr. 
and Mrs. C. M. Cooper, Miss Alice Owen, Mr. Arthur Goodall, 
Mr. and Mrs. Mel. Sweitzer, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. B. Mills and 
Miss Mills, Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Boardman, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
S. Fee, Miss Fee and Miss Elizabeth Fee, of San Francisco; 
Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Towne, of Oakland; Mr. and Mrs. S. W. 
Coleman, of San Mateo; Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Lardner, of 
Berkeley; and Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Swobe, of San Francisco. 



SOCIAL DOINGS AT CASTLE CRAGS. 

A large and enthusiastic audience has been watching the 
tennis tournament at Castle Crags. The beautiful silver lov- 
ing cup presented by Shreve, Treat and Ecret will make a hand- 
some trophy. The finals will be played the first of the week. 
Mr. J. J. Hewitt, one of Tacoma's millionaires, is registered 
at Castle Crags. Mr. Hewitt's family will join him the last of 
the month. 

The guests at Castle Crags are on qui vive over the ap- 
proaching bowling tournament, which is being arranged by 
the social hostess. 

Mr. Robert Pardow entertained friends at a supper, after 
the masquerade ball, which was given at Castle Crags 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace Orear with their family and several 
friends motored to the McCloud River Monday. 

"Coutara Gorge" situated fourteen miles from Castle Crags 
was the setting for an enjoyable picnic party, which was 
given Saturday by Mrs. Silverman. A dozen guests from the 
Farm participated in the entertainment. A "four-in-hand" 
was used as a mode of conveyance. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Cowles from Medford, Or., are summer- 
ing at Castle Crags. 

Mr. William Doud, a rising young attorney of San Francisco, 
is proving nimself to be one the best "hikers" at Castle Crags. 
Mrs. James Campbell, Miss Campbell and Miss Tittle are 
proving a social acquisition to the colony at Castle Crags. 
These attractive San Francisco women have recently returned 
trom a trip around the world. Mrs. Campbell's only son, who 
is on his way from Australia, will join the family at Castle 
Crags, where they are planning to remain until the first of 
September. 

Mr. and Mrs. McCreary and young son of Byesville, Ohio, 
wil spend a month at Castle Crags. 

Mr. F. J. Cornelius is registered at Castle Crags. 
Mr. L. H. Norris and party started in his six cylinder auto- 
mobile from Castle Crags at five o'clock in the morning, and 
arrived at his home in Piedmont at eleven o'clock that evening. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lucey and Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Bullen, of Oak- 
land, are cosily domiciled in one of the log cabins at Castle 
Crags. 

A large number of friends were at the station at Castle 
Crags to bid Mrs. George Innes "good-bye" when she left 
Sunday evening for her home in San Rafael. Mrs. Innes has 
been a guest for three weeks at this popular mountain resort. 
The first of the week she will motor to Monterey, where she 
will spend the season. 

Mrs. Fletcher, wife of Captain Fletcher, U. S. A., Mrs. Wm. 
Heilborn, of Honolulu, and Mr. Cuyler Lee acted as judges at 
the masquerade ball which was given at Castle Crags on the 
evening of the Fourth of July. Mrs. W. H. Bullen impersonated 
a "Darkey Bride;" the character was so cleverly done that the 
first prize, a handsome jewel box, was awarded her. Mr. Lucey 
went as a dashing cqwboy, and won the man's prize, a silver 
cigarette case. Miss California Andrews went as "Red Riding 
Hood," and captured the second, and Mr. Horace Orear, Jr., 
was a success as a clown, and won a prize. 



TRADE JWT\T H 


^ MARK 


BOORD'S 


LONDON, ENG., GINS 


DRY 


OLD TOM 


TWILIGHT 


Charles Meinecke & Co. 


•«■«!■ Pacific Co.it 314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



July 12. 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




PL/Eki 



.D'S WAN 



"We obey no wand hut Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Kinema.color Pictures at the Columbia. 

To such a state of perfection has the moving pic- 
ture risen that our leading theatre here is showing 
for a few weeks some of the marvels of animated 
photography. The series of pictures now being 
shown cover a variety of subjects, and allows the 
onlooker to enjoy an evening that, aside from the 
entertainment features, is an evening of instruction 
and enlightenment. In particular I would call at- 
tention to the motion pictures shown in color of the 
striking features of the Panama Canal, and the pic- 
tures are accompanied with a very interesting lec- 
ture by a young man who spent six years there as 
an active worker. The wonderful undertaking is 
shown in its most important phases, giving us for 
the first time an authentic and accurate idea of the 
gigantic feat which Colonel Goethals and his thou- 
sands of assistants are bringing to a successful con- 
clusion, after years of work which has cost our 
government millions upon millions of dollars. The 
average man, if he has any spirit and pride in his 
nationality, will readily appreciate the tremendous 
task which his country is accomplishing, and I 
would earnestly advise every one of them to wend 
their way to the Columbia Theatre in order to grasp 
the extent of this vast achievement which has 
focused the eyes of the world on America and the 
intrepid spirit which has made this great thing pos- 
sible. The views shown extend along the entire 
route of the canal, embracing the largest and most 
difficult engineering difficulties which our men were 
obliged to encompass and overcome. We are shown 
in a vivid and realistic manner exactly how the 
work is being done, with a close view of the modern 
machinery used and the conglomeration of the many 
nationalities utilized as the rank and file of the 
working forces employed. It is all splendidly real- 
istic, and prompts us to throw out our chests at the 
conclusion of the views, happy in the thought that 
the world's greatest engineering feat is being 
wrought successfully by American brains and en- 
ergy and money. 

Another group of very interesting pictures shown 

are scenes from the seat of the Balkan war, which L 

are of special interest at the present moment in as 
much as the Balkan Allies are now fighting among 
themselves, and with a ferocity which has brought 
them before the eyes of the world in a compelling 
manner. Here we have an opportunity to see Bulgarian and 
Servian and Greek in actual battlefield environment. The pic- 
tures are absorbingly interesting, and that a large number of 
local Greeks are witnessing the performances is evidenced by 
the spontaneous applause which follows the presentation of 
anything pertaining to the Greek army. An unusual series of 
pictures is also shown of Japanese war maneuvres, the first 
time to my knowledge when the Imperial government of Japan 
has allowed any pictures of the kind to be taken. It shows the 
little brown men in the military atmosphere of which we have 
heard much but seen practically nothing. That they are mod- 
ern in every respect and essential so far as modern military 
preparedness is concerned, cannot be denied after seeing these 
pictures. It is an important contribution to the moving picture 
world. Our own navy is shown at the conclusion of the per- 
formance, in review and practice, allowing us ample vent for 
our patriotism, which has been brought to the sizzling point by 
the views of the Panama Canal pictures. All in all, the evening 
spent at the Columbia these days is a mighty interesting and 
entertaining one, and possesses educational values which can- 
not be overestimated. 





Miss Irene Franklin, who will appear at the Orpheum. 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 
The San Francisco Institute of Art 

Formerly the Mark Hopkins Institute' 
Affiliated with the State University 



Drawing 

Painting 

Decorative 

Designing 




Modeling 

Illustrating 

Teachers' 
Course 



Day, Night and Saturday Classes. Circulars mailed on 
application to the San Francisco Art Institute, San 
Francisco. Cal. 

FALL TERM OPENS AUGUST 4th. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



"Princess Chic" at the Tivoli. 

The Tivoli organization is gradually becoming better ac- 
quainted with itself, and the result is gratifying in the extreme. 
As they say in baseball parlance, "team work" is in evidence, 
and the members of the company are working in accord and 
harmony with each other, and knowing their peculiarities and 
scope of ability. It becomes a real pleasure this week to wit- 
ness "Princess Chic." The people of the company have surely 
had a versatile round of roles to enact since the opening of the 
season, but a few weeks ago, and no further or striking example 
of the cleverness of the individual members of the company is 
needed than to see them this week in a comic opera far re- 
moved from any they have so far done. 

Nowadays it is a common thing for managers who believe 
that they are catering to the public taste to throw a number of 
vaudeville teams together, hire a number of chorus girls and 
build adequate scenery, and by a display of supposed feminine 
charms, which is, to say the least, in bad taste and often bor- 
ders on outrignt obscenity, crowd the theatres with an exhi- 
bition which is salacious and offends good taste. Such condi- 
tions cannot last long, and I predict a return to the good old 
times when we had real comic opera. 

The Tivoli company this week show their mettle, and every 
member contributes to a really fine performance. Henry San- 
trey emphasizes again the splendid impression he has already 
created. As the Duke of Burgundy, his work is more than 
usually good. He looks and acts the part, and his singing leaves 
nothing to be desired. John R. Phillips is better this week, and 
works conscientiously and satisfies. Thomas Leary, an old 
Tivoli favorite, is back again with the company, and as Cham- 
bertin, he is extremely ludicrous and unctuous. Charles Gala- 
gher blossoms forth as a comedian, and in company with Teddy 
Webb, they are the swaggering bandits to the life, who are 
brave only when they attack old men and women. Galagher 
has one solo which is a pleasure to listen to. He is going to 
become very popular. Webb is as good as he always is. Rob- 
ert Pitkin in a comedy role evinces more than ordinary comedy 
traits, and I look forward to him doing some notable work dur- 
ing his connection with the company. Rena Vivienne as "Prin- 
cess Chic" is fine. She throws lots of zest and spirit into her 
part, and she makes her various disguises a means of showing 
her cleverness. Her singing is splendid. Sarah Edwards and 
Hon Bergere also contribute in a noteworthy manner to a per- 
formance which, in point of general satisfaction, is easily the 
best the company has shown us so far. 

Next week "Pinafore" is to be done by the company. 
* * * 
Pantages Theatre. 

The bill offered this week at the Pantages Theatre is a good 
one in every respect. Headed by "The Girls from the Golden 
West," who render musical numbers in a manner to win enthu- 
siastic applause, there is sufficient merriment and wholesome 
enjoyment to satisfy the most exacting lover of vaudeville. 
The Golden West Girls, under the leadership of Miss Cora 
Carson, are wonderful musicians, the latter having a splendid 
pair of lungs, as is evidenced by her playing on the largest 
bass horn ever seen on the stage. Myrtle Vane, an old-time 
player of "heavies" in melodrama, takes the lead as an "Oblig- 
ing Wife" in one of Walter Montague's sketches, which pro- 
duces whirlwinds of laughter and applause. Ed. Vinton, with 
his little dog, Buster, takes a merited share of the approval of 
the audience, and "Those Four Kids" delight with their truly 
kiddish pranks and nonsense. Two refreshing rag-time enter- 
tainers, Adair and Hickey, and Grace Nardini, an accordionist, 
make a decided hit, while Harry Fisher and company have a 
cycling act which is a novelty in spite of the number of such 
acts on the vaudeville stage. The ever-funny Keystone pic- 
tures conclude the bill, which is a winner from start to finish. 



Critic — The heroine of your story, old man, is simply 

wonderful. Author (delightedly) — You think so? Critic — 
Yes. You say on page ten that she hissed "You are a liar!" 
and any woman who can hiss such a sentence as that can't help 
being wonderful. — Boston Transcript. 



Balladist — Don't you think if I'd cut out one of my four 

songs it would improve my act? Stage Manager — Yes; about 
twenty-five per cent. — Brooklyn Life. 



"I hope you don't object to my children practicing their 

music lessons," said the fourth-floor tenant xo his neighbor be- 
low stairs. "On the contrary," said the neighbor. "It has given 
me a first-class reason for demanding a reduction in my rent." 
— Exchange. 



Goodfellow (with newspaper) — Here's an old bachelor 

in Ohio died and left all his money to the woman who rejected 
him. Cynicus — And yet they say there is no gratitude in the 
world. — Boston Transcript. 



Pantages' Theatre 

Week Starting Sunday Matinee, July 13th 



Market Street opposite Mason 



ALISKEY'S SWEET SINGERS FROM SOUTHERN SEAS. "A Night in Hawaii:" 
CLAY GREENE'S THIRD DEGREE TLAYLET. "The I'olice Inspector:" 
COOGAN 4 COX. "As You Like It:" BELLE OLIVER. "Tetrazzini of Rob- 
time:" FLORENZ TRIO. "Fun in a Restaurant: " ZALFREDO. "Ysaye ol 
VaudeTill*;" HATHAWAY & MACK, "New York Society Dancers." 

Matinee Daily at 2:30; Nights at 7:15 and 9:15. Sunday! and Holiday! 
Matinees at 1:30 and 3:30. Nights Continuous From 0:30. 



Tivoli Opera-House 



Phone Sutter 4200 



ONE WEEK ONLY Starting Monday July llih, Gilbert and Sullivan's 
Nautical Optra 

" PINAFORE" 
or The Lass That Loved a Sailor. Splendid Cast. Big SinginK Chorus. Famous 
Tivoli Orchestra. "For we sail the ocean blue and our saucy ship's a beauty" 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

POPULAR PRICES— 25c. 50c. and 75c. Box Seats $1.00 
Next Monday— Mikado 



fFarrell Street near Powell 



Alcazar Theatre m 

Monday Evening. July 1-1, and Throughout the Week, the San Fram-isfoFavuriii' 

BESSIE BARRISCALE 
Ai«led by Howard Hickman and the Alcazar Company in Channing Pollock's 
Charming Comedy. 

"SUCH A LITTLE QUEEN" 
Splendidly acted and staged. 

Prices — Nights, 25c. to $1; matinees, 25c. to 50c. Matinee Thurs- 
day. Saturday, Sunday. 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Geary and Mason Streets 
Phone Franklin 150 

The Leading Playhouse 



Gottlob, Marx &. Co.. Managers 

A POSITIVE FURORE. Playing to enormous throngs. SECOND BIG WEEK 

BEGINS SUNDAY JULY 13. MATINEE EVERY DAY at 2:80 

KINEMACOLOR PICTURES 
Two nour Program Includes 

"THE MAKING OF THE PANAMA CANAL," "ACTUAL SCENES m nil 
BALKAN WAR," "JAPANESE WAR MANEUVERS." "u. s. BATTLESHIPS IN" 
REVIEW AND PRACTICE." "SPECIAL TRAVEL TALK." 
Prices. Matinees any seat i5c. Evening. Reserved 25c.. :15c. and -50c. 
J U LY 20— Third Week Kinemacolor— New Featur.-s. 



Orph 



. ■ . ««« O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 

eUVYL Phone Douglas 70 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theater -in America 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 
VAUDEVILLE AT ITS BEST 

IRENE FRANKLIN, the American Comedienne assisted by Burt Green nt 
the Piano: THEODORE BENDIX The Noted Composer and Conductor and 
His Symphony Plnj its: MclNTYRE & IIARTY "The Sugar Plum Girlie and 
the Marshmallow Boy:" MOKAN & WISER. Comedy Boomerang Hat Throwers: 
GOYT TRIO. Novelty Gymnasts: THE LE GROHS: NEW ORPHEUM MOTION 
PICTURES. Showing Current Events: Last Week— Immense Hits, MACK and 
RAMBEAU in "Kick In" and CLARK and BERGMAN in Jesse L. Lasky's 
Latest Tabloid Musical l.lay "THE TRAINED NURSES." 

Evening prices — 10c, 25c. 50c, 75c Box seats, $1. Matinee 
prices (except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 25c, 50c 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



VISIT THE 



New China Cafe 



CHOP SUEY 



The Largest and most Exclusive Chinese Restaurant In Oakland, 
Oriental and American Dishes prepared under the supervision 
of expert chefs. Merchants' Lunch dally (except Sunday) 

11 a. m. to 2 p. m., 25c and 35c. 

Special Music Quality and Service Unexcelled 

462 Twelfth Street, between Washington and Broadway, Upstairs 

You will find this Cafe Sanitary, Homelike and Attractive 

The moving "Chop Suey" sign will direct you 

W. C. LEE, Manager 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



THE AMERICANISM OF SHORTRIDGE 

A Stirring Lesson i.i That True Patriotism Which Alone Can 
Make for True Citizenship 

"A government of the people and by the people must receive 
from the people whatever makes it respected at home or 
abroad," declared Samuel M. Shortridge, who delivered the 
Fourth of July oration at the ceremonies held in Golden Gate 
Park on Friday last. The speaker asserted that any decay in 
individual character meant the inevitable decay of the State. 

Basing his oration upon these two fundamental truths, Mr. 
Shortridge appealed to his hearevs in a manner which should 
strike a responsive chord in the heart of every man, woman 
and youth in the nation. His appeal to his hearers and his 
eulogy of the nation's past, couched in brilliant, and at times 
sublime periods, rang with a sincerity which displayed an 
Americanism which should be aimed at by every man and wo- 
man who desires above all else to make of this democracy of 
ours what the Fathers of our country made possible in writing 
that document which is the American Constitution — a nation 
revered both at home and abroad. 

To those who, because of the narrowness of pessimism and 
lack of true patriotism, would fill the minds of the people with 
doubt and disrespect for the institutions which our fathers 
fought and died to build, Mr. Shortridge said: "You who- 
magnify present ills and forget our many blessings, can you 
show us a land where there is more political equality, more 
comfort and happiness among the people, more justice dis- 
pensed, more charity bestowed?" 

The speaker, in demanding that citizens of the United States 
should be not only grateful for having shared in a glorious past 
but thankful for being partakers of a fruitful present, admin- 
istered a stinging rebuke to all who would doubt the present 
and mistrust the future, and declared that "our stability, our 
greatness, our perpetuity, our glory depend, not upon standing 
armies, not upon navies . . . but upon the general diffusion of 
intelligence and political knowledge among our people, upon 
a right understanding and a corresponding appreciation and dis- 
charge of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship." 

And, following the ideal expressed in those ringing words, 
Mr. Shortridge voiced what is most potential in the building of 
that true and ideal citizenship when he urged, "In our schools 
let not only abstract truth, morality and the various handicrafts 
be taught; let love for that blessed banner, patriotism, loyalty, 
be inculcated; let the fundamental, eternal and realized prin- 
ciples and truths of the Declaration of Independence be written 
on the heart and engraved on the mind of youth, so that the 
rising generation, proud of their country and grateful for their 
heritage, may come more fervently to love the land of their 
birth, and to practice those virtues in the administration of 
public affairs which alone can render their country respectable 
among the nations of the earth." 

Denouncing those among us who would tear down and ruth- 
lessly destroy the principles of our Constitution with present- 
day notions such as those which threaten ths functions of our 
government and our judiciary, the speaker asserted that "those 
who would preserve a government must love it." He declared 
in no uncertain terms that above all else, the youth of the land, 
and those new citizens who are coming among us, should be 
taught the "awful danger that must inevitably befall this 
country, their country, by the development of opposing and 
antagonistic classes, from the lack of homogeneity, the lack 
of common hopes and lofty, pure, self-denying and disinter- 
ested patriotism." 

In this day of so much brazen jingoism and a form of loyalty 
which is an insult to the flag and citizenship it pretends to ac- 
knowledge and revere, the Americanism voiced in the oration of 
Mr. Shortridge rises to such lofty heights as to make us believe 
that it is possible for us to be worthy descendants of those 
men whom, on our nation's natal day, we commemorate as the 
Fathers of Freedom. The closing words of Mr. Shortridge 
touch a sublime height which should cause Americans from 
coast to coast to be fired anew with an Americanism which will 
give to this government of and by the people all that which will 
make it continue truly great as it has been in the past. 

"If," said the speaker, "in contemplating her material 
grandeur and reflecting upon the countless blessings she has 
conferred upon man, I have spoken of my country, not with the 
'cold neutrality of an impartial judge.' but in the warmer lan- 



guage of the enthusiast; if, in presenting her claims to your 
affections and your loyalty I have seemed unconscious of the 
blots that may have marred or dimmed her true glory, un- 
mindful of her faults or indifferent to her shortcomings, it is 
because, upon this hallowed day, when recounting her struggles 
and triumphs and gifts, T love to forget the accuracy of a judge 
in the veneration of a worshiper and the gratitude of a child." 



DOES BIG ADVERTISING PAY? 
_ Is summer selling of country lands successful? Is money too 
tight for farm investments? Does big advertising in vacation 
season pay? These and some more questions like them are be- 
ing answered in a way calculated to silence the croakers by 
A. J. Rich & Co., selling agents for Solano Irrigated Farms. It 
took just fifteen days for the firm's sales to pass the $600,000 
mark, and those who have watched the campaign that flew' in 
the face of all precedents are gasping in surprise. 

Incidentally, Rich & Co. are not considering any let-up. They 
are getting ready to put the second 10,000 acre unit on the mar- 
ket at once, and they are going to carry their selling campaign 
into Southern California. 

They are going into the game with the big arguments that 
inexhaustible water from the Sacramento River is an eternal 
guarantee of bumper crops, and that farm land within forty 
miles of San Francisco is a tempting location for the producer 
who wants to reach the biggest market at the lowest cost for 
freight. 

Patrick Calhoun, in talking to Rich & Co.'s salesmen about 
the project, said that seventy per cent of the farm products 
consumed in the Bay cities comes from beyond the fifty mile 
radius. This showing insures a demand for everything that 
Solano County can produce. The nearness to the city, the 
water haul through canals reaching into the heart of the 
property, two electric lines and the Southern Pacific to afford 
competing rail service, are factors that make Solano farm in- 
vestments of more than ordinary interest. 



SUMMER FURNITURE 



SALE 



we are now selling ALL Summer furniture, 
comprised of our full lines of the following: 

IMPORTED GRASS CHAIRS, ROCKERS, SET- 
TEES, TABLES, STOOLS, BAS- 
KETS, MUFFIN STANDS, 
SEWING TABLES 

RUSTIC HICKORY SWINGS, GATEWAYS, 
ROOFED LAWN SEATS, 
SWINGS, FENCE, TABLES, 
CHAIRS, ROCKERS, STOOLS, 
ETC. 



Also Our Full Lines of 



GERMAN REED FURNITURE, 
CHINA REED FURNITURE, 
INDIA REED FURNITURE, 
GERMAN WILLOW FURNI- 
TURE, RUSTIC CEDAR FUR- 
NITURE, CANVAS FOLDING 
CHAIRS, HAMMOCKS, ETC., 
ETC., ETC. 



JOS 



At 25 % Off 

FREDERICKS & 



SEE 



CO 

^P COR STOCKTON &. POST STS. 

OUR WINDOW DISPLAY 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 




The general monotony of the dull season was broken this 
week by the advent of the Hennen Jennings family at the John 
C. Coleman home in California street. Mr. and Mrs. Jennings 
arrived here Wednesday with their daughter, Miss Katherine, 
who, by the way, promises to become as popular here as she is 
in her home in Washington, where she belongs to the younger 
society set. 

Miss Jennings and her aunt, Janet Coleman, might be sisters, 
their birthdays are so near together. Friends of Janet are aw- 
fully amused when introduced to her young lady niece. It is 
some years since the Jennings have been in California, and then 
Katherine was not grown up, so acquaintances see quite a 
change in her. 

Mrs. Jennings is a sister of Misses Janet and Persis Coleman. 
Their father, and their uncle, the late Edward Coleman, both 
struck it rich in Grass Valley during the gold rush, and 
promptly moved with their families to San Francisco, where 
they buili fine homes, side by side, on the corner of California 
and Franklin streets. The John C. Coleman family still live 
in the old house, preferring its high ceilings and spacious rooms 
to the cramped quarters of the modern households, and their 
well kept lawn, dotted with daisies, is still as great a delight to 
the eye as it was in its first season, several decades ago. 

Edward Coleman's home, after he passed away about six 
months ago, was left to his nieces and nephews. The quaint 
old man made a delightfully curious will, in which he stated 
that the house should be maintained as a sort of a family "old 
people's home." His idea was that it should be kept up to 
receive the members of his own family in their old age, and he 
left one of his nieces to see to the upkeep of the place. 

While they are here, the Jennings will be an agreeable addi- 
tion to society. It is hoped that their visit will cause the 
Coleman girls to go about more than is their habit. 

Miss Jennings is not a bit like her aunts in their predilec- 
tion for the simple life, and the old house will doubtless be as 
lively as any in the city while she is here. 

see 

_ The sad news that Peter Martin is ill in Paris with an affec- 
tion of the brain which might leave his mind permanently im- 
paired, has reached his friends in San Francisco, who are ex- 
pressive in their sympathy for his mother, Mrs. Eleanor Martin. 
Mrs. Martin is such a remarkable woman for her eighty odd 
years, and it seems a pity that after she has lived all these 
years she should undergo this sorrow. She keeps up bravely, 
however, and her remarkable courage is an example to many a 
younger woman. She recently attended the golf tournament at 
Del Monte with her son, Downey Harvey, and his family, and 
apparently enjoyed the tournament with the younger people. 

The Martin family claim that they have heard nothing of 
Peter's serious condition, although it has been feared that his 
health has been failing for several years. He is with his wife 
and their young son in Paris now, but is expected shortly in 
Newport, where they have taken a cottage. 
© © © 
Speaking of Californians abroad, Mrs. Thomas Bishop and 
her son Frank are being welcomed home from a tour of the 
world, and the Bishop home in California street is again open, 
after having been boarded up and the furniture shrouded in 
linen coverings for many months. The Bishops have a large 
ranch in Santa Barbara, which is the delight of their friends 
who are so fortunate as to be invited down to spend a week or 
more on the place. Mrs. Bishop and her three sons are jolly 
company, and keep the ranch lively with dancing, music and 
congenial company. Tom and Jim are both extremely popular 
in the clubs here, and as bon vivants and cavaliers are welcomed 
wherever there is a good time in anticipation. Frank is also 
full of fun, but is quite devoted to his mother, and has more 
of a taste for a quiet life than the other two boys. 



The buds, belles and bachelor maids will be glad when Clar- 
ence Follis comes to San Francisco to give society a glimpse of 
his handsome, breezy, charming self, which it gets once a year 
when the young bachelor drops in upon us from New York for 
a bit of bracing Western air. Clarence is young, rich, hand- 
some and unmarried. What more tempting in the way of mas- 
culine perfections could be set before a queen? All our Cali- 
fornia girls are queens, Clarence thinks. That is perhaps why 
he has not chosen one from among the enticing number. The 
impartiality of his attentions is cause for both joy and grief, 
and he gracefully slips the noose. 
© © © 

Dot Palmer's betrothal to Lieutenant George Speer U. S. A. 
was news in army circles. Miss Palmer is an exceedingly 
popular girl, not the least like the conventional girl usually 
found at an army post, but possessing an independence that 
many girls in the business world would envy. Dorothy and her 
sister went East last winter to study art. They took a studio in 
New York, and went in for serious study. It was interrupted by 
Cupid, who had long been striving to turn Miss Palmer's heart 
away from a career. But now that she has made her choice, 
her engagement will be a short one. Her marriage to Lieuten- 
ant Speer will be an event of September, and it is more than 
probable that the young couple will spend their honeymoon in 
the Philippines, where Lieutenant Speer's regiment is ex- 
pected to be stationed. 

© © © 

The arrival of Lieutenant Harold Naylor and Mrs. Naylor 
from Fort Riley, Kan., is eagerly anticipated. Mrs. Naylor 
made her debut here, when her father, Colonel William A. 
Simpson, was ranking officer of this Coast. She was imme- 
diately proclaimed a belle, and for a time the service feared 
that it might lose her to a civilian gallant. 

Mrs. Simpson's father had the unique experience of the man 
in the novel whose friends believed him to be dead, and showed 
their appreciation for him with an elaborate funeral. There 
were two Colonel Simpsons, one the father of Peggy Naylor 
and the other the father of William Fitzhugh Lee Simpson. 

Lieutenant Simpson's father died a few months ago, and 
Mrs. Naylor found herself the recipient of letter after letter of 
condolence, when as a matter of fact, her father was not the 
victim of the Great Conqueror, but was very much alive and 
active in his capacity of Acting Adjutant-General of the De- 
partment of New York. 

Colonel Simpson had a great laugh over the error, but also 
shed a few furtive tears. He realized that it was not every 
man's privilege to witness the grief over his own funeral. 
© © © 

Harry Scott is about to prove himself a dauntless 
sportsman when he and several young habitues of the golf links 
sail from this port for the Behring Sea, as guests of John C. 
Borden of Chicago, on his ship Adventuress. The men evi- 
dently expect to make some valuable discoveries in natural his- 
tory, for they are taking Roy C. Andrews of the American 



BLACK & WHITE 

SGOTGH WHISKY 

The Highest Standard ot Quality 



ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front St., San Francisco 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Museum of the Natural Sciences of New York, also a crew of 
twelve men and several guides. The adventurers have decided 
upon no particular route or destination, and they will doubtless 
live on gumdrops and peguins before they return to civiliza- 
tion. The men intend to lead a primitive life. Harry Scott 
has even declared his intention of giving up cigarettes for a 
corn-cob pipe. Harry's determination to forsake Lady Nico- 
tine, however, is not taken seriously. He is one of her most 
devoted swains. But while he is on his bachelor cruise, all of 
his favorite pastimes will be neglected. 

In the meantime, Harry's sister, Mrs. Walter Martin, is 
spending her summer between town and Burlingame. Occa- 
sionally she and a party of friends motor into town and make 
a detour of the resorts and cabarets, setting the fashion for 
slumming it in San Francisco. Mary Martin, though, is always 
judiciously accompanied by her husband on these larks, and he 
seems to enjoy it as much as his popular wife. 

© © © 

Members of the Ophite Club this week entertained at a box 
party in the Orpheum Theatre, ending with a banquet especi- 
ally prepared for them at Techau Tavern complimentary to 
Ensign Hamilton Vose Bryan, a 1913 graduate of Annapolis, 
who joins the cruiser California, and Raymond Potter Camp- 
bell and Cyrus Geness Wilder, both on furlough from West 
Point. Speeches, mingled with goodfellowship, and entertain- 
ing prevailed. The party was a farewell to Campbell and 
Wilder, who return to the Point to remain two years more, 
and followed an elaborate garden party and dance for a hun- 
dred of the younger set by Mrs. Thomas Benton Potter and her 
daughter, Mrs. Harry M. Johnson, at their home in Alameda. 
The Ophites is one of the most exclusive organizations of social 
circles in San Francisco, composed of members of the younger 
set, and their affairs are events to be remembered among those 
fortunate enough to be listed as their guests. Among those 
present were : Alhert Raisch, Marshall McCormick, Clyde 
Payne, Jr., Cecil C. Caldwell, Jack Conway, Roger Corson, 
Roy Cameron, Bert Forrest, Frederick Keyston, Arthur Malm, 
Wm. Morris, Stewart Masten, Kendall Masten, Mervyn W. 
Jackson, Alfred Garcia, Louis Lloyd, Jerry Mahoney, Marshall 
Paris. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BCAUTLTIER 

Remove* T»n, Pimple*, FrecUn. Moth-Patch**, 
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taite it to be Hire it it properly made Accept no 
counterfeit of nrmlar name. Thediitinguiihed Dr. 
L. A. Say re taid to a lady of the tuat • to* (a panVnt) i 
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For tale by all Dniagim and Fancy Goodi Dealer*. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infanta and adultt. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieve* Skin Irritariont, eurea Sua- 
bum and tenderi an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cent*, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Remove! Superfluout Hair. Price SI. 00. by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. PropV. H Creal Jones St.. New York dy. 




PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

Tea served in Tapestry Room 
from four to six o'clock 

Special Music Fixed Price 

A DAILY SOCIAL EVENT 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Fireproof 



Rates $1.00 and up 
F. J. McHENRY. Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

THIRTEENTH AND HARRISON STREETS, Oakland, California 
Absolutely fireproof Class A construction. Erected 
at a cost of $2,000,000. Perfect service and un- 

surpassed cuisine. Afternoon tea from 4 until 

6 o'clock. Music. 

European plan only Tariff $1.50 per day up 

Under Management of VICTOR REITER 
Electric Bus Meets All Trains 



M 



Scientific Treatment 
SCALP 

FACIAL 

MANICURING 

166 GEARY ST, 
Phone Douglas 977 SAN FRANCISCO 



BUTLER-NELKE 
ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ART 

Alcazar Theatre Building 

MIRIAM NELKE - Director 

Dramatic Art Elocution, Dialect, Literature, French. 

Fencing, Dancing and Make-up. Fall term begins Aug. 11th 



CASTLE CRAGS 



Under same management as Hotel Del Monte. 

On main Oregon automobile highway and S. P. R. R. 

In the yellow pine forests of the Upper Sacramento River. 

Wonderful summer climate; bright warm days and coolnights. 

Beautiful trails through the shady forests for pedestrians or 
riding parties. 

Plenty of gentle horses and good guides. 

Automobiles for hire. 



The motor ride through 20,000 acres of virgin yellow pine 
forests is unequaled in California. 

Arrange your motor trips so as to stop over at CASTLE 
CRAGS for a day or two. Garage for automobiles; 
gasoline and oils. 

Rates: $18 to $24 per week. 

For beautifully illustrated folder and reservations, address, 
MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS, CALIFORNIA. 







San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



SOCHL-PERSONSL ITEMS 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 
AITKEN-SIMPSON. — Judge and Mrs. John R. Aitken announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Miss Florence Aitken, to Lieutenant 
"William Fitzhugh Lee Simpson of the Sixth Infantry stationed at 
the Presidio. 
BLEECKER-BREWSTER — Mrs. A. C. Ducat, widow of the late Colonel 
Duncan Ducat, U. S. A., announces the engagement of her daughter, 
Mrs. Elise Bleecker, to Stuart Brewster, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
E. Brewster, of Leavenworth, Kan. 
PICKERING -AIAHIN. — An engagement of interest in army circles all 
over the country and in civilian circles here and in Monterey, where 
the family resided for many years, is that of Miss Margaret Mauree 
Pickering and Lieutenant Frank Cadcl Mahin, of the Eleventh U. S. 
Infantry, which was announced last week. 
PIERCE-EISEN. — The engagement of Miss Ruth Fairbanks Pierce and 
Percy Augustus Elsen, of Los Angeles, was announced at a tea given 
by Mrs. Fidelity Pierce at her home in California street on Wed- 
nesday. 
MERRITT-LINDLEY. — Mrs. Elizabeth Lane Merrltt, of this city, an- 
nounced the engagement of her daughter, Miss Ariadne Merrltt, to 
Philo Leonard Llndlay, of Los Angeles, during th< week. 
MIGEL-LEVY. — Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Migel announce the engagement of 

their daughter, Miss Myrtle Migel, to Louis C. Levy, of Oakland. 
LYONS-McMTJRRY.— The engagement of Ralph F. McMurry, of Redding, 

and Miss Hazel Lyons, of San Francisco, is announced. 
STEELE-MXLBURN.— The engagement of Miss Nancy Steele and Mr 

Devereux Milburn was recently announced in New York. 
WILL-GRANT. — Society here is much interested in the announcement of 
the betrothal of Mrs. America Will, of Marshalltown, Iowa, and 
Ulysses S. Grant, son of the late President and Mrs. FJ. .S. Grant. Mr. 
Grant has many relatives and friends here. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
GALLOIS-HILL. — Miss Jeanne Gallois and Mr. Horace Hill will lie mar- 
ried on Saturday, Juiy 26th, at the apartments of Mrs. Eugene Gal- 
lois at the Fairmont. Mr. John Gallois will be best man, and the 
bride's uncle, Mr. Albert Pissis. will give her away. 
PETERSON-MA1LLARD. — Miss Kate Peterson and Mr. Ward Maillard 
will be married September 20th at tin race of the bride's parents 

in Belvedere. 
PAGE-BUCKINGHAM.— Miss Dorothy Page and Mr. Charles L. Bucking- 
ham will be married on September 6th at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Page in Belvedere. 
PALMER-SPEER. — The marriage of Miss Dorothy Palmer and Lieutenant 
George Alexander Speer. TJ. S. A., will take place the second week 
in September, though the exact date has not yet been decided upon. 
SCHELLER-RUTLEDGE.— Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Scheller of Los Angeles 
announced the engagement of their daughter, Genevieve, to Mr. John 
D. Rutledge, a local attorney, at a luncheon given in their home in 
Los Angeles recently. 
SELBY-HAYDEN. — A pretty mid-summer wedding will be that of Miss 
Mary Selby and Curtiss Crane Hayden, whose marriage will take 
place this afternoon at Grace Pro -Cathedral. 
TALBOT-WILSON. — One of the society events Of the early fall in Wash- 
ington, will be the marriage of Miss Amylita Talbot and Charles 
Wilson. The wedding will be a largi church affair with a reception 
afterwards. 
WILSON -FAIR LIE. — A wedding to add interest to the midsummer is that 
of Miss Grace Wilson and Mr. Hugh Fairlie, which is set for August 
14th. 

WEDDINGS. 
ANDERSON-GOODE. — Miss Esther Anderson and Mr. Joseph H. Goode 
were married at St. Paul's Episcopal Church last Saturday afternoon 
in the presence of the members of the two families, all joining In 
a wedding breakfast served at one of the down-town cafes ■ ■"• r, 
ARMSTRONG-BARRY. — St. Dominie's priory was the scene Of a pretty 
wedding last Tuesday evening, when Miss Margaret Armstrong, the 
daughter of Sergeant of Detectives Armstrong, became the bride of 
Edward I. Barry, a young attorney of this city. 
BREW-HARDIGG.— The marriage of Miss Josephine Beatrice Brew and 
Lieutenant William Hardigg took place at Newport News, Va., on 
Monday evening at the home of the bride's parents. 
HEANEY-STARTZMAN.— Mr. and Mrs. John Heaney have issued cards 

announcing the marriage of their daughter, Miss Ma)zle Heaney, to 
Mr. M. Bradford Startzman on June 18, 1913. In San Rafael. 
HORK-SCIIWALEN.— Miss Urselle Clementine Hork and Mr. Bernard 

Victor Schwalen were married at Hamilton, Montana, during the pasi 

week, the ceremony taking place at St. Francis Catholii Church. 
JENSEN-WILLIAMS. — Mrs. P. C. Jensen, of Watsonvllle, announces the 

marriage of her daughter, Anna, to Mr. Albert K, Williams, of Sail 

Lake. 
LATZ-BLOCK. — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Latz announce the marriage of 

their daughter, Miss Rose Latz. to M. H. Block. Monday. June 16th, 

at the Century Club. 
REID-ROBSON. — Miss Barbara Lucretla Reid and Ralph Ewart Robson 

were married recently at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and 

Mrs. R. L. Reld, in Berkeley. 



SHIRLEY-FRICKELTON.— The marriage of Miss" Irene Shirley and 

Mr, Frank Scott Frlckelton has been announced. 
TYLER-WEYMOUTH.— A wedding of interest In literary cinq. 

celt brated In Mill Valley reci nrly, when Miss Frances Woodward 

Tyler became the bride of William J. Weymouth of this city. Rev. 

Robert Sesnon officiated at the Impressive service, which was wit- 
id by only the membi rs ol the Immediate families. 

LUNCHEONS. 

FGSS.— Mrs. Benj. Foss, Iting her parents, Mr. and Mrs, Wil- 

fred Chapman, was the guest of honor at an informal luncheon re- 
cently, given by Mrs. Henrietto Blanding at the Blanding home in 
Belvei i 

HERRICK.— Mrs. Lester Herrick war, hostess al li delightful lu 
several days ago at the Hotel Vendome'. 

SPROULE.— Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule were the guests Oi honor at a 
luncheon U iren by Mr. and Mrs. Langdon Ervl 

the Monteclto Country Club. 

WALKER.— Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Walker, who are at the Hob I Pi 

Santa Barbara for sever:'! weeks, were hosts at B luncheon there n 

cently, later taking their gui ■■ to tb< garden party and da given 

by Mr. and Mrs. Milo Potter and their daughter. 

WHITNEY.— Mrs. J. Win ■ tfrs, G. Martin were luncheon hosts ai 

the Palace Hotel last Frl 

TEAS. 

GUNDLACH- Mrs. H. k Gundlacl ess at a pretty tea during 

the week, at which was anm betrothal o1 .Miss 

Gertrude Hlnz, 13 Duke Edw; rds, 

STENGER. — Mrs. George Stenger Is visiting hei ah w i ,,■■. 

In First a 1 . ■ latter gave an - . in h.-r honoi Dll 

Wednesday. 

MOTORING. 

CLAYBITRGH.- Mrs. .^ A. Clayburgh and a party of friends have made 
arrangements to motor to Cai ta 

GIBBS.— Mrs. Geo. Gibbs, Miss Margarel Nichols and Miss Helen 

son left by motor recently for Del Monte. 

SESSIONS. — Mr. and Mrs. David R. Sessions and thi -, .Miss 

Jeannette Sessions left recently for a tour of Alaska. 

THORN. — Dr. and Mrs. Walton ghti r motored Bouth 

. last week, and visited a number of the resorts en route. 

WEBER LAKE CLUB.— The Weber Lake C wae formei 

the pleasure of the out-of- attracting a 

goodly gathering. Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Stovel and Miss Marian Stovel 
made the trip to the lake in their machine, with two or thn 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick S. Moody and their three Bi ing up 

for the major part of the month with Mrs. Beverly MacMonag 
Douglas MacMonagle. Mr. and Mrs. Jns< ph D Grant and the Misses 
Josephine and Edith Grant will also take advantage of their mem- 
bership this month. 

ZEILE.— Miss Marian Zeil'e ace" [r. and Mrs. Talbot Walker and 

.Miss Helen Keeney in the Walker's automobile to Santa Barbara, 

MUSICALES. 

COOK.— Mr. and Mrs. Wm. HolY Cool asantly Informal mu 

on Saturday evening in honor of Mrs. Frank Allen. 
DINNERS. 
CHICKEIUNG.— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chiekering entertained .it I i 

somely appointed dinner in the Hotel Potter, 6 pa, recently. 

GARLICK. — Mrs. W. II. Garliek was hostess at a delightful dinner parts 

at the Hotel Victoria on Tu riing. 

FOLGER; — Mr. and Mrs. A. Folgcr gave a dinner at their home recently. 
INNES. — Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Innes entertained at dinner recent! 3 In 

honor of Mr. L. H. Norris. 
MARTIN. — Dr. and Mrs. William A ntertained some Of their 

friends at a dinner on Saturday evening in honor of Miss Qeraldine 

I'itz^Ibbon and Ralph Heger. 
MOORE.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore gave a dinner and dance at 

their country home near Santa Ci trday night, In honor of 

Major and Mrs. Sidney Cloman. 
PARDOW. — Mr. Robert Pardow entertained ten of his friends at an 

elaborate dinner recently at Castle Crags, 
ARRIVALS. 
HUYANV. -1 T, and Mrs. W A. Bryant and Miss Marie Louise Bi 

have returned to their home in Broderiek street. 
GUMMING S.— Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cummln^s have n 'rued to their home 

in this city after a sojourn at Aetna Springs. • 

DE SABLA. — Eugene de Sabla has returned* to the family home at El 

Cerii<> :■ >■ several days' visit Id Los Angeles 

EA LAN! ».—Mrs. Kate stow Baland has come tip from Santa Barbara, and 

will oecupy the house of Miss Frano ' 
GRIFFITH.— Mr. and Mrs. Milieu Griffith returned to town this week. 

They were the guests of Mr. Griffith's mother In Ross Valley, 
HILL. — Mrs. Horace I llll, Mrs. Eugene Gallois and 11 c< Hill, Jr.. have 

returned from s motor trip through Lake Co 
HYDE-SMITH,— Mr* arrived from Honolulu, 

and win spend the summer visiting hei slatei 
k 1:1.1. a.m. — Mt, and Mrs. George Kellam ha I from Menlo 

after a visit to Mr, ■ k Sharon. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Euyene i-ayne, dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



COOL. — Dr. Lu Ella Cool and Mrs. C. C. Freeman, who have been spend- 
ing a few days .at Los Angeles and Sierra Mad re. have returned to the 
Cadillac Hotel. 

KRUTTSCHNITT.— Mrs. Violet Kruttschnitt arrived on the Mongolia from 

Japan, where she has been for the past two months. 
LATHltor, — Mr. and Mrs. Charles G, Lathrop have returned, and are 

at Palo Alto for the summer. 
McBEAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Athol McBean have returned from Burlingame*. 

where they spent the holidays with Mrs. MeBean's parents. 
McKENNA. — Justice and Mrs. Jos. McKenna have returned from an ex- 
tended trip to Europe, where they go every summer. 
McNEAR. — John McNear, who lias been spending the last few weeks at 

Coronado as the guest of John D. Spreckels. has returned home. 
MAGEE. — Mr. and Mrs. Tom Magee have returned from Castle Gragfl. 
MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin and her son, Downey Harvey, have re- 
turned to the Martin home in Broadway. 
METCALF. — Mrs. Victor Metcalf, Jr., has returned from Lake Tahoe. 
MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller and their daughter, Miss Leslie 

Miller, have returned to town after a few days' visit with Mr. and 

Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden at Burlingame. 
SHORE. — Mrs. J. de Barth Shorb hasreturned to her home in Broadway, 

after a visit in Napa County. 

DEPARTURES. 
ASHE. — Mrs. Sidney Algernon Ashe has gone to Colorado Springs for 

the month of July. 
BURKE. — Richard Burke, his daughter, Miss Edith Burke, and his son, 

Richard, Burke, Jr., left this week for New York. 
COWDIN.— Mr. and Mrs. J. Cheever Cowdin arid their small son have 

gone to San Mateo for the summer. 
HERRICK. — Mr. and Mrs. Lester Herrick have gone to the Hotel Ven- 

dome for the summer. 
HOTALING. — Mrs. A. P. Hotaling, Miss Jane Hotaling and Miss Frances 

Stewart have gone to Tahoe for the month. 
McKENZIE. — Mrs. J. S. McKenzie has gone to Castle Crags to pass the 

month of July, 
PILLSBURY. — Mrs. Horace Davis Pillsbury and children left recently 

for Boston. 
SHIPP. — Lieut. Earl Shlpp, U. S. N.', has gone south, where he will be on 

duty for a month or two. 

INTIMATIONS. 
BARRON. — Mr. and Mrs. Ward 'Barron and their little daughter are to 

leave within a fortnight for Europe. 
HOBART. — Mrs. Hannah Williams Hobart and Miss Mary Eyre, who 

have been spending the summer in Honolulu and Japan, will be 

home shortly for the summer. 
McCOMA-S. — Frank McComas will soon leave for Arizona, where he will 

spend the next month or two on the desert painting. 
MADDGX. — Mrs. Virginia Maddox and her son, Knox Maddox, are at Del 

Monte for this month, 
MONTEAGLE. — Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Monteagle and their sons will be 

home sometime this month. 
PAYOT. — Mrs. Henry Payot spent several days during the past week at 

the Hotel Vendome in San Jose. 
TRISTAN.— Count and Countess Philllpe de Tristan and their children 

are en route to France to visit their relatives for the summer. 
TUBBS. — Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs and their niece, Misa Charlotte 

Tubbs, are at present In Carlsbad. 
WHITNEY. — Dr. and Mrs. James Whitney have left San Jose for Shfcflta, 

where they will pass the remainder of the month 



AN ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The following announcement reached us through the mail 
this week, but the sender failed to sign his or her name, or to 
afford the News Letter any means of ascertaining his or her 
identity. Judging, however, from the character of the an- 
nouncement, our informant must be a close friend and reader 
of the San Francisco Bulletin. Not being in the confidence of 
the gentleman who presides over the literary and editorial 
policy of the evening daily, we are not able to confirm the in- 
telligence, but deem it to be in the interests of our readers to 
make the information public in case such an enlargement of 
the sensational revelations of the Bulletin is contemplated. 
Following is the announcement as it came to our office : 

"The San Francisco Bulletin is about to issue a popular edi- 
tion of 'The Memoirs of Francis Hill, a Woman of Pleasure.' 
This book, written by a clergyman, has too long been denied 
general circulation by a false and official modesty. The Bulle- 
tin has now broken down the spite-fence built around the under- 
world, and its achievement in that respect is endorsed by the 
club ladies of San Francisco, to whom it now presents this 
volume of the experiences of a woman of that world, from de- 
parture from her country home, a virgin, to her putting on of the 
scarlet robe. It is an impressive narrative, that supplements 
and projects the good work already done by the Bulletin in dis- 
closing the sexual secrets of the oldest of professions." 



Medium — Ah, I have a message from the person you 

wanted. He says he is very happy, and has met Napoleon, 
Washington, Caesar, Mark Twain and Lydia Pinkham. Jones — 
Gee! but he's a hustler! He only died an hour ago. — Judge. 



"I am sorry, madam," said the judge, addressing the 

convicted suffragette, "but I must commit you to jail for ten 
days. If you have any requests to make of the Court before 
sentence is executed, I shall be glad to hear them." "Oh, no, 
Judge, thank you," said the lady; "there isn't anything, except, 
perhaps, if you don't mind, I'd like to have my maid committed 
to the same jail, and if you could arrange it so as to give us 
connecting cells with a bath, it would be charming of you." — 
Exchange. 

Pears' 

The ingredients 
in many soaps, re- 
quire free alkali to 
saponify them. 

The rich, cool 
lather of Pears' does 
not result from free 
alkali, fats or rosin. 

Pears' and purity 
are synonymous. 

Matchless for the complexion. 

UNITED STATES BRANCH STATEMENT OF THE CONDITIONS AND 
Affairs of the PALATINE INSURANCE CO., LTD., of London, Eng- 
land, on the 31st day of December, A. D. 1912. and for the year ending 
on that day. Published pursuant to the Provisions of Section 611 of 
the Political Code and compiled from the annual statement filed with 
the Insurance Commissioner of the State of California. 



Assets. 
Cash Market Value of all Stocks and Bonds owned by Com- 

12,624.540.00 

Cash in Banks 804,36! IT 

due and accrued 31.634.00 

Agents' Balances representing business written subsequent to 

October 1. 1912 390.033.37 



TOTAL ASSETS $3,250,576.64 



Liabilities. 

Losses adjusted aii'l unpaid 

in process of Adjustment or in Suspense 

resisted, Including expenses • 

- on Fire Risks running on.- year or loss. 

50 per cent 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running more than one year, 

pro rata ." ■ 

Estimated Taxes hereafter payable based upon this year's 
business 

Brokerage due or to become due 

lie insurance Premiums and Return Premiums 

All other liabilities 



24.238.00 
99.629.68 
23,(82.00 

628.332.41 



86,001.8! 
42.744.26 
t8.04S.40 
10,388.83 



TOTAL LIABILITIES J2.000.005.26 



Income. 

-It actually received for Fire premiums 81,814 

and dividends on Bonds, Stocks, Ixjnns, 

ill other so-.' 119,794.42 

i 'lit on s.ii ■ maturity of I 

1 from Home Office 2.628.21 

TOTAL INCOME , 81.988.462.90 

Expenditures. 
Net amount paid for Fir 

' adjustment and settlement ol 

mission or Brokerage 41 

Paid ' s, and other charges for officers, 



uonal and I- 

bOO) value ol I.,-!.. 1- 

I to Home Office 41' 

All ether Expenditures 96.502.90 





TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



- incurred during the year (FIRE) 



.8966.513.12 

iiims 



Risks and Premiums. 

P.isks 
Net amount of Risks written during '*J2? 

of Bisks ex] - rSStSK 

. nount in force necember S, 

A. H. WRAT. U. S. Manager. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this Mtb^day °^ hT ^ 



16 



San F 



rancisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 




Oriental Tavern 

105 Powell— 108 Ellis Streets 

Most Unique Tavern in 
San Francisco 

Soft Chinese Music 

First Class American 
Dishes and Chop Suey. 

Mercantile Lunch for 
Shoppers. 

Chinese maids in attendance 

Every Friday afternoon a beau- 
tiful present will be given the 
lady holding the lucky number. 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 
RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 



THE $15 VICTROLA 

FITS IN A GRIP 

Take It To The Country 

The $ 1 5 model is a genuine Victrola, 
only smaller than the wonderful original. 
It will fit in a grip or suit-case — no cum- 
bersome horn to carry. 

Fine for dance music. 

Sherman. Kay & Co. 

Steinway and Other Pianos Victor Talking Machines 

Pianola Player Pianos 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Stt., Oakland 



YOSEMITE VALLEY 

A Vacation Ground 

Season 1913 Opens Early 

Yosemlte grows more popular each year. 
Thousands visit It as a sight-seeing trip. 
Other thousands spend their Vacations there 
and live for weeks amid Its grandeurs. 

YOSEMITE THE PLACE FOR REST AND 
RECREATION. 

Dally outings to points of Interest. Jolly 
times around the evening camp fires. Hotels 
and boarding camps for those who wish, and 
private camping under Its pines for those 
who prefer this way. Ask any ticket agent 
for Yosemlte Outing Folder. A BEAUTIFUL 
YOSEMITE SOUVENIR BOOKLET. Mailed 
on receipt of one dollar. A, gem of the print- 
ing art, 32 pages In full colors. Contains no 
advertisements. AddresB. 

YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY. Merced, C«L 




ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Orpheum. — Miss Irene Franklin, who heads the Orpheum 
bill next week, is an American girl who can safely lay claim to 
being one of this country's most popular comediennes. She 
has demonstrated her great ability and wonderful versatility 
both in vaudeville and musical comedy. Her songs are particu- 
larly characteristic, and her method of treating them is thor- 
oughly original. She has the assistance of Mr. Bert Green, 
who plays her accompaniments on the piano. 

Vaudeville has captured another bright musical light in the 
well-known composer and operatic conductor, Theodore Ben- 
dix and his symphony players. He has associated with him 
artists who are famous for their solo, as well as their ensemble 
playing — Michel Bernstein, Jacques Shore and Arthur Bern- 
stein. There will be solos, duets and other attractive numbers, 
the act concluding with the Toreador song and the stirring 
finale from "Carmen." 

The always popular Mclntyre & Harty, "The Sugar Plum 
Girlie and the Marshmallow Boy," will amuse with their 
comedy, songs and witty dialogue. 

Moran & Wiser, Comedy Boomerang Hat Throwers, will ex- 
hibit their skill. They make a number of hats describe all sorts 
of figures in mid-air, and then return to their heads. 

The Goyt Trio will present a clever combination of gymnas- 
tics and animal training. A -feature of the act is a little fox 
terrier named Daisy who accomplishes a number of remark- 
able feats, one of them being a complete somersault to a one- 
toot balance. 

Next week will be the last of the Le Grohs; Willard Mack 
and Marjorie Rambeau, and Clark and Bergman in the best 
musical skit Jesse L. Lasky has sent us, "The Trained Nurses." 

* » * 

Tivoli Opera House. — Notwithstanding the great popularity 
of "Princess Chic," the current offering at the Tivoli, it will 
be removed on Monday night, to give way to a sumptuous re- 
vival of Gilbert & Sullivan's comic opera, "H. M. S. Pinafore." 
Perhaps no revival of any musical work could arouse at this 
time the amount of enthusiasm that the reproduction of this 
sterling old favorite has occasioned. In the present revival the 
full strength of the splendid Tivoli cast will be utilized. It is 
worthy of note that the initial production of "Pinafore" in this 
city occurred at the Tivoli on July 3, 1879, and it ran for eighty 
consecutive nights, which, up to that time, was a theatrical 
record breaker. The story of 'Pinafore" is too well known to 
be given here, as it has become a comic opera classic, and the 
incident of the changed babies, together with their subsequent 
careers in different stations, which eventually they are com- 
pelled to change, has formed the basis for the plots of numer- 
ous stories and musical plays. 

The production will be one of the best ever given by the 
Tivoli, as no detail has been overlooked in reproducing the 
deck of the English warship, while the costuming is all that 
could be desired. 

• * * 

Pantages Theatre. — "A Night in Hawaii," a beautifully 
staged musical production with ten native Hawaiians in the 
act, is the stellar attraction on an entertaining bill of seven 
numbers at the Pantages, opening this Sunday afternoon. Chas. 
Alisky, the producer of the specialty, opened the Hawaiians 
in New York a few months ago, and the act was a signal suc- 
cess. The natives are splendid singers and dancers, one of 
the troupe, an alluring maiden from the Southern Seas, per- 
forming the sinuous "hula" native glide. Plump Bell Oliver, 
styled the "Tetrazzini of Ragtime," has been creating a small- 
sized riot with her rendition of catchy ballads. Miss Oliver is 
an effervescent comedienne. In contrast to Miss Oliver are 
Coogan and Cox, whose songs and dances, sprinkled with an 
abundance of daring fun, are the big comedy hit of the bill. 
One of the most startling demonstrations of the working of the 
"third degree" is exemplified in "The Police Inspector," a new, 
virile dramatic playlet by Clay M. Greene and Harrison Arm- 
strong. The Florenz Trio, a tumbling acrobatic act, appear in 
a special scenic setting called "Fun in a Restaurant." Zale- 
fredo, called the "Ysaye" of vaudeville, has a repertoire of 
classical melodies combined with the newest rags and modern 
selections. A duo of well known dancers are Hathaway and 
Mack, who will show the newest steps of the latest New York 
craze, "The Tango." 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



San Francisco Concert Season. — The honor and responsi- 
bility of opening the San Francisco concert season falls to 
Geraldine Farrar, the beautiful and accomplished soprano 
of the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, and the reigning 
sensation of the operatic world. Under the management of 
Charles A. Ellis, manager of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Miss Farrar will make a short concert tour, coming directly to 
San Francisco from Paris, and appearing at the Cort Theatre, 
San Francisco, Sunday afternoon, October 5th. Miss Farrar's 
only other California dates will be at the Macdonough Thea- 
tre, Oakland, Tuesday night, October 7th, and one appearance 
in Los Angeles, it being necessary for Miss Farrar to report at 
the Metropolitan Opera House immediately after her California 
concerts. 

* * * 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — The soloist engaged for the next 
Kohler & Chase Music Matinee, which will take place at Kohler 
& Chase Hall this afternoon, July 12th, is Miss Phyl- 
lida Ashley, pianist. This brilliant young artist is one of the 
genuine proteges of the Pacific Coast. She is a pupil of her 
mother, Mrs. Blanche Ashley, the distinguished piano peda- 
gogue and herself an artist of the first rank. She scored a great 
triumph as one of the soloists at the second annual convention 
of the music teachers of California, which took place in Los 
Angeles last year. Some of her compositions, played at the 
Berkeley High School recently, were greeted with much en- 
thusiasm and hearty endorsement. Miss Ashley's contributions 
to the excellent program arranged for Saturday will include : 
Chromatic Fantasie by Bach, and Waltz from Eugen Onegin 
by Tschaikowsky. 



BANKING 




ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL 
• BANK 



n * 



SAN FRANCISCO 


Paid-Ur Capital 


M.000,000 


Siirphu nnd UndmiUd Praflti 11,600,000 


Total Ri»oi)rcei 


140.000,000 


omens ; 


HERBERT TLE1SHHACKER F>rei<d«nt 


Sill GREENEBAUH Cha 


mini! i,r Hi.-. Boar*] 


WASHINGTON DODOE 


Vice-Preiidanl 


JOS. FRIEDliNDER 


Vic»-Pre*id«nt 


c. r. HUNT 


Yica-Praiident 


R. ALTSCHUL 


Caahiar 


C. R. PARKER 


Alliitint Cathiar 


Will. H. HIGH 


AsiUtaut Caihier 


H. CHOYNSK1 


Aiiiitaut Caihiar 


G. R. BURDICK 


Aaiiatnnt Caahiar 


A. L, LANGERMAM 


Secretary 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 



SIR EDMUND WALKER C.V.O.,LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Manager 

JOHN AIRD Assistant General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Aggregate Resource 



$15,000,000 

12,500,000 

246,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 



Alcazar Theatre. — The return of the locally popular little ac- 
tress, Bessie Barriscale, to the Alcazar Theatre next week, has 
given rise to much pleasant anticipation, which presages a 
notable event at the O'Farrell street playhouse. Assisting her 
is Howard Hickman, who happens also to be an old-time favor- 
ite, and supporting these two will be Belasco & Mayer's com- 
plete acting corps. The charming comedy, "Such a Little 
Queen," will be the medium of Miss Barriscale's reappearance. 
Just imagine a pretty and youthful queen of a small European 
principality being reduced to cooking her own meals in the 
kitchenette of a New York flat, and sharing her privations with 
her former prime minister. Then add to the picture the advent 
of the king of another European nation, who is likewise exiled. 

A young, well-bred New Yorker is introduced, who sympa- 
thizes with the exiled queen, and obtains employment for her- 
self, her prime minister and the king in the office of a wealthy 
pork-packer. After certain complications which result in both 
iosing their employment, the king and prime minister are found 
spending their nights on park benches, and the queen's ward- 
robe is reduced to one street dress and her coronation gown. To 
tell any more of the delightful comedy would not be fair. To 
see Miss Barriscale in the leading role and the rest of the cast 
in admirably adapted parts, will be distinctly worth while. 
There are four acts and some realistic staging. 



The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued In denominations of 



The management of Techau Tavern, which has been ac- 
customed to present attractive souvenirs to lady patrons, has 
added a most agreeable confection known as Trintini Breath 
Pastilles, made by V. Rigaud of Paris. The delicate perfume 
of these little tablets is sure to make them popular. Although 
the summer season is usually accompanied by a falling off in 
restaurant patronage, the Tavern is so favorably known to dis- 
criminating people that there is little, if any, diminution of the 
usual throngs. The Tavern is always cheerful, cool and com- 
fortable. 



Dr. Agnew. rectal 'lis. BuiMing. 4th ami Market streets. 



BYRON 


MAUZY 


Established 1884 


GOLD MEDAL PIANOS 


INNER PLAYER 


MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 


PIANOS 


SHEET MUSIC 


VICTOR VICTROLAS-GRAFONOLAS 


244-250 STOCKTON 


ST. UNION SQUARE 


Telephone Douglas 4355 


SAN FRANCISCO 



• 10, 



$20, 



$50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks «l Sao Francisco 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS ONLY 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 
RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1913 

Assets $ 55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 

Employees' Pension Fund 158,261.32 

N u m ber of Depositors 62, 1 34 

OFFICE HOURS: 10 o'clock A.M. to 3 o'clock P. M..ejtcept Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings [rom 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P.M. for receipt ol deposits only 



Telephone Kearny I461 Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agenls Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connections With All Railroads 

Main Office: 62S-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



RED CROSS WIPING RAGS 

AND 

COTTON WASTE 

for automobiles and engineers 
AUTOMOBILE OILS 

WEEKS- HOWE- EMERSON CO. 

51 MARKET STREET. S F 




20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



WORLD'S RECORDS BROKEN 




Walter Pomeroy, the Olympic Club's crack swimmer. 

Walter Pomeroy, of the Olympic Club, added to his reputa- 
tion as the best local long distance swimmer by setting a mark 
of 1 hour 56 minutes and 23 4-5 seconds for the swim across 
San Francisco Bay on Sunday last. Pomeroy is the holder of 
the record for swimming the Golden Gate, and Sunday's per- 
formance was the second time he had crossed the bay. 

The swim was held under the auspices of the South End Row- 
ing Club, and served to bring prominently to the front a young 
swimmer named Bobby Beck. In the race across the Golden 
Gate, held by the Olympic Club last summer, Beck was one 
of the competitors who finished, and that he has improved 
greatly in the meantime is shown by the fact that his time for 
the swim across the bay on Sunday was only 6 1-5 seconds 
slower than Pomeroy's. 

Duke Kahanamoku, the Hawaiian swimmer, added to his 
laurels during the past week when he broke a world's record 
in Sutro's Baths. The Hawaiian came here representing the 
Hui Nula Club of Honolulu to take part in the Pacific Coast 
championships, and it was in the 100 yards lace that he shat^ 
tered the mark made by C. M. Daniels, of New York, in Chi- 
cago, in 1910. 

Kahanamoku swam the distance in 54 3-5 seconds, cutting a 
fifth of a second off Daniels' mark. The performance of the 
Hawaiian swimmer, however, is enhanced by the fact that 
there was only one turn in the race at Sutro's, while Daniels 
had four turns in the tank in which he made his record. A 
swimmer has considerable advantage in the shove-off from the 
end of the tank at each turn. 

The record made in the 100 yards was the only world's 
mark set by Duke, but in every event in which he competed, he 
set new figures for the Pacific Coast. He won the 50 yard dash 
in 24 1-5 seconds and took the 220 yard swim in 2.29. In the 
quarter mile he cut ten seconds off the best previous Pacific 
Coast by finishing in 5 :41. 

What the Hawaiian would have done had he been in better 
condition it is hard to say, but there is no doubt that he was 
badly handicapped through the effects of an earache that at- 
tacked him a couple of days before the meet. It is said that the 
night before the meet he hardly slept at all, and that all the 
time he was suffering from the pain in his ear. 

Ludy Danger, of Redondo, set a new mark for the half-mile 
swim by making the distance in 12.17 4-5, just 3 1-5 seconds 
tetter than his own previous record. 



Guy de Villipoin, of the San Francisco Y. M. C. A., improved 
on his Coast record in the 50 yard breast stroke swim, by doing 

the distance in 36 1-5. 

* * * 

The defeat of Maurice McLoughlin, the San Francisco boy 
who is the acknowledged king of American tennis players, by 
Anthony F. Wilding, was quite a disappointment to followers 
of the game in the United States, and especially in this city, 
where McLoughlin learned the game. 

To those who know Wilding's record, however, the defeat of 
McLoughlin was not so surprising. Wilding has been the pre- 
mier player of the world for several years. He has not been so 
active on the courts this season, but he has practiced a good 
deal, and while McLoughlin was fighting his way through the 
tournament for the right to challenge the English champion, 
Wilding had plenty of opportunity to study the play of the 
young San Franciscan and spot the weak places in McLough- 
lin's game. 

That McLoughlin has weak spots is known to local players. 
His back hand is weak, and he has other faults that will be 
overcome with years and practice, and such a man as Wilding 
would undoubtedly notice these crevices in the armor and strike 
at them. Wilding was forced to two deuce sets before he de- 
feated the Native Son, but the fact that he did not lose a set 
clearly shows that he is still the premier player. The only 
excuse that could possibly be made for McLoughlin is that the 
hard work of going through a tournament in which the best 
players of all the tennis-playing nations of the world were 
entered may have taken the edge of his play, and left him with 
an impaired stock of energy. 

It is comforting to read the opinion of Wilding, who ought to 
be the best judge of a tennis player in the world, that the 
Americans figure to win the Davis Challenge Cup. Wilding 
says the Germans cannot stop the Americans, and he does not 
see how Great Britain, whose best men could not take a set 
from McLoughlin, can prevent the Americans from taking the 
cup away from the "tight little island." 

* * * 

The increasing interest in golf was shown on the Fourth of 
July holidays when every links in the neighborhood of this 
city and as far away as Del Monte, were busy from morning 
till night. Tournaments were held at Del Monte, Menlo, Clare- 
mont, Beresford, Presidio and San Rafael, and on the other 
links where no set events were scheduled, the number of play- 
ers was not affected by the absence of the members who played 
over the country courses. 

The "holes up" system of handicapping has apparently come 
to stay. It really is the best way to make an interesting match 
out of a contest between two players of different ability, and 

the results so far have been satisfactory. 

* * * 

The national all-round athletic championship of the United 
States will be held this Saturday in Los Angeles. Fred Thomp- 
son, of Los Angeles, is the most fancied of the dozen entrants, 
but he will have strenuous competition. Roy Mercer, the 
versatile athlete of the University of Pennsylvania, will be the 
principal Eastern contender, but the entry list contains the 
names of many good men who have won their spurs on this 
side of the continent. Fred Kelly, of the University of South- 
ern California; Eddie Beeson of the University of California; 
Errol Campbell and R. R. Templeton, of Stanford University; 
Charles S. Morris, of the Olympic Club; and William Hoenisch, 
of the Pastime Athletic Club, are athletes whose well known 
all round ability will make the contest an interesting one. 

* * * 

Rowing honors in the annual regatta held in connection with 
the Fourth of July celebration, went to the San Diego Rowing 
Club, who came north especially for the four-oared barge race. 
The southerners proved to be a good crew, with a clean-cut 
style, and they romped away from the crews of the bay clubs 
that opposed them. The San Diegans are anxious to have a 
try for the six-oared championship of the Pacific Ocean now 
held by the Alameda Boat Club, and as Hawaii is also anxious 
io compete, a triangle race may soon be arranged. 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



CROWN OF TAMALPA1S DEVASTATED. . 

This week a terrible forest fire rages in Marin County, and 
some of the most beautiful scenery in the State, at time of writ- 
ing, is in danger of- devastation. The beautiful crest of Mt. 
Tamalpais devastated, the flames have swept toward Mill 
Valley, Larkspur and Kentfield; four thousand anxious and 
heroic men stand guard fighting the flames as best they can, 
while residents flee with their worldly belongings. 

Although at the time of going to press the fire is increasing 
in violence, there is no certainty as to just the amount of 
damage that has been done, or will be done before the flames 
can be controlled. Many of the prettiest homes in this part of 
the State are menaced, and six thousand acres of magnificent 
timber have been laid to- waste. The temporary structures and 
cottages at Muir Woods have been burned to the ground, and 
the whole of San Francisco's most beautiful and best loved 
playground is in danger of complete devastation. 

According to what is said to be authoritative, the terrible 
disaster was started by a cigarette thrown from the open win- 
dow of a passing train. The act was noticed by Frank Briet- 
feld, marine observer stationed on the top of Mt. Tamalpais, 
who was making his way to the train on Monday morning. 
Lieutenant-Colonel George Bell, Jr., is in command of the 



iegular troops and "jackies" who are so valiantly striving to 
check the flames. 



The weather at Santa Cruz continues perfect, and the 

hundreds of surf bathers at the Beach are still enjoying them- 
selves, while the sands are daily covered with the bright-hued 
Japanese parasols of the loungers. The two dollar Sunday ex- 
cursions inaugurated by the Southern Pacific are being taken 
advantage of by thousands from San Francisco, who delight in 
the pleasures of the Santa Cruz beach, board walk and Casino. 
On Thursday evening last a complimentary ball was given to 
the six hundred regular soldiers who are encamped at Laveaga 
Park, and one for the sailors from the fleet anchored in the 
bay was given on Friday evening. On Monday evening next, 
the city will tender a ball in honor of both the naval and mili- 
tary officers. 



There is a chafing-dish period for every college girl; 

but when f^ie time comes for the promotion to the higher posi- 
tion hard by a grand square cooking stove, most of the gradu- 
ates prefer to toot the alarm-whistle on a limousine. — Dallas 
News. 



90LAN0 
IRRIGATED 

FARMS 

40 Miles— 2 Hours from San Francisco 

SPECIAL PLANTING OFFER: We will lease 
your land for 5 years, plant it to alfalfa, farm it, 
AND GIVE YOU ONE-THIRD OF THE WHOLE 
CROP EVERY YEAR. 

Over $600,000 sales first two weeks. 

Best land $175 to $300 an acre, 10 u w or 20% down 
balance easy payments, 6 years' time. SEE THE 
SOLANO IRRIGATED FARMS. ALL OFFICES 
OPEN EVENINGS. 

A. J. RICH & CO. 

General Sales Agents Chronicle Bldg. San Francisco 

Phone Sutter 51S1 

BRANCH SALES OFFICES 
Oakland— IOJo Broadway Demonstration — S28 Market 

Italian— 62(i Montgomery Foreign Dept. — 2H" Mission St. 

Suisun— Opposite S. P. Depot Solano Office on Property 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 






8,500. acres located in the rich lowlands where the average 
yield is the highest in the United States. 



UnNANOAy 



Although depressing influences 
New York were prominent on the New York 

Financial News. Stock Exchange this week, there are 

decided evidences of strengthening 
at time of writing. There was a slight downward drift on 
Monday and Tuesday, but it was not particularly appreciable. 

Bear traders received encouragement from the fact that there 
was a further engagement of $2,000,000 more gold for export to 
Paris. The lower quotations sent from London were more or 
less responsible for any unsteadiness there was on the New 
York market. 

The lack of demand for stocks was the more noticeable by 
reasoa of the fact that a considerable volume of investment 
buying is looked for at this season of the year following the 
heavy July interest and dividend payments. 

The July investment demand up to the present has been light 
compared to that of former years. This lightness of demand is 
particularly noticeable in the bond market, which, generally 
speaking, is irregular, with a certain lower trend. 

According to advices received by the J. C. Wilson Company, 
the market this weak is featureless, and apparently belongs 
entirely to the traders, with chances of its remaining so for the 
time being. 



State Banks. 
Show Gains. 



The financial condition in California 
seems to be encouraging, if the re- 
ports from the State banks can be 
taken as a satisfactory barometer. 

The figures from 548 State banks in California, which were 
completed early this week, show that there have been made de- 
cided gains in resources, surplus, undivided profits and de- 
posits, over a corresponding period in 1912. The grand total 
of individual deposits in 1913 was $561,921,594.36, as against 
$522,945,976.82 for 1912. State and municipal deposits in 1913 
were $19,031,911.31, and in 1912 they were $13,523,430.65. 

The gain in combined deposits was $44,484,398.20. The gain 
in combined resources was $30,964,722.53. The gain in com- 
bined surplus was $1,592,340.74. The gain in combined un- 
divided profits was $390,093.28. 

Total combined cash on hand June 4, 1913, was $26,934,- 
808.68, as compared with $24,199,035.45 on hand June 14, 1912. 
The total value of bank prernises was increased from $23,907,- 
717.86 in 1912 to $26,453,748.66 in 1913. The grand total of 
capital stock in 1913 is $62,668,893.96, an increase of about 
$2,000,000 over 1912. 

The 36 State banks and branches in San Francisco show a 
gain in individual deposits of $6,300,707.30 in the year. The 
38 banks and branches in Los Angeles show a gain of $7,308,- 
617.10. The 18 banks and branches in Oakland show a gain of 
$2,949,245.92. The 11 banks of Sacramento gained $2,306,- 
767.22. The seven banks of San Diego gained $1,393,126.49. 
The six banks of Stockton gained $652,807.53. The 432 banks 
of the remainder of the State gained $8,058,645.70. 



Reports received in the financial 
Increased Sugar Yield, district indicate that the sugar beet 
yield is going to be heavier this 
year than last by 15 to 25 per cent. Orange County factories 
will cut no less than 290,000 tons of this product, and farmers 
will receive $1,750,000 or more for the season's output. 

The Santa Ana Co-operative Sugar Company and-the South- 
ern California Company, will begin their campaigns about the 
middle of August. The Santa Ana Co-operative field men re- 
port all that factory's acreage in good condition. The factory 
will cut beets from between 10,000 and 13,000 acres this year, 
about double last year's acreage. 

The Southern California Sugar Company finds the fields 
contracted with it in good condition, and prospects for heavy 
yields are encouraging. This plant has a large share of its 



The Railroad. Commission has 
R. R. Commission Notes, granted authority to the Southern 
California Edison Company to issue 
30,000 shares of its common stock. The company will offer 
10,000 shares to its own stockholders and a syndicate is being 
formed to underwrite the remaining 20,000 shares. The order 
of the Commission provides that the stock shall be sold for 
not less than $80 per share. 

The Commission has granted leave to the Beaumont Gas 
& Power Company to issue a mortgage note in the sum of 
$5,000 for the purpose of paying off existing indebtedness. 

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company has applied to the 
Commission for authority to refund short term notes in the 
sum of $569,000. 



Wedding Presents.— The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



W. L. GROWALL CO. 

— TAILORS — 

Announce the addition to their tailoring business in the 
Mutual Savings Bank Building a Custom Shirtmaking De- 
partment on the second floor, one floor below their tailoring 
business. 

MR. HOWARD BLACK 

for a great many years the leading shirt maker of San Fran- 
cisco, is associated and In charge of this department. 

The shirting line will consist of the highest grade import- 
ed materials of exclusive designs at satisfactory prices. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



New York Slock Eicaeaie 

Now York Cotloa Excasaie 

Caiceie Boird of Trede 

The Slock eel Boad Eicaeaie, See Freadeee 



Moil Office 

HILLS BUILDING 

Sob Freicuco. ClLiforoil 



Breach Offleoa 

Lee Aafelee Sea Diefe 
Coroaedo Beech Portlaad. Ore. 

Seetlle. Welti Veoeoe.tr. B. C. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Established ilst 

SUTRO &. CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Regard to Any Security 
"Will be FurnUhed Upon Request 

M«rr,ttri— Tht San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 

Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and inspect motors. 

Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



pni ICUrC 623 Sacramento Street, between 
DnUOrl LO Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

t.o order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets, Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning PowderB. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY. 
Let us guide you In your selections. 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers In 
The Highest Class PAPF R For 0mce statloner y 

Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco, Cal. 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



23 







BY BURLEIGH DAVISON. 

The Panama-Pacific Road Race 

After months of preparation, the Panama-Pacific road race 
between Los Angeles and Sacramento was run on the "Fourth," 
bringing to a close the biggest automobile event ever held out 
West, and one of the most important ever held in this country. 

The grinding run up from the Southern city, through the San 
Joaquin Valley for 455 miles, was one of the severest tests that 
a motor car could be put to, and the fact that so many cars 
finished in such condition and so closely together, shows how 
game were the racers, and what splendid machines they piloted 
into the State capital. 

Frank Verbeck and Harry Ham, in their Fiat, were the first 
to cross the tape at the State Fair Grounds, and thus win- 
ning the race; in addition, they established a new record be- 
tween Los Angeles and Sacramento, making the wonderful 
time of 11 hours 1 minute and 16 seconds, demonstrating the 
tremendous power and consistent speed of their machine. 

Following close at the heels of the big Italian Fiat in point 
of time, E. S. Waterman and Cliff Ord Perry, in a Buick stock 
car, arrived at the mark in the remarkable time of 11:21:25, 
a record that any car might be proud of. 

The Fiat seemed destined to carry off mo?t of the honors of 
the day, as the third car to finish was one of that make driven 
by Barney Oldfield, the famous track driver, whose time from 
Los Angeles was 11 :22:53. 

Contrary to the generally expressed belief, there were no 
fatalities to mar the pleasure of the day's racing, and though 
there were a number of narrow escapes, the drivers managed 
to come through without any serious damage either to them- 
selves or their cars. 

For the first racers to arrive in Sacramento, the finish was 
spectacular in the extreme. Great crowds of motor car enthu- 
siasts from all over the State were on hand to see the termina- 
tion of the big event. From San Francisco many spectators 
and dealers went up to the capital, and were on hand to cheer 
the drivers as they came up out of the sun-scorched valley of 
the South. 

Several minor accidents occurred along the road, the most 
important of which took place in the vicinity of Fresno, where 
Harris Hanshue, driving an Apperson, went into the ditch 
about ten miles north of Fresno, and was forced to change a 
tire of his car. In some way the report got out that he was 
killed, and this rumor floated about so persistently that the 
automobile officials hurried to Herndon to bring in the remains 
of the driver. That he was on his way, safe and sound, did not 
become known for some time later on. 

The mechanician of car No. 5, a Simplex, was thrown out 
of his machine about three blocks north of the Fresno con- 
trol, when the car blew a tire. He was only slightly hurt. A 
Knox went into the ditch in this vicinity, but no one was in- 
jured, and the car did not lose much time. 

On the whole, the race was one of the most successful ever 
held in this country, and demonstrates that this State is an 
ideal one for staging big events of this kind. To think that 
nineteen cars could make this 455 mile run over all kinds of 
country roads, in the remarkable time recorded, will be one 
of the biggest advertisements that the State could have, and 
one that will show the world what fine highways there are in 
California. 

Averaging close to forty miles per hour, over hills and 
through valleys, the racing cars showed what the modern auto- 
mobile can do when put to the test, and it further shows that 
for pluck and perseverance the Western driver is fully up to 
the highest standards set by his Eastern and foreign rival. 

The running time of the first four cars to enter the State 
Fair Grounds at Sacramento were as follows : No. 9, Fiat, Ver- 
beck, 11:01:10; No. 1, Cadillac, Soules. 11:20:16: No. 7, Fiat. 



Oldfield, 11:22:53; No. 5, Simplex, Toft, 11:39:39. Faulkner, 
driving car No. 2. a Simplex, was the fifth car to enter the 
park, and his time was 12:03:50 from Los Angeles to Sacra- 
mento. T. J. Beaudet, driving a Cadillac, whose number was 
8, was the sixth to cross the tape, making the run from the 
Southern city in 11:57:31. 

The first ten cars to finish in the money follow : First — Fiat, 
No. 9, S. Verbeck and H. Ham. Second— Buick, No. 45, E. S. 
Waterman. Third— Fiat, No. 7, Barney Oldfield. Fourth- 
Cadillac, No. 1, C. Soules. Fifth— Alco, No. 30, Ralph Chand- 
ler. Sixth— Pope-Hartford, No. 48, Ralph R. Skinner and J. 
Fleming. Seventh — National, No. 34, C. Putman and W. Bar- 
croft. Eighth— Simplex, No. 3. Omar Toft. Ninth— Apperson, 
No. 33, Hanshue and Herrick. Tenth — Cadillac, No. 8, Beau- 
det. No written protest has been filed against the referee's 
listing. 

Vandals at Work In the San Joaquin Valley 

Malicious vandals are at work in the San Joaquin Valley de- 
stroying the handsome new direction signs thai at various points 
serve to tell the traveler the distances between places and the 
the direction to take. These signs, which are useful, not only 



F-l-A-T 

STRIPPED TOURING CAR 

WINS 



Two Fiat Entrants in Los Angeles-Sacramento 
Road Race Win 

1st and 3d Places 

Defeating More Than Two-Score Competitors. 
443.6 Miles— 11 Hours, 1 Minute, 16 Seconds 



Winner was a Stripped Shaft Drive Touring Car, used as 
the personal car of the entrant, E. E. Hewlett of Los An- 
geles, and driven by Mr. Hewlett's driver, Frank Verbeck. 



The FIAT Had No 
Mechanical Trouble 



and did not have to make a single tire change— two facts 
that speak volumes for the construction and design of 
the car. 



FIAT MOTOR SALES CO. 

Phone Frankim 7147 Van Ness Ave. and Jackson St. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



to automobilists, but to every one who uses the roads, whether 
riding or afoot, cost considerable to make and put in place, 
and as no one gains anything by destroying them, it is incon- 
ceivable why they should arouse the ire of the mean-spirited 
individuals who have shot at them with guns, battered them 
with stones, and in other ways defaced them. 

If the present law is inadequate to detect and punish this 
class of offenders, it should be so amended so that the un- 
principled wretches who do this kind of petty meanness can 
be dealt with. No penalty short of a prison term is drastic 
enough to teach people of this calibre to observe the rules and 
orders of organized society, and the neighborhoods where 
these acts of vandalism have occurred should do all in their 
power to aid the officials in running the miscreants to the 

ground. 

* * * 

Monlhan Joins Cole Forces 

President J. J. Cole, of the Cole Motor Car Company, an- 
nounces that John Guy Monihan, of the Premier Motor Manu- 
facturing Company, has become assistant director of sales and 
advertising of the Cole Company. In securing Mr. Monihan 
for his company, Mr. Cole believes that he has strengthened 
the organization of his already efficient sales and advertising 
organization, and with such men as Homer McKee, Field Sales 
Manager Ed. F. Harris, Secretary and Treasurer J. F. Morrison, 
Factory Production Manager J. F. Richman, and Advertising 
Manager H. C. Bradfield, the Cole Motor Car Company is in 
a position to enter into its new career with every line of en- 
deavor covered. 

• • • 

Goodyear Announces New Tire 

L. C. Rockhill, manager of the Automobile tire department 
of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company of Akron, Ohio, 
announces a new tire for electric cars, which will be known as 
the Goodyear Power-Saver Pneumatic Tire. This will be the 
Goodyear contribution to the electric motor car industry for 
1914. "Resiliency and durability," said Rockhill, "are the two 
fundamental qualities necessary to incorporate in a tire to 



REPUBLIC 

StAqGaRdTREAD 

" THE TIRE PERFECT " 




REPUBLIC 

295 



RUBBER CO. OF CAL. 

Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco 



l =B 



J 



K K 

K 
K 
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KISSEL CAR 

Continues Winner 

In every test, whether it be speed, endurance, 
economy or efficiency, The Kissel Kar has always 
won honors, and the best endorsement of the 
Kissel performance in daily service is a large 
list of satisfied owners :: :: :: :: :: 

1914 Kissel Kar "40" $1,850 f. o. b. factory 
1914 Kissel 6-60, - $3,150 f. o. b. factory 

On Exhibition at Our Salesrooms 

Pacific Kissel Kar Branch 



(Successors to Standard Motor Car Co.) 



GOLDEN GATE AND VAN NESS AVENUES 
San Francisco 



K 



K K K K 



K 



12TH AND MADISON STREETS 
Oakland 

KKKKKKKKK 



K 

K 
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July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



make it the ideal for electrics. The tire must not be made so 
resilient for the purpose of saving power that it will not wear 
for a reasonable mileage, and on the other hand, durability 
cannot be accomplished at too great an expense of resiliency. 
There are few people who realize the difference between tires 
built for gasoline cars and those built for electrics, and the 
difference in care and treatment that the electric tire calls for." 
The new Goodyear Power-Saver Pneumatic Tire, it is be- 
lieved, will solve the electric car tire problem in a satisfactory 

way. 

» * * 

Jeffery Tests Severe 

The severe tests that all the parts that go into a Rambler 
Cross Country Car are subjected to is illustrated by the recent 
experiment made at the factory on one of the drop-forged axles 
of a Cross Country car. Thirty-two thousand pounds- — sixteen 
tons' pressure — in the form of a tremendous twist, was applied, 
forcing the axle around twice without breaking, truly a re- 
markable test in every respect. 

L. H. Bill, assistant general manager of the Jeffery factory, 
said: "Forged from carefully selected alloy steel, the Cross 
Country axle contains just the right amount of toughening 
material. It is built to withstand the constant jar, pounding 
and vibration that might cause an ordinary piece of steel to 
become brittle and snap." 

Stearns Leaves for Europe 

Just prior to his departure for an extended trip to Europe, 
Frank B. Stearns, president of the F. B. Stearns Company, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, manufacturers of the Stearns-Knight cars, 
predicted a good business outlook for the next twelve months, 
and said that from all indications, conditions all over the coun- 
try warrant the belief that the automobile business will be 
even better than that of 1913. Stearns bases his forecast upon 
detailed reports received from all Stearns branches, agencies 
and dealers all over the country, and says that the concensus 
of opinion was that the next year's business in the motor car 
would be well above the average. 

* * =:= 

Club Holds Economy Run 

A combination driving contest and gasoline economy test 
was pulled off by the Automobile Club of Springfield, Mass., 
recently which attracted the attention of motorists far and 
near by it's results. 

The method of comparison was determined by the gasoline 
consumption per thousand pounds of car weight, including pas- 
sengers, thus giving the members of the club an accurate means 
of judging the relative merits of their cars as regards economi- 
cal running regardless of size. In the above test the best show- 
ing was made by a six-cylinder Franklin air-cooled car, which 
made 108 miles on a gallon of gasoline per thousand pounds of 
car weight. A six-cylinder water-cooled Knox ran a close sec- 
ond by making 106 miles to the gallon of gasoline per thou- 
sand pounds of car weight. The performance of the latter car 
created considerable comment, as it has heretofore generally 
been thought that a six-cylinder car is not as efficient as a four- 
cylinder machine in this respect. 

* * * 

Leavltt Returns from Vacation In Sonoma 

Declaring that after all the cool breezes of the bay section 
felt pretty good after spending some days in the Sonoma Val- 
ley, J. W. Leavitt, head of J. W. Leavitt & Co., and A. D. 
Plughoff of the same concern returned to San Francisco this 
week. Leavitt was full of enthusiasm over his trip, and said 
that the Cloverdale country was one of the prettiest spots in 
the State. "It is surprising," said he, "how few people take 
the drive to the geysers at Geyserville. This trip is one that 
would reward any one well for the trouble. In fact, it is a 
miniature Yellowstone Park up there, with some of the most 
beautiful scenery imaginable." Leavitt will return to Clover- 
dale and have another try at an outing. 

• * • 

1914 Wlnton "Six" Seventh Year Model 

The 1914 Winton "Six" has just been announced, and the 
automobiling world is awaiting with great interest the appear- 
ance of this, the seventh model of the pioneer of "sixes." 

The splendid records made by Winton "sixes" ever since 



they were first put on the market has convinced the factory that 
it has a machine that embodies the most essential mechanical 
features of the modern motor car. 

The 1914 Winton 'six" has the popular left-hand drive and 
center control, and is built much nearer the ground than for- 
mer models. The radius rods have been discarded, the rear 
springs serving in that capacity. Several other mechanical 
features have been added that tend to make the new cars much 
more powerful and easy riding. The lines of the new models 
are long and graceful, like those of a yacht, with no striving 
after odd or freakish effects that mar some makes of motor 
cars. 

* * # 

Oakland Car Makes Hit In England 

A London automobile writer in a recent number of "Sporting 
Life," describes a trip made in an Oakland Sixty-Six in lan- 
guage that is as unique as it is refreshing," says Arthur Bun- 
ker, manager of the Oakland Motor Company, of this city, and 
he quoted the following samples : 

"My run on an Oakland confirmed two impressions almost to 
the degree of making them convictions, these two being : First, 
that there is no more agreeable fellow than your educated, trav- 
eled Scotchman; and second, that when the American invasion 
really does set in, when we begin to get among us a half dozen 
of the really high-grade American chassis, British and Euro- 
pean manufacturers will have to keep their fingers and thumbs 
free of hangnails to do business. 

"The six-cylinder Oakland is the first American gentle- 
woman it has been my privilege to meet in the car line. She 
comes from Pontiac, Michigan, and resides temporarily at 169 
Shaftesbury Ave., W. C, 'temporarily,' because she doesn't get 
much chance to stay in the showrooms very long. Her engine 
is cast in pairs of cylinders measuring 103 by 120 mm. or ^^x 
4 3 4 in.), so that her inland revenue rating is 39.6 which cause 
her owners to be mulcted in an eight-guinea tax. 

"Mr. Coffield picked me up at the club, and as it was bitterly 
cold, and I had no mitts, he drove the car down to my home, 
where I put on a wedding garment or two, and took charge, hav- 
ing assured myself that Jack was assured against everything 
but tickling. Under my cicerone's directions, I got aboard, 
looked at the arrangement of the gate, and felt down for the 
starting button. Pressing this, I gave the clutch pedal a manful 
push, and the engine was running. Thanks let me exclaim to 
the Delco combination of starting, igniting and lighting system. 

The writer goes on to describe the run, which in many re- 
spects is a revelation to him, but in reality is simply the story 
of the every-day work of the Oakland in many lands and under 

all kinds or road conditions." 

* * * 

Baker Victoria Makes Trip to San Francisco 

Making a long-distance trip in an electric is not, as a rule, 
considered quite the proper way to tour between cities, but 
according to C. A. Lamus, of Sacramento, who recently drove 
lrom Sacramento to Oakland in his Baker Electric Victoria, 
drivers of electric cars will have no difficulty in making this 
tour. 

Leaving Sacramento early in the morning, after a run of 
two and one-half hours, Lamus arrived in Stockton, where he 
put the car on charge. From Stockton the run to Livermore 
via Tracy, Altamont, was made; the grades approaching 
Livermore were taken with ease. At Livermore the car was 
again put on charge, and after an interesting ride through the 
Dublin Canyon, the spin along the Haywards Boulevard 
brought him into Oakland. Lamus said his car arrived clean 
and in order, just as if it had been driven over paved streets 

all the way. 

* * « 

McFarland Returns from Stockton 

After unloading a carload of Mitchells for the residents of 
Stockton, O. C. McFarland, of the Osen-McFarland Company 
of this city, returned this week well satisfied with his trip. The 
cars were for customers who have been awaiting deliveries up 
in the San Joaquin city, and who were anxious to get their 
machines. 

"While in Stockton, I met R. L. Rigdon in his 1913 Mitchell 
en route to Lake Tahoe," said McFarland, "and in spite of the 
fact that his car was loaded down with baggage, he was making 
his sixteen miles to the gallon of gasoline." 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



The following detailed itinerary is Bulletin 5 of the Indiana Automobile Manufacturers Association Tour to the Pacific Coast. 

Official Address Pass Through 

Miles (See Foot Note) (Lunch Stop in Capitals) 

71.7 Terre Haute House Brazil. 

150.0 Leland House Paris, Chrisman, Tuscola, 

DECATUR 1 :30. 

117.7 Planters Hotel Carlinville, ALTON 11 :30. 

136.0 City Hall Warrenton, Fulton. 

158.9 Hotel Baltimore Boonville, Marshall. 



July Leave Time Arrive Time 

1 Indianapolis, Ind. . .2:00 pm Terre Haute 6:00 pm 

2 Terre Haute 7 :30 am Springfield .4 :30 pm 

3 Springfield, 111 7:30 am St. Louis 2:30 pm 

4 St. Louis, Mo 7:30 am Columbia, Mo 3:00 pm 

5 Columbia 7 :30 am Kansas City 5 :00 pm 

6 In Kansas City 

7 Kansas City 7:00 am Fort Riley, Kan 6:00 pm 

8 Fort Riley, Kan 7:00 am Ellis 4:00 pm 



9 Ellis 7 :00 am 

10 Burlington, Col 7 :00 am 

11 Colorado Springs. . .2:00 pm 

12 In Denver. 

13 Denver 10:30 am 

14 Hot Sulphw Sp'ngs 8:00 am 



15 Glenwood Springs . . 7 

16 Grand Junction 7 

17 Green River, Utah. .6 

18 In Salt Lake City. 

19 Salt Lake City.... 10 

20 Salt Lake City 7 

21 Kearney's Ranch.... 7 

22 Ely, Nev 7 

23 Austin 6 

24 Reno . . . - 8 

25 LakeTahoe, Cal....8 

26 Sacramento 7 

27 Oakland 1 

28-29 In San Francisco. 
30 San Francisco 7 



Burlington 4:30 pm 

Colorado Springs ... .5:00 pm 
Denver 4:30 pm 

Hot Sulphur Springs. 6:00 pm 
Glenwood Springs ... 3 :00 pm 

Grand Junction 1 :00 pm 

Green River, Utah.. 5:00 pm 
Salt Lake City 6:00 pm 

Ogden 12:30 pm 

Kearney's Ranch ....4:30 pm 

Ely, Nev 2 :00 pm 

Austin 5 :00 pm 

Reno 5 :00 pm 

Lake Tahoe 2 :00 pm 

Sacramento 2:30 pm 

Oakland 3 :30 pm 

San Francisco 2 :30 pm 



30 am Del Monte 4 :30 pm 



:30 


am 


:00 


am 


:00 


am 


:30 


am 


:30 


am 


:30 


am 


:30 


am 


:00 


am 


:00 


am 


:00 


am 


:30 


am 


30 


pm 



31 Del Monte 7:30 am San Luis Obispo. . . .4:00 pm 

Aug. 

1 San Luis Obispo. . .8:30 am Santa Barbara 2:00 pm 

2 Santa Barbara 7 :30 am Los Angeles 12 :00 m 



156.6 Fort Riley TOPEKA 11 :00. 

Manhattan. 

177.8 Care Postmaster Abilene. Salina, 

ELLSWORTH 11:30, 
Hays. 

169.8 Care Postmaster Colby, Goodland. 

165.9 Hotel Antler LIMON 11 :00. 

69.2 Brown Palace Hotel... 

89.8 Care Postmaster IDAHO SPRINGS 12:30. 

104.2 Hotel Colorado Walcott, STATE 

BRIDGE 11 :00. 

104.5 City Hall 

154.0 City Hall , Mack. 

203.2 Hotel Utah Price, Provo City. 

37.2 Detour to Ogden and Return. 

146.8 No Postoffice 

124.3 Care Postmaster 

147.3 City Hall EUREKA 11 :30. 

183.5 Riverside House FALLON 12 :00. 

72.0 Tahoe Tavern Carson City. 

143.0 Hotel Sacramento 

130.7 Hotel Oakland STOCKTON 10:00. 

6.0 St. Francis Hotel 

150.0 Hotel Del Monte SAN JOSE 10:30, 

Santa Cruz, Salinas. 

149.9 Hotel Andrews Salinas, PASO ROBLES 

1:00. 

119.6 Hotel Potter 

105.8 Hotel Alexandria 



6 Los Angeles 10:00 am Indianapolis 2:15 pm 2453.1 Grand Canyon. 

(Aug. 10) 

(NOTE — Send all mail or telegrams care Indiana Tour. Where no hotel address is given, send mail care Postmaster and 
telegrams care Telegraph office.) W. McK. WHITE, Tour Chairman. 



Firestone Tires are Winners 

All over the country the racing this "Fourth" has been of 
such a character that the best there was in the cars, drivers and 
equipment has been brought to the front. Automobiles that 
entered in any of the big races this year had to be in the pink 
of condition to make any showing at all. This held good to 
tires as well as to automobiles, and the results of the big In- 
dianapolis meet, the Tacoma Speedway Races, and the Panama- 
Pacific Road Races, demonstrated that it was again a case of 
the survival of the fittest. 

In the Indianapolis races, the first and second winning cars 
were shod with stock Firestone tires. At Tacoma, in the 200 
mile free-for-all, and in the 250 mile race, Earl Cooper, in the 
Stutz, equipped with Firestone tires, carried off the honors, 
and in the Panama-Pacific Road race between Los Angeles and 
Sacramento, the first, second and third winning cars all were 
equipped with Firestone tires. 

A feature of the latter race that makes the above showing all 
the more remarkable, was the fact that the winner, Verbeck, in 
his Fiat, used the original tires that his car started with from 
Los Angeles, as his extra tires, which were carried on the rear 
of his car, were lost somewhere between the two terminals of 
the route. 

The adaptability of the Firestone tire to all kinds of roads is 
brought out clearly, as the above races were held on widely 
different kinds of roads. The Indianapolis races were held on 
cement and brick tracks. The Tacoma course was over a dirt 



track, and the Panama-Pacific Road race was run over roads of 
all kinds, and in every condition, thus proving that the Fire- 
stone is ready to deliver the goods under all conditions encoun- 
tered in motor car driving. 

* * * 

Knox-Martin Tractors Perform Wonders 

Owing to the unusual record for consistent hard work and 
feats in heavy haulage that the Knox-Martin tractors have es- 
tablished, they are now being designated as the "Iron Horse" of 
commerce. 

"Hauling a 50,000 pound load of flour is one of the feats of 
this tractor that caused old draymen to sit up and take notice. 
Loaded with eight and one-half tons of lumber, another Knox- 
Martin negotiated a hill with a twenty per cent grade, and did 
not have any trouble either. 

"Over rough roads, pulling 30,000 pounds of crushed rock, 
did not in the least cause the driver of one of these tractors to 
get uneasy, for he knew that his machine was prepared for just 
this kind of work, and could do it six days in the week without 
bucking or breaking down. 

"House moving," said Samuel Crim, head of the Reliance 
Automobile Company, distributors for the Knox-Martin trac- 
tors, "is the latest moving proposition that these machines have 
essayed, and pulling a house weighing some fifty tons proved 
the mettle of the machine, as the tractor carried in addition 
six tons of crushed rock as ballast, and the feat looms up as one 
of the biggest accomplishments in tractor work ever done." 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



Overland Car Driven to Susanville 

C. R. Wilcox, in an Overland car, has just made the trip 
overland to Susanville. The 408 mile road trip was made in 
about 48 hours. The route from Oakland to Reno was taken, 
and from there led north along Honey Lake, on the California, 
Nevada and Oregon road. J. W. Leavitt, head of J. W. Leavitt 
& Company of San Francisco, received the following letter 
from Wilcox : 

"In my Overland car I have just made the trip from Oakland 
to Susanville. We left Oakland May 29th at 2 p. m., and made 
the run to Susanville, 408 miles, in about 48 hours, arriving 
there Saturday afternoon. 

"From Oakland we drove the car to Sacramento, and from 
there to Colfax via Roseville and Auburn. The roads along 
this stretch were good. After Colfax, the road led through 
Magra, Dutch Flat and to Blue Canyon, where we stopped to 
admire the scenery and take pictures. We repeated this per- 
formance at Crystal Lake, between Cisco and the Summit. 

"Just over the Summit we passed through two feet of snow 
for a distance of 100 feet or more. At the same place the 
road was very steep and rocky for about one-half of a mile. 
Aside from this spot the roads all the way into Reno were in 
exceptionally good condition for this time of year. 

"From Reno we journeyed north to Amedee, and along the 
borders of Honey Lake to Hot Springs. We passed through 
Dewitt, Standish and Johnsonville, and thence to Susanville. 

"The road from the Summit led us down a long, winding 
grade, the roadbed of which is good, until we reached the Don- 
ner Memorial Cross, which stands on the right. This cross 
•was erected in memory of the ill-fated Donner party, who lost 
their lives in a blinding snow-storm way back in 1849. 

"When we started, the car had not been run over 54 miles, 
and aside from occasional stops for oil and gasoline, we made 
the entire journey without difficulty or motor trouble. We 
reached an elevation of 5,400 feet and plowed through snow 
and through a few bad places, but the car behaved as well as 



one that had been driven 5,000 miles. The way the little car 
took us up steep grades and lots of them pleased me very 
much." 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 1865 

Announces the removal ol their Offices and Factory to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sts. 
Phone Prospect 30 

Where their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery of 
the best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearinsre with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All sizes carried in stock 




Pacific Coast Distributors 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 



Sid Francisco Frtsno 



Lot Angilts Portland Seattle Spokane 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
» m r-r-« t- x t If you want to reduce your oil 

MoloKoL —• 

Use MoToRoL 
''It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

830 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich XL Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

. There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-847 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THB 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coast Ascot* 
630 Van Ness Avenue Ssn Francisco 
CALL AND SIE DEMONSTRATION 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Fall factory agulpmant on ail Pack- 

"urt/-mcDii arda. Oldsmobllas. Colas. Thomas and 

HUUVbK Savin othars. Absolutsly pcrfact. 

Full sot of four— $t4 to Sil. Undar 

At IV II IADV SPRIlMr, Rr compression by baavy loads, rourh 

AUAILIAK1 arKUNO OC t0 .da or bumps. Undar all conditions 

rldas as aasy as on asphalt. Impos. 
SHOCK ABSORBER slbla to braak sprints. No compatltlon 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
6t? Turk St.. San Francisco 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. A B. I. BILL. 

f^L T T 643 Golden Gate Ave. 
^^ ■*■ •'-' San Francisco. Cal. 


Machinists and Eantasors 

I'CCMAM DD /~i C Automobile Repairing a Specialty 
IxEIirNAlN Dl\L/«J. JJ# G oldan Gats Avaaua. bat. Hyda 

and Lai kin Strasts 
Pbaaas: Franklin Ua, Homo J aois 


_ AMERICAN THERMOS BOTTLE 

THERMOS company 

Tharmos Building. Naw York City 
BOTTLES, CARAFES ' ni 

MOGENSON WELLS CO. 

And LUNCH KITS Pbalan Bide.. San Fraaclaco 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



v efcTi*i5s 




"JSMILE AT MILES" 



Regular Clincher- 
Quick Detachable — 
And Straight Side 

IN 
Plain, Wrapped or f»D F A FiC 
Zig-Zag Anti-Skid 1 iVEy/YL/O 



ASK US OR ANY LEE DEALER 

Pacific Coist Distributor* 

Cbanslor^Lyon Company 



Lot Angeles 
Spokane 



Portland 
Sao Francisco 



Seattle 

Fresno 



TRADE 



In Choosing A 
NECESSITY Insist 
Upon The BEST 



MARK 




REG. U.S. PAT. OFF 
"THE ORIGINAL AND BEST ASBESTOS BRAKE LINING" 

Is the Standard Brake 
Lining of the Industry. 

It Makes Brakes GRIP. 
It Insures Your Safety. 

RAYBESTOS is the original heat 
proof facing. Made of long fibre 
asbestos, specially treated. The 
name RAYBESTOS is stamped on 
every foot for your protection. 

W'- ;iU<> make iiuH"* and 
Raymond Brakt-s and Gy- 
rex the Mixer. 




THE ROYAL EQUIPMENT 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



CO. 



CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 



San Francisco 
Spokane 



Los Angeles 
Seattle 



Fresno 
Portland 




HARRIS 

TflAOEjMARK REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

OILS 



Lubrication not Imitation 



Is What You Get in Every Can of HARRIS OILS 



No injurious ingredients are added to HARRIS OILS. Every drop is real 
oil with Highest Quality Pennsylvannia Crude Stock as a basis. The 
soot-deposit forming ingredients are eliminated to the greatest possible 
extent. Highest engine efficiency is what you get when you use 
HARRIS OILS. Ask your dealer. 

A. W. HARRIS OIL CO. 

326 S. Water St., Providence, R. I. 148 No. Wabash Ave., Chicago, I1L 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 



Los Angeles 



San Francisco 



Seattle 



Spokane 



Fresno 



Portland 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 



FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Commercial Trucks 
A Specialty 



Automobile 
Supplies 



The attention of owners of pleasure cars living in San Mateo 
County is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



STORE YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

Convenient to All Downtown 
HOTELS - CLUBS - THEATRES 



COLUMBIA GARAGE 



655 GEARY ST., near Jones. 



Phone Franklin 544 



Day and Night Washing and Storage— Supplies— Tires 
■Machine Shop— Vulcanizing— Electrics 



BETTS 

CRESCENT GRADE 

AUTOMOBILE SPRINGS 

Guaranteed against break 
age or settling tor 
one year 



Phone 
Kearny 2472 




Manufactured by 

BETTS SPRING CO. 

888-890 Folsom St. 



Sao Fraoeisc*. Cal. 



Copyright 1912 Betts Spring Co. 



Fireproof garage and 
machine shop fully 
equipped. More work 



FOR SALE! 

than can be taken care of. Large list of satisfied cus- 
tomers. A fine paying proposition. Elegantly located 
near San Francisco. Must sell. 

Box 100, News Letter 



21 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on pa when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
; west of New York, covers 9.000 square feet of 
floor Bpace. and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
i l in take you through the different 
depart n vial, copying, enlarging, 

Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything in Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St.. San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



VETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street, 



San Francises 



Tips to Automobi lists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of first and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North iirst street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



PALO ALTO — LARKIN'S CAFE— just opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 



MONTEREY COUNTY. 
SOLEDAD.— JOHNSON'S GARAGE. Gas, oils, machine shop, repairing, 
storage. Telephone Main 171. Autos for hire day or night. Agency 
Overland and Kissel cars. 

MONTEREY.— SELBY BROS. GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Agents 
for Stutz and Oakland cars. Autos lor hire. Oil, gasoline and sundries. 
First-class repair work and service. Phone Monterey 33. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
SANTA CRUZ.— Stop at JENSEN BROS. AUTO CO., the newest and 
finest equipped garage and machine shop. One-half block from St. George 
Hotel. One block to right after crossing covered bridge. Phone 697. 

SANTA CRUZ. — When in Santa Cruz stop with the BEACH GARAGE, 
opposite the Casa Del Rey Hotei. Noted tor its high-class service. Com- 



plete repair shop, open day and -night, 
tires. 



Full line of accessories and 



SONOMA COUNTY. 
Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa. "You Auto" stop here, 
varii-ly is served. 



A menu of limited 



SANTA ROSA.— GRAND GARAGE, Third and Main Sts., opp. Court- 
house. First-class repair work. Electric starting system and batteries re- 
charged. Phone 166. Cadillac cars. 



GEYSER VI LLE.— PIONEER GARAGE, A. Lampson & Sons, Props. 
Fully equipped blacksmith and machine shop. Studebaker headquarters. 
Tires in stock; supplies and repairs. Tel. Main 251. Main St., Geyservllle. 

PETALUMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
& Murphy, Props. Cor. Third and C Sts; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 
general machine work and gear cutting; supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries. 

CLOVERDALE.— WARREN'S GARAGE. Geo. F. Warren. Prop. Fully 
equipped blacksmith and machine shop; Studebaker headquarters; tires In 
stock: supplies and repairs. Upper West SL. Cloverdale. Phone Main 221. 



LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT.— WALTERS & FRASER Garage and Machine Shop. Fifth 
anil Main Sts. Vulcanizing, gasoline and lubricants. General machine and 
electrical work. W. Walters. Y. E. Frazer. Phone Main 84. 



LAKEPORT. — LAKEVIEW HOTEL (under new management), on Clear 
I-Tke. Every convenience for automoblllsts. Garages near by. Rates 
reasonable. F. E. Carpenter, Proprietor. 



San Francisco 



"Pillsbury's Pictures" 

of California's Scenic Beauty Soots. When you return 
from your auto trip have your films finished by experts 
and see the largest collection of Western views at 
219 POWELL STREET 



A FEW BARGAINS 



BAKER ELECTRIC 
FLANDERS ELECTRIC 
WOODS ELECTRIC 
OVERLAND ROADSTER 
7 PASSENGER KNOX 

BOX 101, 



NEW 
NEW 
NEW 
$ 500 
3,500 



NEWS LETTER 

21 SUTTER STREET. 



S. F. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



leading American (3rs 



$ukk 



HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 
San Francisco 

Prices F. O. 8. Factory. 

Models Prices 

24 Runabout $950 

26 Touring Car 1050 

30 Roadster 1126 

31 Touring C \x 1285 

40 Touring Car 1650 




Model 

2-Pass. 

5-Pass. 

5-Pass. 

7-Pass. 



J. I. CASE T. M. CO., INC. 
San Francisco. 
Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

tt p PrlC6 

Roadster 30.' $1600 

Touring 30 1500 

Touring 40 £200 

Touring 40 2400 



Chalmers 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1913 Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model "6," Thlrty-sbc. 

Touring Car, 5-pass $2400 $1950 

Touring Car. 7-Pass 2600 2160 

Torpedo, 4-Pass 2400 1960 

Roadster. 2-Pass 2400 1950 

All prices Include full equipment and are f. o. b. 
Detroit. 




PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 
Golden Gate Avenue and Polk St., San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. San Francisco, 
Models — 

40 — 4-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster $1800 

40 — 4-eyl. 6 Pass. Touring 1800 

60 — 6-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster 2600 

60 — 6-cyl. 4 Pass. Demi-Tonneau 2600 

60— 6-cyl. 6 Pass. Touring 2600 

60 — 6-cyl. 7 Pass. Touring 2650 




OSEN-McFARLAND AUTO CO. 
San Francisco and San Jose 



Empire 31 $1060 

5-Passenger touring car, completely equipped. 




Zr&vd 



PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model — Price 

Model "T" Touring Car $600 

Model "T" Runabout 626 

Model "T" Town Car 800 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 
301 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Standard Models 

Model H. P. Price 

Touring Car 60 $2900 

Roadster 60 2900 

Town Car 60 3900 




HAYNES AUTO SALES CO. 

Turk at Polk St. 
Prices F. O. B. Pacific Coast. 

Model 24— 2, 4 and 6 Pass. (4-cyl.) $1,950 

Model 24— Coupe (4-cyl.) 2,400 

Model 23—2, 4 and 5 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2.700 

Model 23— 6 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2.U50 

Model 23— Coupe (6-cyl.) 3,200 

Model 23— Limousine (6-cyl.) 3,850 




H. O. HARRISON 



1036 Van Ness Avenue 



San Francisco 



Standard Models 



Prices F. O. 
Model "37 37 h. p. 

Touring Car $1876 

Phaeton 1876 

Roadster J875 

Limousine 3250 

Coupe 2350 



B. Factory. 
Model "64" 
Touring Car 



64 h. p. 

...$2450 

Phaeton 2450 

Roadster 2450 

Limousine 3750 

Coupe 2950 



r 




BEKINS-SPEERS MOTOR CO. 
Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 



Type 72 


Prices F. 


O. B. Factory Type 77 


Model — 


Price 


Model- 


Price 


7-Pass. 


Touring $5000 


S-Pass. 


Touring $3260 


5-Pass. 


Touring 6000 


2-Pass. 


Runab't 3250 


1-Pass. 


Touring 6000 


6-Pass. 


Limous'n 4460 


4-Pass. 


Toy Ton. 5000 


6-Pass 


Limous'n 4460 


'2-Pass. 


Runab't 6000 


3 -Pass. 


Coupe 3860 


7-Pass. 


Limous'n 6500 








MARION MOTOR CAR CO. 

r,55 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

37-A Touring 40 $1476 

48-A Touring 48 1850 

36-A Roadster 40 1425 

3S-A Roadster 40 1476 

All Cars Completely Equipped. 



T 



A\ARA\QN 



MORRIS KENNEDY CO., INC., 

545 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

New Series Marmon "Thirty-Two" 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Mod. Thirty-Two Landaulet $4100 

Chassis $2500 Marmon "Six' 



Five-Pass. Tour- 
ing Car 3000 

Four-Pass. Sub- 
urban 3000 

Roadster 2900 

Speedster 2850 

Limousine 4000 



2, 4, 6 and 7-pas- 

senger $5000 

Limousine 6280 

Landaulet 6350 

Berllne Limousine 

6450 



Palge-Detrolt Company to Have Additional Factory 

Ground has been broken for the new Paige-Detroit factory, 
which that company is having built, and which will be com- 
pleted according to present plans somewhere about October 1st. 

The new structure will have a frontage of 600x60 feet wide 
and will be three stories high. This will be only part of a 
group of structures that will make up the new Paige-Detroit 
home. While the structure will only be built to three stories 
at the present time, the foundations have been made so strong 
that two additional stories can be added later on, and at the 
present rate of growth of the company, this will probably have 
to be done in the near future. 

The above addition to the present factory facilities will 
greatly aid in turning out of the 15,000 Paige-Detroit cars for 
the coming year that this company plan to put out. 



English Engineers Visit Goodyear Factory 

Taking advantage of their presence near Akron, a number of 
English engineers visiting Cleveland and Detroit, took a side 
trip to Akron and visited the Goodyear Tire factory. 

What struck the visitors most was the idea of specialization 
that is being developed by American tire manufacturers. "Sev- 
eral years ago, America looked to Europe for ideas," said E. 
R. Hall, chief of the experimental department for the Goodyear 
plant, "not only in structural tendencies of foreign motor cars, 
but also for tire designing. Now, however, the tables are 
changed, and it is safe to say that this country is several years 
ahead of the rest of the world in the designing and constructing 
of all types of tires. In this country we have tires for every 
class of work: special tires for electrics and for gasoline cars, 
for trucks and for pleasure cars, and so on down the line." 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



^lt/^J^Lo3&L^ c^ftf" Coxrv@rden.oe 
<xr5? PricesS JoV^ofttje^ J3xx>/£x> 




MICHIGAN MOTOR CAR CO. 

California Branch 

283-291 Golden Gate Ave San Francisco 

Imperial Garage — Oakland 

Standard Models 

Model— Price 

"L" and "O" 33 h. p $1690 

"R" and "S" 40 h. p. 1876 



Maxwell 



UNITED MOTORS S. F. COMPANY. 

Polk St., near McAllister San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model 25, 5-Pass. Touring Car 

Model 35, 6-Pass. Touring Car $1086 

Model 40, 5-Pass. Touring Car 1560 

Model 50, 7-Pass. Touring Car 2350 



MERCER 



SIMPLEX-MERCER PAC. COAST AGENCY 

1319 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

Type 35, Series G. 4-Pass 32.4 h. p. $3100 

Type 35, Series H. 5-Pass 32.1 h. p. 3100 

Type 35, Series J, Raee'b't 30.G h. p 2850 

Type 35, Series K. Runabout ..30.6 h. p. 2850 




LOUIS J. BORIE, 

Central and Northern Distributor, 
1255 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Delivered In San Francisco. 

Price 

Metz "2214, " fully equipped, 22 h. p $676 

Metz Special, 22ft h. p 495 



c/^S 



HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 

523 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Five Models, Improved Series V. 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Semi-Racing Roadster $2750 

Speedway Roadster 3160 

Toy Tonneau 3300 

Five-Passenger Touring Car 3300 

Seven-Passenger Touring Car 3400 

Also Limousines, Sedans and Coupes. 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 
301 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Standard Models. 



Model 

69-T 

69-F 

G9-R 

69-C 



H. P. 

30 h. p 
30 h. p, 
30 h. p. 
30 h. p 



Price 
$1100 
1126 
1100 
1650 



Model 
71-T 
71-P 
71-R 



H. P. 
45 h. p. 
45 h. p. 
45 h. p. 



Price 
$1625 
1626 
1625 




PATHFINDER MOTOR CAR CO. 

Geary and Polk Sts. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Five-Pass, touring car. 40 horsepower $2185 

Four-Pass, phaeton, 40 horsepower 2185 

Two-Pass. Roadster. 40 horsepower 2160 

Three-Pass, coach, 40 horsepower 2500 

Two-Paaa. cruiser. 40 horsepower 2000 

iv wagon. 40 horsepower 2000 




PIERCE-ARROW SALES CO. 
Geary and Polk Sts. San Francisco 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Model 


H. P. 






Price 


38-C 


38 h. p. 


5-Pass. 


Touring 


$4300 


48-B 


48 h. p 


7-Pass. 


Touring 


5000 


66-A 


66 h. p. 


7- Pass. 


Touring 


6000 




FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

F. O. B. San Francisco. 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Model "T" Underslung Touring Car $1125 

Model "N" Underslung Roadster 1076 

Model "H" Underslung Touring Car 1625 

Regal Underslung Colonial Coupe 1375 

Model "C" Standard Touring Car 1375 



REO 



REO-PACIFIC COMPANY 
Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



Standard Models. 

Model H. P. 

5-Passenger 30-35 h. p.. 

2-Passenger 30-35 h. p.. 

1% Ton Truck 30-35 h. p.. 



Price 
.$1296 
. 1296 
. 1975 




AUTO SALES CO. 
418 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. q 

"40" 6-Pass. Touring Car $2000 

"40" 4-Pass. Torpedo 2000 

"40" Limousine 3000 

M Special 5-Pass. Touring 1900 

"82" Model R 5-Pass. Touring 1500 

"3 •■■ Model W 6-Pass. Touring 1350 

"32" Model RX Roadster 1450 



WINTON SIX 



THEWINTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

S. E. Cor. Sutter and Van Ness 
F O. H. Factory 



Roadster $3ooo 

Toy Tonneau 3000 

touring 3000 

<'-ra-> Torpe 



Touring 
Ltanooaloe 

Laodaulet 



♦3250 

1250 

i ..i 



Klssel-Kar 1914 Models Up-to-the-Mlnute Cars 

The Kissel Motor Car Company takes immediate cognizance 
of the changing ideas and requirements of the motorists," said 
P. S. Nicholas, sales manager of the Pacific Kissel-Kar branch, 
in discussing the new 1914 models of that company's factory. 
"It acts on any suggestion that will improve its cars, and bring 
them nearer to that perfection which all factories are aiming 
to attain. Our four-cylinder model 40 h. p. is the representative 
of this type of car, selling at a moderate price 4 the exemplifica- 
tion of all that is modern and up to the minute in motor cars. 
Our new model, the 'Little Six.' which we expect sometime 
during the early part of the present month, we firmly believe 
measures up to a standard that few other cars have reached. 
Designed along original lines, with the new French top, which 
eliminates the forward bow, the 'Little Six' should prove very 



popular with discriminating motorists. Our 'Big Six' completes 
our line, and is straight-lined, powerful and silent running to 
a degree." * * * 

Gear Shifting a Fine Art 

When a driver has to shift the gears of his car some one 
hundred and twenty-five times on an average in every twenty- 
five miles, the operation develops into a fine art. Such is the 
experience of George B. Stickly, rural free mail carrier in 
the Devil's Lake country of Michigan. Stickly's speedometer 
shows that his car has traveled over 4,000 miles, which means 
that he has somewhere near 20,000 stops to his credit. 

"The roads that I travel are as bad as can be found almost 
anywhere," said Stickly, "and I get plenty of hills and sand 
in my day's run, but my Buick '24' does not seem to mind as 
long as the gasoline holds out." 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



Now Aimtonadbi® IResfefcrfittans 



New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
July 5th. The number of automobile licenses authorized to 
date for the State of California is 110,544. 

DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEX, 140 Kansas St.. S. F Ford 

WERNER, J. H., 130 Kearny St., S. F Marion 

SWIXNERTON. A. B., 954 Monadnock Bldg.. S. F Marion 

HANSON. HENRY', S52 Clayton St.. S. F. . . '. Stearns 

GRENNAN, P. F., 72 Page St.. S. F Wichita 

VIRGINIA MARKET, 3366 Mission St.. S. F Wichita 

GEGGE, DR. D. M., 2924 Steiner St.. S. F Winton 

SOOY, CHAS. H.. 190 Edgewood Ave.. S. F Studebaker 

NORTON, J. J., 2702 20th St., S. F Case 

MEYN, HENRY. 2S19 16th St.. S. F Ford 

JOHNSON, GEORGE, care Roos Bros., S. F Lippard-Sti ward 

DAVIS, HOWARD W., East Auburn Mercer 

STANDARD OIL CO.. Standard Oil Bldg.. S. F Haynes 

THATCHER. DR. H. M.. 1222 Cole St.. S. F Oakland 

PARRISH. ELIZABETH R., 1100 Fulton St.. S. F Alco 

WARDROBE LAUNDRY' CO.. 202 Ellis St.. S. F Ford 

GREEN. I. G., 422 Sacramento St., S. F Ford 

ROBERTS. G. H.. 150 Franklin St., S. F Ford 

JAFFE. .1. L., >6 2d St.. S. F Marion 

ROBINSON. A. W., 12('.ii Market St.. S. F Overland 

FOLEY'. J. J., 46 Kearny St., S. F R-C-H 

TRIMLETT, ROBERT, care 162 12th St.. Oakland Butch 

TISDALE, DR. C. L.. 1601 Alameda Ave.. Alameda Haynes 

BECKETT, L. J., 32 E. Santa Clara St.. San Jose American 

BROWN. ERGAR P., Madera Bulck 

PIERCE BROS., care 46S Golden Gate Ave.. S. F Wichita 

OBERTI. F. W.. Suisun Wichita 

PARKER, CHARLEY. Colusa Overland 

STEVEN'S. E.. Butte City Ford 

WILDERMAN. WM.. Willows , Flanders 

BEACH, G. F., Corona Studebaker 

ARMOUR FERTILIZER WORKS. Porterville Ford 

IWATA H.. F and Kern Sts.. Fresno Cadillac 

MORGAN. R. W., Hanford .Overland 

PARKMAN, W. E., First Nat'l Bk. Bldg., San Jose Marion 

JONES, J. W.. 960 Callisch St.. Fresno Chalmers 

JENSEN BROS.. Gustine Overland 

STEIFF. H. A., Lakeport Marion 

.GARNER, J. C 127 Wagner St.. Fresno Imperial 

RICE, N. D., Corning Metz 

ARUNDELL. F. S., R. F. D. No. 1, Oxnard Kissel 

FISHER, W. H.. BakersHeld Overland 

SCOFIELD, WM.. S00 University Ave. Palo Alto Studebaker 

MOONEY" C. N., Blue Lake Marion 

KAY V SER, H., care Russ House, San Jose Overland 

DUNFIELD & RIDDLE, Colusa Case 

MAZE, ANDY. Bell Station Ford 

GRAGG, H. E.. 207 Park Ave.. Modesto Chalmers 

EARLL. .MRS. WM.. 23S Hazel St.. Chico studebaker 

RICHARDSON. P. C R. F. D. No. 2. Chico Ford 

NBEL, CHAS., Gridley Ford 

r.ILMORE. F. A.. 1225 7th St.. Red Bluff Haynes 

MILLION, C. W.. Corning I-H-C 

DONNER, H. H.. Milton Ford 

TOMPKINS, H. B.. St. Francis Hotel. Sacramento Studebaker 

I'HAYER. MRS. W. D.. 2531 O St.. Sacramento Ford 

BRADY'. J. B., 60 Fremont St.. S. F .' Packard 

CONNELL, G, B„ 316 S. Hockett St.. Porterville Ford 

REICHMAN. E., Fort Jones Case 

c'ULLINEN. G. A.. Red Bluff Overland 

REIMAN, II. '!.. Windsor Studebaker 

NORRIS. J. N.. Santa Rosa Studebaker 

ERWIN. C. A. Winters ..'. Reo 

PACIFIC GAS & ELEC. CO.. 445 Sutter St., S. F Ford 

FITZGERALD, JOHN. Woodland Studebaker 

KERCHEYAL. H. O.. Sutter Hotel. S. F '...Haynes 

CLAYBURGH, L. P.. 1528 Jerrold Ave.. S. F 1'..]..- Hartford 

I'ERASSO, J., 801 Athens St.. S. F R llei 

MAGEE. WM. A., 5 Montgomery St.. S. F H immobile 

MABEE. J. I.. Presidio. S. F Regal 

MORBIO. ADOLPH. 2200 Vallcjo St.. S. F Regal 

i'UAPIN, F. Y., St. Mark Hotel. Oakland National 

FRASER, ANNA G., 540 2Sth St.. Oakland uulck 

HORSW11.L, MARY' A.. 1st and Washington Sts., Oakland. r Hartford 

LANDREGAN & WHITE. 61st and \.l. lin , Oakland Bulck 

CHRISTENSON. ANDREW, 2150 Afameds Ave., Alameda Kissel 

BEGIER, F. H„ box 172, San Leandro Bulck 

PHIPPS, J. A.. Amador ■■ Cartercar 

ELDREDGE. G. S.. Fort Bragg Ford 

KIXSLOW BROS.. 200 4th St., Santa R..sa Overland 

MORSE, J. G.. R. F. D. Sebastopol Overland 

SPENKER. JOS. C, R. F. D. No. 4. box 15. Modesto Mitchell 

OLTER, W. H„ 296 Park Ave.. San Jose Studebaker 

EMERSON, F. C 209 S. 14th St., San Jose Studebaker 

STUME, E. R„ Los Gatos Studebaker 

WISDOM, P. L., 169 Waverly St.. Pal.. Alt.. Studebaker 

McBAIN, JOHN, Mountain View Studebaker 

BOWLES, SCOTT, 815 D St., Petaluma Bulck 



HESS, W. B., R. F. D. No. 2, Santa Cruz Ford 

TOTTEN, GEO. P., S21 E. Lindsay St.. Stockton Cole 

ORNBAUM. ED., Oakdale Overland 

ROBERTS. T. G., Oakdale Overland 

SNODDERLY', E. M., P. O. box. 246, East Auburn Ford 

McCuY, R. H.. R. F. D. No. 1. Stockton Regal 

WORLEY'. J. B.. R. F. D. No. 4, box 47. Hanford Studebaker 

POSTON, ERNEST El Centro Reo 

BOUCKLEY. BARABA. Vacaville Ford 

BLOCKWITZ, MRS. MAX. San Anselmo Ford 

WAYLAND, L. B., care M. J. Brandenstein, S. F Ford 

BILLS. ROBERT C, 1215 26th St.. Sacramento Pope-Hartford 

BREEDLOVE, I. N., 175 Santa Rosa Ave., Oakland Cadillac 

WOOLSEY. J. R.. 126 Boulevard Place, Oakland Haynes 

ANDERSON, B. G.. 924 Cypress Ave., Oakland Ford 

CUNNINGHAM, JR.. ARTHUR L.. 2346 College Ave., Berkeley ...Premier 

SHUEY, R. A.. 2451 Ashby Ave., Berkeley Cadillac 

ESCHEN. J. C. 1303 Caroline St., Alameda Cadillac 

MULQL T EENEl r , M. C. Midway, Alameda County Chalmers 

SONNICKSON, A., box 175 Palo Alto Ford 

ELITE MARKET, 218 University Ave.. Palo Alto Ford 

VANDERVOORT BROS.. 525 Alma St.. Palo Alto Detrolter 

CALKINS. A. W., Mountain View Regal 

ANDERSON. MRS. NAT, It. F. D. No. 3. BakersHeld Ford 

PULLEN, MRS. M. E.. 1234 C St.. Eureka Metz 

EVERTON, H. A.. Craftonville Ford 

HECKENDORN, THOS.. Corona Ford 

DOTSON. E. F.. Corona Ford 

MENDOCINO STATE HOSPITAL. Ukiah Ford 

JACKSON, C, M., Markleeville Studebaker 

GARDNER. LULU. 2711 Chester Ave.. BakersHeld Mitchell 

HARVEY, A. M„ Earlimart, Tulare County Ford 

KARPE, A. II.. East BakersHeld Overland 

STEPHANI. G. F.. Winters Overland 

WAKERLY. G. A.. Pig Ranch Road. Napa overland 

TURNER, MRS. B. J.. Artesla Hotel, Hanford Little Giant 

NEU. JOHN A.. 2015 Fresno St.. Fresno King 

CORBIERE. HENRY J.. SI 8th St.. Chico Ford 

HUNTER. O. G.. Campo Seco Stoddard-Dayton 

MALTBY, MAY'NARD. 1615 12th St.. Sacramento Pope-Hartford 

GRAHAM. J. M., Park, Eldorado County Stutz 

GRIFFEN, R. C. 801 S; 3d St.. San Jose Ford 

SHRODE. A.. Midland. Kern County Hupmoblle 

GREEN. FRED. Grafton studebaker 

HARDEN. F. E.. Holtville Bulck 

TRAVERS. J. L.. El Centro Bulck 

CATLIN. ZELLA, Exeter Studebaker 

MURPHY'. J. N., Farmersvllle, Tulare County Studebaker 

FERRETTI. CLARENCE. Sutter Cicek .-. Hupmoblle 

KENYON, PERCY, 1438 N. Center St., Stockton Moon 

MULL, A. M.. 2715 M St., Sacramento Oakland 

KEIFER, O. C, care Don Lee. S. F Cadillac 

PAC. GAS & ELEC. CO.. 445 Sutter St.. S. F Mercer 

S. P. C. A.. 2514 16th St.. S. F Ford 

KOBICKE. C. H., 34 Ellis St.. S. F Federal 

NELSON. MAEZIE A.. Westminster Apts., S. F Ford 

LAFFERTY. J. T.. 1229 'Hi Ave.. S. F Regal 

GLOBE GRAIN & MILL. CO.. S. F Ford 

SEAR1.E. c. W. F.. Angel Island Ford 

CROMER. C. L... 734 Grand Ave.. Oakland Studebaker 

GILMAN. ANTOINETTE. SSI Calmar Ave. Oakland Lozler 

BROWX. CAPT. 'I'.. 5117 Foothill Boulevard. Oakland Paige 

HEATH. F. E.. 1812 Oxford St., Berkeley Rambler 

FISHER BAK. CO., Bonar and AIlBton Way. Berkeley. .Llppard-Stewart 

HEATH. MARJORIE, 1S12 Oxford St.. Alameda Rambler 

ROGERS. ALFRED, 1410 Santa Clara Ave., Alameda Ford 

IIAK.MAXX BROS.. Liveimore Ford 

BROWN, ROBERT. ::.". .Mound St. Redw I City Ford 

NEUSTADTER BROS., box 698 San Jose Haynes 

ROBERTS, I.. 10. . Chico Overland 

TRED WAV. MRS.. I.od: ' Ford 

I.ATTIX. I.E. iX. 211 B. Walnut St.. Lo.li Ford 

EDELMAN, A. S., It. F. 1 >. X... i. box 67. Lodi Ford 

SMITH, W. II.. 899 S. 11th St., San Jose Studebaker 

SHEDD. A. E., P. O. box 271. .Madera Michigan 

WELLS, WILLIS G., Ceres .' Ford 

TROXEL, S. K.. 80 Fourth St.. ChlCO Overland 

MEIIL. FRED, R. F. I... Xo. 2. Petaluma , Ford 

PARRISH. MRS. L. M.. Soquel Chalmers 

THOMAS. H. I... Keystone Ford 

HOUX, RAYMOND, Maxwell Paige 

TURLOCK IRRIGATION DISTRICT, Turlock Ford 

BORMANN, H. F.. Yountvlllc Maxwell 

BRYANT, ALLEN, l""* llunibol.lt St.. Santa Rosa Ford 

NETHERTON, GEO. B., .Martinez Auburn 

lord. ELMER. Fresno Studebaker 

GOULD. MRS. C. II.. 905 Third si.. Eureka Ford 

LARSEN. A.. 321)3 I. St.. Eureka Ford 

SCHORR. ADOLPH. 2938 Pine St.. Eureka Ford 

JOSEPH, ALBERT, care Don Leo. S. F Cadillac 

I leLAND. C. O.. 2120 N St.. Sacramento Ford 

CROCKER-HUFFMAN LAND CO.. Merced Loco 

ROBINSON. ALBERT. 9is .1 St.. Sacramento Overland 

BORNHORST, W. F.. St. Helena Studebaker 

LOVETTE, G. O., Willows Studebaker 

BOY. 10. H.. Butte City Studebaker 

HANSEN, N., Glenn Studebaker 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



NEWS FROM WITTER SPRINGS. 

Witter Springs attracted a large crowd of pleasure seekers 
for over the Fourth, many of them making ffie trip by automo- 
bile. Every effort was made by the management of the hotel 
to make the holiday a merry one, quite an elaborate program 
having been prepared for the occasion. There were billiard 
and bowling tournaments, a swimming contest, a gymkhana, 
and on Friday evening, fireworks and a dance. Saturday a trip 
around Clear Lake was enjoyed. Among those who motored 
to the springs for the National Holiday were Mr. and Mrs. Cy- 
rus Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Madison, Miss Dorothy Madison, 
Mrs. H. C. Watson, Miss Katherine Watson, Miss Helen Wat- 
son, Mrs. J. G. Kittle, Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Avenali, Miss Emily 
Carolan, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Waller, Miss Evelyn Waller, 
Lawrence Waller, Paul Fagan, Mrs. M. B. Smith, Miss Kath- 
leen B. Coleman, Miss Florence Bandmann, E. O. Sessions, Mr. 
and Mrs. M. J. Savage, Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt Davenport, Miss 
Cooper, Miss Bouton, Mr. and Mrs. 0. O. Edwards, Everett N. 
Bee, Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Tucker, Mr. 
and Mrs. R. H. Rodman, and Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Christenson. 



It 



San Francisco, the beloved of all the world, stands next 

to New York in the matter of cafes. It was here that the 
cabaret idea was conceived, a craze which has encircled the 
whole civilized world. To retain its fame for originality, San 
Francisco is now offering its cafe frequenters who have particu- 
lar tastes a grand opera quartet at Tait's. This cafe has al- 
ways been foremost in the ranks of the country's first class 
places. The management here is ever-making a special effort 
to please the pleasure seekers who want the best of foods 
served to the accompaniment of real high-class entertainment. 
Tait's is an ideal place in which to "drop in to lunch," away 
from the hot and bustling street, where the soft-shaded lights 
give an air of tone and refinement to the artistic decorations. 
The Tait special fifty cent luncheon, which is daily served, 
makes a jest of "the high cost of living," which one hears so 
much about nowadays. 



"If we would live healthfully and allow our children to 

develop normally, we must revert to natural conditions so far 
as the exigencies of civilized life will permit us." Such is the 
statement of a famous old-world physician. Of course, he 
means that, seeing that we must wear clothes, we should wear 
those which Nature says are the most sensible and healthful. 
The well-known investigator of the baneful influences which 
lead to ill-health, Dr. Deimel, based his study upon just such a 
premise as we have quoted above. And that is why there is on 
the market to-day an underwear known as Dr. Deimel Linen- 
Mesh. And the scientist we have quoted says that linen-mesh 
is as warm as flannel, and possesses the ventilating qualities 
flannel does not possess. At 176 Sutter street, near Kearny, is a 
store which is doing much to reduce the spread of tuberculosis. 
The store is the Deimel Linen-Mesh house, and their advice is 
worth considering. 



Lovers of music, as well as all epicures, are indebted to 

Noah W. Gray, manager of Hotel Shattuck, Berkeley, for the 
Sunday evening dinners which he has established as a regular 
feature in the hotel cafe. The musical program is composed of 
both popular and concert numbers of exceptional merit, and 
the services of Miss Grace Bromfield, soprano soloist, add 
to the enjoyment. The dinner on Sunday evenings is excep- 
tionally good, and affords a variety of choice for the charge of 
one dollar which is not surpassed by any cafe in the Bay cities. 



Dr. Byron Haines, Dentist, has resumed practice at his offices In Gunst 
Building. S. W. corner Geary and Powell streets. 

The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott. 21 Sutter Street. San Franc(fco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 35S4 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal.. Post-office as second-class mall matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative. 158 Fifth Ave 

Chicago Office — Jno. A. Tenney, 452 Peoples Gas Building. Chicago. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr. 625 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — George Street & Co.. SO Cornhlll. E. C. England. 

Matter Intended for publication In the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 
be sent to the office 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (Including postage)— 1 year. 14 00: ( months 11 H 
Foreign— 1 year MOO. « months. MX 



HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



APPEALS TO ALL WHO CAN APPRECIATE 
ITS UNRIVALED PURITY AND EXCELLENCE, 
ITS UNEQUALED QUALITY AND FLAVOR 





J> 



Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON. Baltimore, Md. 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to this city, and la now to be 
found in Room 424, Flood Building. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN E r S-AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney -at- Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg- 830 Market St Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. AH legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St., above Bush, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 601. 





MAYERL E'S GERMAN EY EWATER 

la a perfectly harmless eye remedy 

for strained, inflamed, sore, waiery 

painful, burning, smarting, blurring. 

itchy eyes: red, gluey or heavy lids; 

floating spots, injured eyes, indispensable for mechanics exposing their eyes 

to the wind, sun and dust. At druggists fiOc: by mall fc^c. direct from 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Grtduite Gennsn Fipert Oplicisn snd Optometrist 
960 Market St., Sin Francisco 

Charter Member of Americss Associates of Opticians (Established 18 Years) 

Majerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers (a enemies! cloth), large size3 for 25c 



OPPOSITE MISSION STREET 
ENTRANCE TO EMPORIUM 



P. E. o'hair & CO. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

SOLD DIRECT TO YOU 



857 MISSION ST. 



Phone Sutter 1813 



Blake. Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



37-45 First Street 

Private Exchange Connecting 



Phone Sutter 2230 
Departments 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



REMEMBER!!! 

WE WRITE 
Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automo- 
bile, Plate Glass, Burglary, Elevator, and Health 
and Accident Insurance. 

PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 



San Francisco. Cal. 



C. H. CRAWFORD. President 



1863 1913 

FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $8,650,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Saniome Street*, tan Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Dinsmore i. C. Meossdorffer James W. Dean 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 

Phone Douglas 2283 
S12 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Home Phone C 2899 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1860. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total Assets 7,736,110 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,266.021 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building - San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 

Capital. $400,000 Assets, Over a Million 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best in the West) 

Employers' Liability. Genera] Liability, Ten ins. Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Eealtti 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bondfi 

Officers— Edmund F. Green, President ; Marshal A. Frank. Vice-Presi- 
dent; Carl G. Brown, Secretary; I-. P. Deering, Counsel. L. B. Hogo, 
General Manager Accident and Sealtb Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

The Home Insurance Company 



Organized 1863. 



Cash Capital. $3,000,000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners any- 
where In United States. Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss by 
fire. Automobile insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental Income by Are. 
H. L. ROPF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN. Asst General Agent. 

3?1 Sansorne Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PEASE. President 589. 491. 593 Market St. 




The beat and 

■trongeit 
Garden Hole 

Guaranteed tn 

atand 700 Iba 

Preaiura 

TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

San Francisco 

1 




5INSVKM 




Employers Active 
For Referendum. 



That the Governor signed the 
Workmen's Compensation Bill de- 
spite the protests of the employers 
of California and others interested 
in the future of all institutions employing labor in this State, 
has caused the Employers' Federation of California to cause 
petitions to be prepared and sent to every city in the State ask- 
ing for a referendum election. 

The petitions are rapidly being filled, and it is expected that 
they will have more than the required amount of signatures by 
August 10th, when the time of filing expires. 

The Employers' Federation is composed of some 2,500 mem- 
bers who employ more than 200,000 workmen. It is the in- 
tention of those in charge of the petitions to secure enough sig- 
natures on the referendum petitions to record the opposition 
of enough voters to make certain just what the temper of the 
people is with regard to the Compensation rill. 

It is announced that the work of instituting an initiative act 
to replace the objectionable law will shortly be commenced. 

The California legislature of 1913 appropriated $363,070 to 

the use of the industrial accident commission. Of this amount 

$100,000 is intended as the reserve fund or capital of the State 

compensation insurance company provided by the Workmen's 

Compensation Act. The balance of $263,070 is for the use of 

the industrial accident commission in its various departments 

during the next two years. 

* * * 



The number of referendum peti- 
Oppose Blue Sky Law. tions which are in circulation 
against enactments of the Califor- 
nia Legislature of 1913 seem to point to the fact that there is 
a general opinion that the Progressive administration was not 
as satisfactory as it might have been, as far as progress is 
concerned. 

Referendum petitions are in circulation against the Blue Sky 
Law passed this spring and recently signed by the Governor. 
The original bill, which was patterned after the Kansas law, 
was strongly opposed, and resulted in an amended one which 
is said to be equally objectionable, and although this fact 
was repeatedly pointed out to the Governor, the amended bill 
was made legal by the official signature. 

It is claimed that this bill will retard the development of 
the State, and the commissioner of corporations created by the 
Act is given autocratic powers which are contrary to reason, 
progress or justice. 

The Blue Sky Law passed by the Oregon legislature this 
year and effective for the past three weeks, is also threatened 
with the referendum test. Opponents of the Act claim that in 
requiring them to file detailed statements with the corporation 
commissioner, the law exposes their operations to rivals, en- 
dangering their businesses. Opposition to the Oregon law is 

said to come chiefly from mining and oil promoters. 

* * * 

Reduction of the fire waste will be given a prominent place 
by the National Conservation Congress, to be held at Wash- 
ington in November. 



OLD FORESTER 

Finest Whisky in the World 
Straight from Distillery to You 

Take a bottle home and treat your friends right 

ALL DEALERS 
Cut red number off the label, bring it to our office and re- 
ceive a Pocket Memo Book. 

KENTUCKY MERCANTILE CO. 

488 Sutter St, San Francisco Phone Sutter 4031 



July 12, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



W. L. Hathaway, commissioner for 
Endorses This City the World's Insurance Congress, re- 

For 1915. ports that San Francisco is being 

generally and strongly endorsed as 
the meeting place for the National Association of Life Un- 
derwriters in 1915. Under date of June 26th, Commissioner 
Hathaway announced : 

"We are advised that the Nebraska Association of Life Un- 
derwriters, at a meeting held June 21st, unanimously recom- 
mended that the 1915 convention of the National Association 
of Life Underwriters be held in San Francisco at the time of 
the World's Insurance Congress. This action, following imme- 
diately that of the Oregon association, goes in demonstrate the 
hearty endorsement that this congress is receiving throughout 

the country." 

* * * 

The California Insurance Depart- 
California Department ment's record for the issue of com- 
Record Wori^. panies' and agents' licenses for the 

new insurance year shows that the 
department had prepared the certificates of authority for the 
over two hundred companies operating in the State, while 
more than 20,000 agents' licenses were ready for delivery. It 
is expected with the end of the present week the department 
will have furnished all licenses and other papers, and again be 
giving its entire attention to regular work. The excellent pro- 
gress in issuing licenses for the new year is due to the sys- 
tematic work of the department, which a month ago asked the 
companies to furnish lists of agents for whom licenses were de- 
sired in order that they could be prepared for delivery on July 

1st, when the new year began. 

* * * 

Nebraska's banking department has notified the building 
associations of the State that they must require tornado as 
well as fire insurance protection on all loans made by them. 
This is the result of the recent Omaha tornado, where the need 

was clearly demonstrated. 

* * * 

Companies report the loss ratio for June in the West as un- 
usually large, fires occurring in all parts of the field and in 
all classes of property. Lightning losses are also numerous 
just now. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa. Cafe attached. Steaks, chickens, squabs and 
ihell fish to order. Moderate prices. 



Phonw 



Sutter 1072 
Home C 3970 
Home C 4781. Hotel 



Cyril Amanton 
Henry Rtttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 

RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Bast French Dinner In the City with Wine. $i.o«. Banquet Halle and Private 

Dining Roome. Muelc Every Evening. 
862 Deary Street Sen Francteco 



J. B. Poo 



J. Bergei 



C. Meilhebueti 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 
415-411 inert St.. Sea Fraaeieco (Above Keeray) Escaeaia. Doaflee 2411 



Delicious Wines in Variety at 

JULES 



Under MONAPNOCK BUILDING 



Special 50c Luncheon and $1 Dinner With Music 
Served in Ladies' Grill as well as Main Dining Hall 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeinf; the 
finest cafe in America 



DOMINICAN COLLEGE 

SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 

*#* A* A" 

A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



SNELL SEMINARY 

2721 Channlng Way, Berkeley 

Boarding and day school. 
Founded 1874. From pri- 
mary to college entrance, 
August 12, 1913 

ADELAIDE SMITH 

Principal 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 
Rifle Range. Thirty-sixth Academic Year begins 
August 18th, 1913. Cadets may enter any time 
of the year. Summer camp on Eel River, June 
to August. 

Principals 
REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School ^6^° 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mill*. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
tor younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Beeft 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1626 California Street 



Ufa Claaaaa 
Day and Nlsbt 



illustrating- 
Skatohlnc 
Peuntlnr 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CAL. A home school for boys desiring a thorough 
itlon for college in a minimum of time. Location adjacent 
relty permits unusual advantages. Opens August 
Lt&lOgue. W. A. SHEDD. Headn, 



VALUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

SS FIRST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: Kearny 392 J 1538 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WISH 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 12, 1913. 



Low Rates East 

Via 

Southern Pacific 

Good on Limited Trains, also on Fast 
Express Trains with Tourist Sleeping Cars. 

Excellent Dining Car Service on All 
Trains. 

Stopovers Both Going and Returning. 

ROUND TRIP 



Baltimore 


$107.50 


Boston 


110.50 


Chicago 


72.50 


Colorado Springs 


55.00 


Dallas, Tex. 


62.50 


Denver 


55.00 


Duluth 


83.30 


Houston 


62.50 


Kansas City 


60.00 


Memphis 


70.00 


Minneapolis 


75.70 


Montreal 


108.50 


New Orleans 


70.00 


New York 


108.50 


Philadelphia 


108.50 


Quebec 


116.50 


St. Louis 


70.00 


St. Paul 


75.70 


Toronto 


95.70 


Washington 


107.50 


and other 


points 



Sale Dates — 

July 11, 15, 16. 17, 22, 23, 24, 30, 31. 

August 1, 2, 7. 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28. 

September 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11. 

Final return limit three months from date of sale, but not 
later than October 31, 1913. 



Southern Pacific 

SAN FRANCISCO : Flood Building, Palace Hotel, Ferry 
Station. Phone Kearny 3160. Third and Townsend 
Street Station. Phone Kearny 180. 

OAKLAND: Thirteenth street and Broadway. Phone 
Oakland 162. Sixteenth St. Station, Phone Lakeside 
1420. First-St. Station, Phone Oakland 7960. 



HOTEL AND SUMMER RESORTS 



WITTER SPRINGS 

Lake County's Finest Hotel 

NOW OPEN 



WILL BE OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND. 
HIGH CLASS IN EVERY DETAIL. A 
PLACE FOR PERFECT REST AND 
HEALTH. FOR INFORMATION AND 
RESERVATIONS ADDRESS 

Mrs. W. F. Morris, Hotel Victoria, 
Bush and Stockton Sts., S. F. 



HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND 

COTTAGES 

Incorporated 

Renovated and fully equipped. Permanent and 
first-class management. All modern conveniences 
and amusements. 

Address 



Manager" 

Hotel Ben Lomond 



Ben Lomond 



Santa Cruz County, Cal. 



TALLAC, Lake Tahoe 

Most scenic resort on Tahoe; 14 small lakes nearby; 
fine livery; automobile road now open via Placerville; 
State road; much the shortest and best route; auto stage 
now running between Tallac and Placerville; June fishing 
always best. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK, Tallac CaL 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

EDSON BROS., Props. 

A resort for pleasure and health, also Ideal for hunting and fishing. 

Is situated In Siskiyou County, Cal, on highway to Klamath Falls 

and Crater Lake. Good roads, garage, gasoline. Particulars write 

W. C. BROWN, Manager, Beswlck, Cal. 





BiUWUhtd Jiity 20. IftS* 




'.v; 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 



V*>s 




Vol. LXXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 19, 1913 



No. 3 



Which would you rather be: a Washington lobbyist or 

a common, ordinary book-agent? 

Staying up late at. night waiting for a change of luck 

doesn't pay when the police get busy on a raid. 

Why not a bureau of identification at Congress so that 

impersonations might become less easily accomplished? 

No more joking about war clouds. The Balkan troubles 

have demonstrated that they can get so black that they become 
tiresome. 

Surely William Howard Taft can give some lessons on 

cheerful losing. He still keeps on reducing — the latest is said 
to be 42 pounds. 

The way Bulgaria and Servia keep on getting the best 

of each other, one would think that they were- attempting to go 
the Mexicans one better. 

Even though that new nickel does look rather unmoney- 

like, there does not seem to be any great tendency to refuse 
to take all that can be taken. 

With a Democratic President in the White House, the 

Southern soldiers could well extend themselves in warmth at 
that great Gettysburg celebration. 

Who says the United States is not only original but the 

most versatile on earth? Look at our weather records from 
coast to coast and see for yourself. 

Special classes are being started to instruct the new 

women voters of Chicago. And they'll need quite a few if they 
are really going to succeed in driving out Hinky Dink. 

Who says that the cost of living hasn't gone down as a 

result of proposed tariff reductions? The price of a seat on 
the New York Stock Exchange has declined to $40,000. 

Why should not those Paris designers wear themselves 

out planning ultra-bizarre women's hosiery? See what an aw- 
ful lot of it has to be on view with the very latest gowns. 

Despite the fact that experience should teach them bet- 
ter, New York newspapers continue to demand that members 
of the Presidential Cabinet resign. Wonder is, they don't. 

"Lovers are lunatics," said a serious alienist the other 

day. And from the moonlit flower bordered walks and from 
every corner of the land came the answer : "So are alienists." 

Some people are wondering if the fact that we are to 

have a new currency bill is going to make currency any easier 
to get or any easier to hang on to when we do get it. It would 
be shameful to wake them up. 

The impression grows that Mid-West cities are some hot 

towns despite the cooling off influence morality investigations 
are supposed to work. Meanwhile good old Golden Gate 
seems pretty good to some of us. 



New York newspapers are one in declaring that Justice 

Gerard, as Ambassador to Germany, is perfectly acceptable. 
Of course, the Justice is a- New Yorker, and so they ought to 
know. 

And now the British government is investigating the 

efforts of the American beef trust to control their market. It 
looks like the early arrival of a world alliance against that ever- 
present giant. 

Dr. Rucker advises blondes to avoid the bright sunlight, 

as it is rich in chemical ether waves. Still, it might save the 
trouble of using that other stuff which comes in brown bottles 
if they did try the ether waves. 

Talking about that old story of Mahomet and the moun- 
tain, a town in Montana recently moved bodily to the railroad 
because the road failed to come to it. Times have not changed 
since Mahomet tried the impossible. 

A writer complains that when they are providing picnics 

for the enjoyment of children they might throw in a few for the 
enjoyment of adults. Trouble is, the grown-ups usually show 
a failing for enjoying them too much. 

Turkish trousers are proposed for women, and mean- 
time men are permitted to go on worrying about the everlasting 
creases in theirs without any hope of any one ever starting 
something in their direction which will save many a tailor's 
bill. 

It seems to take a mighty long time to complete all those 

surrejoiners and replies and notes which have passed and re- 
passed as a result of that little Anti-Alien Land Law in Cali- 
fornia. Just what did our William and their Chinda forget to 
say, anyway? 

Just for being romantic enough to tell an actress that 

she would always be a beautiful dream to him, has cost an 
English nobleman $250,000. Had he called her wife, he might 
have found her to be a nightmare, so he probably considers that 
he got off pretty light. 

London is shocked because a few Americans have dared 

to play golf in their shirt-sleeves — this on top of the English 
horror of shirt-sleeve diplomacy. Dear old England, sad in- 
deed is it that we must shock you. yet you seem to welcome 
our dollars just the same. 

A Mississippi judge has decided that a razor carried by 

a negro is not a weapon but a toilet article. Still Sambo has 
frequently had a rather strange idea as to how much of an- 
other's facial adornment it was necessary to remove in order 
to complete a satisfactory toilet. 

The etiquette smashing heat in the Middle West the 

past few weeks seems to make it apparent that there must soon 
be some smashing changes in the traditions which seem to make 
it necessary that men remain hampered with clothing while 
the gentler sex glory in their ever-decreasing robes. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 




m> 



OMMENT 



Eugene N. Foss, Governor of the 

Is It Bluff? State of Massachusetts, according 

to the San Francisco Examiner has 

announced that he intends to transfer the bulk of his business 

across the border into the Dominion of Canada. 

"Ridiculous tariff legislation" is the excuse which Governor 
Foss makes for the move. Is Governor Foss merely bluffing? 

Or is Governor Foss one of those peevish gentlemen who 
believes that his business, stimulated heretofore by a purely 
artificial encouragement, cannot stand up under the necessity 
of a struggle for competitive supremacy by the means of con- 
stant attention to the increase in economy and efficiency ? 

Considered in the light of reason, the statement of Governor 
Foss simply means that he is opposed to the conduct of the 
business of the country according to the laws of Nature. He 
has the audacity to declare that the only way in which business 
can be encouraged is to give to it a continuance of the legisla- 
tive and purely artificial encouragement of the past. 

He has declared, by his declaration against the tariff pro- 
posals of the Administration, that he is in favor of continuing 
to force the people of the United States to bolster the industries 
cf the country and to dig down deeper every year to pay the 
price of continually advancing commodities. 

Governor Foss pretends to be in favor of Reciprocity. He 
asserts that the Republican policy of trade exclusion is wrong 
and that the Democratic policy of President Wilson is wrong. 

Yet Governor Foss is aware that it is utter foolishness for 
the United States to talk reciprocity with Canada. They turned 
us down once and will do so again. And reciprocity such as he 
pretends to favor is equally impossible and foolish, and he 
knows it. 

The fact is that Governor Foss has simply come forward with 
the same old bluff which has been made every time there has 
been any proposal to reduce the "protection" of American in- 
dustries. It is a bluff because his statement that present tariff 
legislation is such as to force American industries to Canada 
is utter nonsense. 

All of Governor Foss' talk about the blessings of reciprocity 
and what he would like to see done in lieu of present tariff 
legislation is, in the latest improved diction of the San Fran- 
cisco Examiner, "bunk." 

If Governor Foss is unwilling that the people should be given 
a square deal henceforth, and that the cost of commodities to 
them should be reduced instead of increased, then he does well 
to move to Canada. While his withdrawal is regretted, this 
country is big enough and opportunities are big enough to 
stand the shock and to rise above it. 

Those who cry reciprocity at this time are merely quibblers. 
They know that they do not want it any more than they want 
low tariff. Why can they not come out into the open and fight 
square? They know that the Underwood Tariff is right. And 
they know that they cannot advance a sound argument against 
it. Then why do they not own up that they do not care a hang 
for efficiency, the consumers' rights, or anything save legisla- 
tive coddling? 

We are rather surprised that Governor Foss should lay him- 
self open to criticism such as his unmistakable subterfuge will 
bring upon him. It is such tactics that bring upon what is 
called "Big Business" the odium which President Wilson is 
endeavoring to remove by his correction of existing evils which 
hamper business. 




It is sometimes amusing to contem- 
Those Gambling Clubs, plate the sudden moves of those in- 
tended to be protectors of the pub- 
lic peace and guardians of the morality of the community. 

Knowing full well that there were in existence in this 
city places known as "Social Clubs," the authorities have per- 
mitted those places to exist, and day after day to be so con- 
ducted as to be a menace to public peace and morality. 

Why? Was it necessary that the authorities should wait un- 
til some person who had been rendered terrible injury should 
register a complaint? Is there any difference between a so- 
called Chinese gambling den and a so-called social club whose 
members are men of our own race? 

That the police have made raids and taken hundreds to the 
Hall of Justice, as they did on Saturday night last, is no credit 
to that organization. No one deserves credit for sudden moral 
awakening. 

It has been charged that the whole Police Department in the 
city of San Francisco is rotten and corrupt. If there is a 
shadow of truth in such a statement, then it is time investiga- 
tions should not stop with captains and sergeants. Let the 
office of the Chief of Police be investigated. Let Mr. District 
Attorney Fickert begin that investigation at once. 

It might seem paradoxical to see the man who recently sat 
beside the prosecuting attorney at the trial of Taylor and Mc- 
Phee defending himself against charges equally as bad. But if 
there is any chance of laxity in the office of Chief White, it is 
the people's right to know about it, and to demand that he be 
given another vocation to follow. 

These charges and insinuations against departments trusted 
with the preservation of law and order and the prevention of 
crime are malodorous. Stirring the cess-pools of the city's life 
never is particularly pleasing or a good advertisement for a 
city. 

But the fact remains that there have been in existence cer- 
tain places which should not be allowed to exist — places for 
whose existence there is not the chance for excuse. And some- 
one is to blame for that state of affairs. 

Who is to blame? Let the District Attorney find out, and 
lose no time about it either. The finding out must not be left 
to the Police Commissioners. 

Without attempting to express an opinion as to whether or not 
the police are guilty of having deliberately protected the gam- 
bling clubs, the thought occurs that our laws which permit of 
the existence of such places are more to blame than anything 
else. 

We Caiifornians have been busily engaged in advancing cer- 
tain legislation in the name of progress. A great majority of 
that legislation is not only unnecessary, but is iniquitous. Yet 
we permit certain technicalities to exist in our laws whereby 
such low "joints" as these social clubs are enabled to exist and 
be responsible for social ruin. 

This latest farce is but another argument against mock civic 
righteousness and moral uplift pretense. Let the lately formed 
Judicial League leave the department of police judges alone 
iong enough to get at the root of such matters as this, and thus 
accomplish some real reform. It is then that we will have bet- 
ter social conditions, and that our police will be real guardians 
of public peace and morality. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



Because President Wilson signed 

Sundry Civil the Sundry Civil Appropriations 

Appropriations. Bill, he has been condemned by 

• those who are ever willing to seize 

upon any pretext, however flimsy, to throw discredit upon him. 

The clause in the bill relating to labor and farming which 
has been termed by some class legislation, when viewed by 
those whose minds are not obscured by partisanship, seems to 
be less dangerous and unprincipled than we are assured it is. 

The Saturday Evening Post does not consider the argument 
of class legislation worth bothering with. Speaking of the . 
railroads and the Sherman Law, the Post says : 

"Their exactly uniform rates between given points could not 
possibly be reached except by joint agreements in restraint of 
trade, and in spite of the Anti-Trust Law. The Government 
tacitly sanctions this violation because it dare not do otherwise 
— knowing that unbridled competition in railroad rates would 
be ruinous. Why is not exempting the railroads, in this re- 
spect, from the Sherman Law class executive action of the 
most vicious sort?" 

Although President Wilson says that the labor and farming 
proviso is wrong in principle, the New York Globe (Rep.) says : 
says: 

"No issue relating to boycotting or intimidating or the like 
is involved by the proviso. These are just as illegal as before. 
The only exemption sought is one that, in fact, has always ex- 
isted — namely, that men should not be prosecuted for associat- 
ing themselves in organizations 'having in view,' to use the pre- 
cise language of the proviso, 'the increasing of wages, shorten- 
ing of hours or bettering the conditions of labor, or for any act 
done in furtherance thereof not in itself unlawful.' " 

After all, to save any repetition of this present trouble, it 
would seem that there is need of a measure whereby the Presi- 
dent may veto objectionable sections without endangering the 
whole bill. 

3ST 

Like most large cities, San Fran- 

Smoke Nuisance. cisco has come face to face with a 

serious problem which needs the 

immediate attention of all who arc concerned in the welfare 

of the city as well as the general health of the community. 

The seriousness of the smoke nuisance is something which 
the authorities cannot afford to disregard. It is well known 
that the soot sent up from the hundreds of chimneys through- 
out the city is conducive to tuberculosis. Further, the sight of 
a pall of smoke hanging over us is anything but beautiful. 

The action of the Commonwealth Club, determined upon at 
its recent monthly meeting, is one which is worthy the com- 
mendation of all lovers of the city beautiful. It is worthy their 
support — their active support. 

The suggestion of the Club that the city enact an ordinance 
placing a fine upon all factory and hotel owners who permit of 
the imperfect combustion of coal and fuel oils, is a worthy one. 
There is no necessity of the air being filled with black soot and 
gases and the city at large should know it and measures should 
be taken at once to make that knowledge sufficiently impres- 
sive as to prevent a continuance of the nuisance. 

The News Letter has urged from time to time that serious 
effort be made to rid our streets of the filth and litter which is 
allowed to collect and be blown around to the discomfort and 
ill-health of the people. This nuisance, together with that of 
smoke, are two important lines of effort which must be given 
attention if we will make our city really beautiful health' and 
inviting. 



"It is reasonably certain that the 
Reasonable Argument, municipal ownership bonds cannot 
be marketed if authorized. Then 
why commit the folly of making the securities already offered 
still more unsalable by conveying the impression to possible 
investors that San Francisco is recklessly going the pace ?" 

The above appeared on the editorial page of one of our local 
dailies this week. Considered in the light of known facts, the 
question is one which the taxpayers of this city will do well 
to keep before them when reading and hearing the roseate 
promises of those who advocate placing another bond issue on 
the market. 

The one big reason for any large extension of street railway 
facilities at this time is the fact that there is a grave doubt 
as to the ability of the present facilities to cope with the de- 
mand for transportation in 1915. The municipal authorities 
know that this problem exists and the peopla know it. 

Therefore, the only possible excuse for an attempt on the 
part of the authorities to incur debt for the construction of new 
lines of street railway would be that such construction would 
relieve the situation as far as the coming Exposition is con- 
cerned. 

But the report of the engineer employed by the city to pre- 
pare the plans for which a bond issue of $3,437,000 is contem- 
plated does not serve to alter the fact that this city will not be 
able to adequately handle the great crowds in attendance at 
the 1915 Exposition. . 

Then there is no excuse for asking the taxpayers of San 
Francisco to injure the chances of disposing of the bonds and ' 
securities already placed upon the market by authorizing the 
new street railway extension program. 

The News Letter has seen fit to 
Excessive Criticism. condemn those who have sought to 

discredit President Wilson in con- 
nection with the momentarily sensational disclosures of former 
District Attorney McNab. Without any well founded reason, 
certain people and newspapers have commented upon the action 
of the President in a manner to imply that the latter was re- 
miss in his duty as Chief Magistrate of the nation. 

Last week the Federal Grand Jury presented a report to 
Judge Van Fleet which contained some caustic comment upon 
both the President and the Department of Justice at Wash- 
ington. Judge Van Fleet, with every warrant possible, rebuked 
the Grand Jury, and refused to permit the filing of the report. 

It appears that the Grand Jury, in censuring the President, 
certainly went beyond its province. After examining the facts 
in the case, it does not seem that there is any possible reason 
for the "sadness and regret" with which the Grand Jury viewed 
the recall of McNab and Herrington. 

But whether or not there was reason for regret because of 
the Washington attitude in the matter, it was not the function 
of the Grand Jury to place itself on record as taking either side 
in the controversy. The people have the facts of the case as 
well as the Grand Jury, and there is little doubt but that they 
are satisfied that there is no reason to believe that justice will 
suffer, particularly in the hands of the men whom we have been 
informed will handle the prosecutions from now on. Their 
appointment is in itself sufficient guarantee that President Wil- 
son and the Department of Justice at Washington are desirous 
of removing any and all doubt as to the ultimate conclusion of 
the cases in question. And, instead of attempting to go beyond 
its province, the Grand Jury should prepare to render all the 
assistance in its power to Jhe new District Attorney and his 
assistants. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



GO AHEAD, MR. PRESIDENT! 

CURRENCY REFORM, TARIFF REFORM AND OTHER RECOGNITIONS OF THE 
NEEDS OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE MARK YOU AS THE PEOPLE'S PRESIDENT. 



THE PEOPLE'S PRESIDENT. 

The News Letter ventures the opinion that, were the issues 
represented in the proposed tariff and currency reform measure 
fairly and squarely presented to the mass of the people of the 
United States, ninety per cent of the intelligent voters of the 
country would echo the mandate, "Go ahead, Mr. President." 
On the field of Gettysburg, where hundreds and thousands of 
men who had fought one another fifty years ago met again in 
peaceful brotherhood, President Wilson said: 

"These venerable men crowding here to this famous field 
have set us a great example. They were willing to die that 
the nation might live. But their task is done. Their day is 
turned into evening. They look to us to perfect what they es- 
tablished. Their work is handed on to us, to be done in an- 
other way, but not in another spirit. Our day is not over; it 
is upon us in full tide." 

Those were noble words expressing a high and lofty senti- 
ment. We reiterate: "Go ahead, Mr. President!" 

In his address to Congress, in which he introduced the sub- 
ject of Currency Reform, the President assured the members 
of that body, and the people of the United States, that the new 
iaws which he proposed to give his personal attention to in the 
interests of those he was supposed to serve, would mean that 
the control of the system of banking and of issue must be pub- 
lic and not private, "must be vested in the government itself, 
so that banks may be the instruments, not the masters of busi- 
ness and of individual enterprise and initiative." 

Commenting upon the proposals with refeience to the trans- 
fer of that control, Collier's Weekly asks : "But who will con- 
trol the government?" 

Probably the best answer to that question is contained in the 
following statement made by the Secretary :>f State : "The Cur- 
rency Bill is written," says Mr. Bryan, "from the standpoint of 
the people, rather than the standpoint of the financiers." Mr. 
Bryan further states that the only ones who can possibly offer 
objection are those who "dispute the right of the people to 
issue through their government the money which the people 
need." 

Again we say: "Go ahead, Mr. President." Woodrow Wil- 
son, upon his acceptance of the people's highest gift, and upon 
taking the oath which bound him to the service of the people 
during his tenure of office, became duty bound to correct those 
evils which, by their existence, denied any rights they were 
entitled to enjoy by virtue of the great principles of our Con- 
stitution. 

And President Wilson, by being big enough to realize that 
the "tyrannies of business lie within the field of credit," and 
big enough to endeavor to make those tyrannies impossible, 
has proven himself to be the kind of man which his speech at 
Gettysburg marks him as — a President who touches a respon- 
sive chord in the hearts of the people whose servant he is. 

That there are features in the bill which are likely to meet 
with considerable opposition is true. Nevertheless, the main 
principles are such as to win the confidence of the mass of the 
people. And it would seem that there is sufficient in those 
principles to satisfy the bankers themselves. The President 
declares that the proposal is to, by virtue of new currency and 
banking laws, remove certain evils- which shackle and trammel 
business, restore freedom of enterprise, and a currency which 



is elastic and not rigid as now, so that it may be responsive to 
sound credit. 
By all means, Go Ahead, Mr. President. 

If President Wilson has done nothing else worth while, he 
has at least succeeded in making Congress achieve. He has 
imparted, by his example and his conscientious attendance 
upon his duties as a servant of the people as well as their Chief 
Magistrate, a considerable momentum to the government busi- 
ness. In short, President Wilson's administration thus far has 
been so decidedly successful that it has prompted even the 
forces of the Republican party to careful and exhaustive 
scrutiny. 

In the language of the Springfield Republican, "the fierce 
outbursts of Republican criticism of late bespeak indirectly 
Republican acknowledgment of the President's success." 
Go ahead, Mr. President! 

There can be no doubt but that the prophecies of the Republi- 
can party as to the woeful result of reducing the tariff have re- 
acted in favor of the Administration. 

The opposition within the ranks of the Democratic party it- 
self, to certain features of the tariff reductions was overcome 
by this man who is demonstrating that he is fully aware of the 
tact that he is the one big lobbyist of the American people. 

Both of these facts have caused despair to spread throughout 
the ranks of the stand-pat forces, and we are glad it has come. 
We are proud of our President, and we believe that the great 
body of the voting public is satisfied and proud and willing to 
see him continue to sweep all before him in his great fight for 
their betterment. 

. The Caminetti-Diggs affair was taken advantage of by critics 
of the President, and a great stench was stirred up in which 
some of the most active hoped to involve the Administration to 
such an extent as to throw upon it a lasting discredit. 

But President Woodrow Wilson, the people's President, rose 
to the occasion, ordered a speedy trial at San Francisco, de- 
manded that there should be no attempts to stay justice, and 
that, if such had been attempted, it should be effectually 
disclosed. 

The whole affair has been threshed out, and the President has 
vindicated himself and his administration. Once more have 
those who would disparage an administration which is doing 
such great work been "sat upon and badly squelched." 

In the words of the London Daily News, this country has 
found in its President "a man who means everything he says 
and who has won the confidence of the country." 

In his disclosures as to the fact that insidious work was be- 
ing done by those opposing his tariff reductions, President 
Wilson has apparently rendered the country an inestimable ser- 
vice. Further, in this respect, he has again made Congress 
achieve. He has caused no little activity among them in that 
he has caused them to turn over every stone under which may 
be found anything which might suggest the presence of an in- 
sidious influence upon the people's representatives. 

Again we say, Go ahead, Mr. President! We believe that 
you will demonstrate effectually that our government must be 
of and by the people, and that from the people alone shall it 
take its mandates. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 








The bill boards advocates of this city are entirely too 

modest in their demands. Why do they put a twenty-foot limit 
to the height of the boards that they want, by special permis- 
sion, to erect along our principal thoroughfares? There are so 
many near-sighted people in San Francisco and vicinity that 
twenty-foot billboards seem really too small for the purpose 
they are used for. Why not make the boards fifty or seventy- 
five feet high? They would then be large enough for the ar- 
tistic sign painters to make a respectable showing upon; and 
in addition, they would be able to hide up some of our new 
buildings from view, and thus preserve their messages to the 
general public of "Use Bunkom's Soap — Good for the Teeth," 
or "Smoke Sultan's Dream Cigarettes," "Eat Slopsy's Soup," 
etc., intact. When it is further taken into consideration that 
they only ask to put up about six miles of these "marvelously 
beautiful signs," these artistic masterpieces in yellow, green, 
black and scarlet, it seems that the Supervisors must lack a- 
proper sense of the artistic to cavil at granting these special 
permits. 

Can it be that the people of San Francisco and the authori- 
ties of this brave Western city are deficient in the knowledge 
of true art? It would seem so, to hear the uproar that they 
make about the dainty little bill boards every now and again. 

Although there is a notice in the Tax Collector's office to 

the effect that paper money — gold notes, silver certificates, 
bank notes, etc. — will not be received, and this form of finan- 
cial medium has been classed as filthy lucre by Treasurer Mc- 
Dougald, there has been up to date no indication of any one 
leaving large packages of this same lucre lying around loose 
hereabouts. On the contrary, there is just the same animated 
rush to get hold of some of the above slandered paper money 
as before the Treasurer put his ban upon it. Strange how 
some people act, anyway; here the City Treasurer has told 
them that their money is soiled and full of germs, but they 
still hang onto it as if it were just the most precious thing in 
the world. 

If San Franciscans want to provide interesting entertain- 
ment for the newly created Women's Justice League which 
sends its watchers to the city's police courts, all they have to 
do is to urge our police judges to adopt the rule recently made 
by a Washington police judge who, to decide whether a man 
is or is not intoxicated, tests him by making him walk a chalk 
line. Such a method of testing the unfortunates in local police 
courts would be pleasant diversion both for judges, court at- 
taches and the women who are now so intensely interested in 
what is probably more or less stale most of the time. At the 
same time it is likely to be a good way to teach the men to 
practice self-control. 

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat says that the kick of the 

Missouri mule against free trade in sugar cannot be called in- 
sidious because a mule's kick is always "straightforward and 
direct." We always thought it was rather of the backward 
variety, and so all-fired unexpected that it could not be 
termed anything save — well, Pat said that you must always 
consider where it came from, and he wasn't paying any com- 
pliment to the mule, either. 



In one of last Sunday's papers appeared a news item 

under the startling caption, "Rival Women's Clubs in Huff." 
The news contained was not only startling — it was almost in- 
creditable. With the advent of women into the political field, 
we have been almost compelled to believe that such things as 
"huffs and petty squabbles" would be an impossibility. We 
have been told of the elevation resultant from the divine in- 
fluence of the heretofore gentler sex. Are we to be disillu- 
sioned? Are we to believe that a woman has actually attempted 
to adopt man's political methods in an effort, as this news item 
tells us, to "gobble up" a rival organization? It would indeed 
be a pity were such to be the case. And the woman charged 
with the attempted gobbling is said to be a Progressive. And 
Oakland, of all places, is the scene of the "huff." I do not 
want to be placed in the "I told you so" class,' but if this re- 
port is to be relied upon, there seems to be leason for the con- 
clusion that women will love playing politics about as well as 
do men, and the methods of doing so are not likely to be much 
improved upon. 

Again some of San Francisco's society has been stung. 

All it requires is to look like ready money or a real live count 
— they seem to love to fall for the polished rascals who sud- 
denly appear among us from time to time. One would think 
that they would be just a little bit wiser from past experiences, 
but San Francisco apparently sfill looks good to society bunko 
artists. And the fellows without polish or craving for the 
social whirl who daily warm the benches of Union Square and 
elsewhere in neighborhoods where society loves to amuse itself, 
laughs right merrily. One thing is certain, San Francisco 
society is game. It never lays down — it is always up and ready 
for the next one. But it is rather hard that those who have no 
aversion to pick the pockets of the bon ton or to pass bogus 
drafts and air bogus titles should pick this good old town as 
such a "good thing." It isn't flattering in the least, and it seems 
that, after all, the limitations of our own little Four Hundred 
are sufficient to satisfy all our social longings and amusement 
without inviting others to join us unless we know them mighty 
well. 

Just how senseless some of the new modern laws can be 

is demonstrated by the recent example of the application of the 
new Wisconsin marriage law. A woman, fifty-four years old, 
sought to marry a man fifty-six years old, and was forced to 
bring her mother, eighty-one years, to give consent. This was 
because the new law requires that at least one of the contract- 
ing parties have the consent of one parent to the marriage. And 
the woman in this case was a grandmother. And here in Cali- 
fornia we thought we had gone the limit when one of our bril- 
liant State Senators proposed to regulate the size of bird cages 
and another wanted to muzzle barbers. Posterity will have no 
need of comic supplements in its newspapers. The history of 
the growth of legislation in 1913 should provide all the wit and 
humor necessary. 

The records of the office of the State Board of Health 

show that Cupid is at work this year with even greater energy 
than he displayed in 1912. So far this year, 15,066 brides 
were made more or less happy, as against 14,197 for 1912, 
showing that the matrimonial "bug" is still buzzing around as 
usual. This is a good showing, and as the divorces asked for, 
anted, do not come to anywhere near the above figures,, it 
may safely be stated that married life in California is proving 
a verv attractive proposition. At any rate, according to present 
indications, there will be approximately 66,000 people this year 
who will find out for themselves. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



W& Mmi/for qf-ltrnfa Mho/ 



The Day of the Slav. 
Those who profess an intimate knowledge of the workings 
of European international affairs, declare that there is every 
evidence of the early dominance of the Slav. There can be 
no doubt but that the Balkan League of States is the work of 
Russian statesmen, and in demanding that the differences be- 
tween them should be settled by arbitration and not by war, 
which Russia made in her note last month, was a decided ser- 
vice to mankind. Just how effectual will be the advice of Rus- 
sia is, of course, a matter of doubt, as the various States seem 
more or less disposed to continue in their former course. 
Mr. Lovat Fraser, writing in the London Daily Mail, says: 
"Two things alone stand in the way of a realization of the 
Pan-Slav ideals. The first, which requires no emphasis, is that 
the Slavs have never found the secret of the sea. The second 
is the uncertainty of Russian policy. Russia has never been 
able to make up her mind whether her destinies lie chiefly in 
Europe or in Asia. Peter the Great opened a window in Europe. 
His successors turned their faces eastward, and came to tem- 
porary grief in the process. Pan-Slavism is European in origin 
and association, and so long as Russia looks across the Urals, 
the races of Mid-Europe can breathe more freely. There are 
indications nowadays that they may not do so for long." 



Greece on the Main Line. 
"One of the most important gains to Greece from the present 
war with Turkey is the acquisition of territory in Macedonia 
long desired, through which to build a railway connecting 
Greece with the transcontinental line that runs from Vienna to 
Constanra. The distance to be covered is less than one hundred 
miles," says the New York Nation's correspondent located 
at Athens. "One meets at every turn Greek soldiers from 
the United States, who are very eager to air their English 
vocabulary whenever they meet a 'fellow-countryman.' There 
are in all about 80,000 of them who came to fight for their 
fatherland, and he is the exception who does not intend to re- 
turn to America." 



The Money Famine and Armaments. 

"The new German and Prussian loans, aggregating more 
than eleven millions, have failed, and but half the required 
amount has been subscribed. This is a remarkable event, and 
it may have a remarkable effect upon German policy," says 
the Daily Mail. "It proves that there is not enough money to 
'go round' even now. How much less will there be if Germany 
spends a further fifty millions of capital on the equipment re- 
quired by her new Army Bill ? Even the greatest of empires 
may be taught by this suggestive incident that it must 'cut its 
coat according to its cloth,' and thus out of evil of the money 
crisis good may come. 

"The failure of the loan is from many points of view not a 
matter for tears. The increase of armaments on all sides is 
largely responsible for the money crisis, and now the money 
crisis begins to threaten the advance of armaments. In the 
past, the German Michael, as an American writer has cleverly 
observed, has flourished in virtue of constant subcutaneous in- 
jections of French and American capital. But French financiers 
are face to face with a French loan for forty millions. Ameri- 
can financiers will have more than they can do to meet the re- 
quirements of their own railways. Thus Germany cannot bor- 
row abroad the money which she cannot obtain at home. It 
really looks as though sheer financial pressure might at last 
check the race in armaments which is exhausting the energy 
of Europe, and might thus assuage the rivalry of the nations." 



Artificiality of Civilization. 
Price Collier, in his "Germany and the Germans," has some- 
ing to say which seems to be finding place in the minds of most 
observers who have expressed themselves or studied the Ger- 
mans of to-day. Says Mr. Collier: 



"Many of the weaknesses, much of the strength of Germany 
are- artificial. They have not grown, they have been forced. 
The very barrenness of the soil, the ring of enemies, the soft 
moral and social textures of the population, have, so their little 
knot of rulers think, made necessary these harsh, artificial 
forcing methods. 

"The outstanding proof of the artificiality of this civilization 
is its powerlessness to propagate. Germans translated from 
their hot-house civilization to other countries cease to be Ger- 
mans; and nowhere in the world outside Germany is German 
civilization imitated, liked or adopted. The German is non- 
plussed to find the Pole in the East, the Frenchman in the 
West, the Dane in the North, scoffing at his alte Kultur, as 
he calls it, and he is irritated beyond measure by the German 
from America, who returns to the Vaterland ' to criticise, to 
sneer and to thank God that he is an American, not a German 
citizen. Germans become English citizens, no Englishmen be- 
come Germans; millions of Germans have become Americans, 
no Americans become Germans. No other population would 
be amenable to the Prussian methods that have made Germany, 
nor is there anywhere in the world a people demanding Prus- 
sian methods, while there are millions under the Prussian yoke- 
who hate it. The German rhetoric to the effect that Germany 
is to save the world by Teutonizing the world is laughable. 
Prussia is the ventriloquist behind this half-hearted boast." 



Two Views of a Demonstration. 

Here are two views of the Hyde Park demonstration against 
the Welsh Church Bill. Says the London Times : "The great 
demonstration against the Welsh Church Bill on Saturday was 
beyond doubt one of the most significant events in its magni- 
tude, its simplicity and its earnestness of purpose that Hyde 
Park has ever seen. The note of simplicity and determination 
was well struck in the simple, clear-cut resolution which was 
put and carried at the various platforms : 'We will not have 
our Church dismembered and four of its dioceses disestablished 
and disendowed.' " 

Says the Manchester Guardian: "One strolled into the Park 
in the early afternoon with the feeling that something tremen- 
dous was about to happen. But it was impossible to keep up 
the sense of impending tragedy very long. For there under the 
trees in front of the tea room sat the Bishop of Bangor and 
some fellow-churchmen, with dishes of municipal watercress 
before them, looking just as happy as if they had been taking 
tea on the lawn at Glyngarth. Close by a group of four Welsh 
clergy sat with their chairs tilted back, smoking and obviously 
cracking jokes. There were Welsh churchmen and church- 
women, young men and maidens, on every side, looking for all 
the world as if they were thoroughly enjoying it all. Surely no 
company of doomed martyrs ever went to their fate in such 
excellent spirits as these Welsh Protestants." 



"Say, boss, can I get off this afternoon about half-past 

two?" "Whose funeral is it to be this time, James?" "Well, 
to be honest, boss, the way the papers have it doped out it 
looks like it's going to be the home team's again." — St. Louis 
Republic. 




MACKIE & CO. 
1SL.AY, SCOTLAND 



Never in Bulk 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 

•tiNTt Pacific Co»«t 314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 




"Isobel." 

A story of simple plot, yet full of suspense — a story that 
really interests us in the details of action and adventure, while 
it rouses far more than the usual sympathy for people caught 
in a mesh of circumstances — that is the kind of tale that James 
Oliver Curwood has given us in his romance of the Far North 
entitled "Isobel." Every emotion in the story rings true; every 
word and act is marked by the sincerity of men who live amid 
constant hardship and with death as an ever-present possibility. 
One thousand miles north of civilization, loneliness isn't a mere 
sentiment, but a terror that may bring madness. Friendship is 
hard-knit, and a woman, if she means anything at all to a man, 
means everything. 

Two men, both members of the Royal Northwest Mounted 
Police, are quartered at a lonely post on Hudson Bay. Sergeant 
McVeigh is obliged to go south for medicines and letters, de- 
spite the fact that his companion, Pelletier, is in danger of dying 
from privation and the terrible strain of solitude in the Arctic 
night. The men have been specially commissioned to capture 
Scotty Deane, a man accused of murder, but McVeigh is obliged 
to report failure. On his way back he meets a woman drag- 
ging a sledge side by side with dogs. On the sledge is a long 
box, evidently a coffin, and she explains that she is taking the 
dead body of her husband south for burial. McVeigh, starved 
for the sight of a woman's face, feels like worshiping her. 
Gently he makes her understand his homage and his hunger for 
companionship. He offers to accompany her, and that night 
they make camp together. In the morning he finds that she has 
gone, and gone also are his weapons. She is Isobel, wife of 
Scotty Deane, and Deane himself has lain in the box alive. But 
the woman to whom McVeigh has opened his heart so fully has 
trusted him: she has left a note expressing her faith that he 
will not follow. It so happens, however, that his worst enemy, 
hot upon the trail of Deane, comes upon him, and in order to 
keep the fugitives from falling into worse hands, McVeigh is 
obliged to follow and arrest them. Then, out on the Barrens, 
the emotions of years are crowded into a few moments. Isobel 
turns in hatred and disgust from the man she has trusted, but 
McVeigh by the sheer honesty of his nature wins the confidence 
of her and of her husband, and brings back the look of faith 
into her eyes. When he has senl the pursuers about their 
business, he lets Deane and Isobel go. 

Meanwhile Pelletier has had a visitor, a man who describes 
himself as a seaman trom a whaler. He speaks callously of an 
Eskimo woman whom he has left to die in an igloo thirty miles 
away. Pelletier, suspecting for sufficient reasons that the 
woman is white, attempts to arrest the man, who in the ensuing 
struggle is slain. Then Pelletier, after a long battle with cold 
and weakness, reaches the igloo and finds in it a white girl- 
child. The child saves the man's sanity, as he has saved its 
life, and the reader finds himself responding to a familiar, emo- 
tion in a new way. 

McVeigh's friendly capture of Deane and Pelletier's rescue 
of a child are the basic incidents of a narrative that never 
slacks in its action, and never lacks strength- of motive to make 
the action vital. The fight with Eskimos, who have sheltered 
the little girl and are now determined to win her back, the dra- 
matic reappearance of Deane. his death, Isobel's sickness and 
subsequent disappearance, McVeigh's long and finally success- 
ful search for her, his encounter with his old enemy — these are 
incidents full of the reality of suffering, of tense feeling, and 
of physical effort. In natural sequence they bring conclusive 
evidence of Deane's innocence, and prove Isobel the mother of 
the little girl. As a piece of condensed, vigorous story-telling, 
"Isobel" surpasses Mr. Curwood's earlier romance, "Flower 
of the North," which it equals in mystery and in picturesque- 
ness of detail. 



Political Parties and Practical Politics" (Scribners.) Along 
with a large proportion of men, they have been able to gather 
trom the newspapers and the political talk of the initiated only 
unrelated fragments of information. Often, from no lack of 
intelligence, from the very intricacies of the subject, their 
minds resemble tables on which these fragments lie heaped like 
the disordered pieces of a picture puzzle. And as one of those 
geniuses for piecing such pictures together, Mr. Ray builds into 
its unity the vast political complexity — you see just how it 
grew up, and comprehend the manifold relations of the entire 
apparatus. 

The book is divided into four parts. The first, "Present Day 
National Parties," defines a political party, describes a party 
platform with the help of the Democratic and Republican plat- 
forms of 1912, and discusses third parties with special refer- 
ence to the Progressive and Socialist parties. 

Part two is called "Nominating Methods," and discusses 
nominations, from those for the smallest local offices to those 
for president and vice-president. Part three is headed "Cam- 
paigns and Elections," and has to do with the machinery of the 
party, national, State and local. 

Part four is headed "The Party in Power." It is concerned 
with the spoils system, with the measures of civil-service re- 
form, with the machine and the boss, with responsibility of 
public officers, and with methods of recalling them. The last 
three chapters in this final division deal with practical politics 
in legislative evils, such as immunity laws, the initiative and 
referendum, the "people's lobby," etc. 



"The Inhumanity of Socialism." 
The title of the recently announced work by Edward F. 
Adams has been changed from "The Case Against Socialism" 
to "The Inhumanity of Socialism," for the reason that it has 
been noticed that this former title has already been used. The 
author has this to say concerning his position regarding 
Socialism : "I am opposed to Socialism because of its inhu- 
manity; because it saps the vitality of the human race, which 
has no vitality to spare; because it lulls to indolence those who 
must struggle to survive; because the theories of good men 
who are enthralled by its delusions are made the excuse of the 
wicked, who would rather plunder than work; because it stops 
enterprise, promotes laziness, exalts inefficiency, inspires 
hatred, checks production, assures waste and instills into the 
souls of the unfortunate and the weak, hopes impossible of 
fruition, whose inevitable blasting will add to the bitterness of 
their lot." 

This book will be published in the near future by Paul Elder 
& Company, San Francisco. 



For the Suffragist. 
Women who wish to prepare themselves for the judicious 
use of the ballot should read P. Orman Ray's "Introduction to 




A TEASPOONFUL 



In a Tureen 
of Soup. 



Is Appetizing. 



LEA s PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

The Universal Popularity 
of LEA & PERRINS' 
SAUCE is based on 
Qualities which no other 
table sauce possesses. 

Gives Zest to Appetite on Roasts, 
Chops. Steaks, Game, Salads, Fish, 
Gravies, Soups, etc. sou »j Grocin 

Ereryvture. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



PARIS IN 1913 



By William V. Bryan. 

Now about Paris : I am going to tell you its faults and its 
virtues, just as they appeared to me, but its virtues are so 
numerous that I won't have much room for the faults. 

The faults consist mostly in poorly paved streets, rather un- 
kempt and narrow streets in some sections, but these may be 
found in all large cities. Its virtues so far overshadow these 
when you drive down the Champs Elysee and the Bois de Bou- 
logne that you cannot but forget them. These two boulevards 
— divided by the Arch of Triumph and La Place de la Con- 
corde, form the principal beauty spots of Paris for miles. They 
are lined on both sides with all kinds of amusement places, 
especially on the Champs Elysee. The Bois is frequented 
mostly by p ; cnic families, and here and there are beautiful re- 
sorts for refreshments, such as the Pre Catalan and the Madrid, 
two of the swellest restaurants in all Paris. Here you see real 
Parisian lite in all its stages of dress and station, and it is 
striking to note that the best people tolera:e the members of 
the female fraternity who are classed as somewhat easy-going 
because they often happen to be alone, or in pairs. The reason 
is that the underworld of Paris represent the best dressed 
women in swell places, restaurants, cafes, theatres, and not- 
withstanding their station in life, they all behave like ladies. 
They act as such, mind their own business, and for temporary 
company they are quite interesting and tolerable. Their dress 
and behavior is quite distinctive from our local women in the 
same station. Here it is coupled with fashionable outfit and eti- 
quette. At the Pre Catalan is a unique feature on the grounds 
in the way of a clean cow-barn, where milk is served "fresh 
from the cow while you wait" — 20 centimes per glass. But 
it is well to remark that the cow-stables are not largely patron- 
ized except by small children and their attendants. The 
grounds, picturesquely shaded, the out-door verandas and the 
cafe interior, seem to be the most popular, and where fashion, 
beauty, ostentation and travelers hold their sway. In the sum- 
mer time, Parisian life is best seen on the Bois between 5 and 
8 p. m. After that you can regale yourself with any kind of 
amusement, from Pathe Freres moving pictures to a quiet little 
nap — until about 10:30 p. m. That is about the time that you 
want to "get ready." I don't mean the beginning, because the 
"beginning'.' starts between twelve and one, and you want a 
front seat to see it properly, where you can secure a point of 
vantage, take one or two lemonades, and be ready for the 
"circus"" when it begins. But don't forget to tip the waiter. 
Otherwise, somebody else might have "reserved seats" where 
you are. Sometime between twelve and one a. m., at the Bal 
Tabarin the "procession" begins. It has the appearance of a 
circus parade. There are brass bands, as leaders, followed by 
men and women in novel costumes, and by six or seven wagons, 
such as we see on fete days at home on Fourth of July or Sep- 
tember 9th, but the only difference is that these wagons, or 
"floats," as we term them, are decorated with flowers and 
pretty girls, and their costume is so constituted that but little 
is left to the imagination. These performances are given every 
night, but Saturday night is the most elaborate. This kind of 
show lasts only for perhaps three-quarters of an hour. After 
that you can go home or linger until 6 a. m., and if you are so 
disposed, you can always find company. 



The Hayes-Brown Realty Company, agents for the 

Westbank Building and listers of first-class ranch and sub- 
division lands, apartments and home sites, report business bet- 
ter than usual. The senior member of the firm, whose particu- 
lar duty it is to attend to the personal inspection of all proper- 
ties handled by the firm, has been engaged in giving attention 
to this feature, and, if possible, making their offers more at- 
tractive than ever. The clientele of the firm is growing, and 
numbers investors and home-seekers from all over the coun- 
try. The Hayes-Brown Realty Company is conducted solely 
by women, who have introduced features into the realty busi- 
ness in this city which have proven to be highly satisfactory, 
and which go to prove the assertion that satisfied clients is the 
best asset any business institution can possess. 



BRING YOUR INCOME UP. 

"Don't keep your expenses down to your income. Bring 
your income up to your expenses. If you manage to live on 
what you make, you will never be spurred to better per- 
formances." 

This is the advice given by a San Franciscan who has made 
good. And why not ? It seems heresy, but it is not, when you 
come to think it over. Take the clerk on $1,200 or $1,800 a 
year. If he is one of those carefully restrained men, keeping 
not only his expenses but his wants well within his meagre in- 
come, he will remain a clerk all his life; die with that same in- 
come in his old age. 

The man who has wants beyond his income to gratify, if he 
has any merit in him, will hustle to bring in the dollars that 
he needs. Maybe he does not actually wish to live on a better 
scale than he is living, but wishes to save for investment or for 
a rainy day. He must lift his revenue or live a hand-to-mouth 
existence, or run into debt beyond his ability to pay. He be- 
comes ambitious and more industrious, more ingenious, an 
abler man all around. 

They say that contentment is better than riches, but con- 
tentment is a brake on progress. It is the discontented men 
who bestir themselves to get what they hanker for, and usually 
get it. The man who is satisfied with a small or moderate in- 
come will not get a better one. As our wants multiply, our in- 
come should increase, and vice versa. 

The philosopher was right. "Bring your income up to your 
expenses." — a. h. d. 



Mrs. Binks — Now that you have a little son and heir, I 

think you ought to stay at home evenings and think about the 
future. Mr. Binks — That's just the trouble. He raises such an 
eternal racket I have to go out to think. — Exchange. 



FOR YOUR VACATION 

FOR YOUR CAMPING TRIP 

HAVE YOUR EQUIPMENT RIGHT 

Thirty -live rears of Progressive Camp Experience enabled ua to :> — i.-i you, 
not only in the selection of an outfit, but also to advise "the places i" go for 
besl results." 

Our stock consists of every practical article reauired whether you Intend to 
visit the Springs or Journey u> Alaska. A few of the articles nom in 
demand, consisi of; 

Tents from $5.00 

Automobile tents of waterproof dilk, the very lightest tent 

made, from 7.50 

Blankets nm sh't.H> eamei.ll from 2.75 

Khaki shirts from 2.50 

Khaki pants from 1.50 

Shoes tor men and women Prom 3.50 

Haversacks, with straps, from 10 

Government Khaki Coata, 35 ;1 measure l'5 

Government meat pans, with cup. knife, fork and spoon 86 

Your Inspection invited to hundreds of other articles needful to the camper 
The Most Complete Sporting Goods House In America 

THE ELLERY ARMS COMPANY 5 %%"*". K T ET 




KNABE PIANO 

UPRIGHTS $550 up 
GRANDS $750 up 

Moderate Monthly Payments 




Kohler & Chase Bldg.. 26 OFarrell St. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, Santa Rosa.— Cafe attached. 
squabs, and shell fish to order. Moderate prices. 



Stenks, chickens, 



REDWOOD MANUFACTURERS CO. 

Water, Oil, and Wine Tanks all 
sizes and dimensions made from 
the best quality of California 
Redwood. 

811 KOHL BUILDING 

San Francisco 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



DEL MONTE NOTES. 

The beautiful weather the guests of Del Monte enjoyed over 
the Fourth of July holidays, and during the Golf Tournament, 
has continued all through the past week. Quite a number were 
out for salmon the past week. There were some fairly good 
catches, but the fishermen are all looking forward to the big 
run which is expected in a tew days. 

Del Monte has a new gasoline fishing launch fitted especially 
for this purpose, fully equipped with all necessary big fishing 
paraphernalia such as the latest rods and reels. 

Polo is again to reign at Del Monte for one week preceding 
the golf tournament. Two of the teams are already booked : 
they are the San Mateo Juniors and the team of the Third 
Squadron of the First Cavalry of the Presidio of Monterey. 
The first game will be played August 29th. 

The date for the annual fall Golf Tournament has been 
definitely set as September 6th to 13th inclusive. The tourna- 
ment this year will be known as the California State and Del 
Monte Championship Golf Tournament, and will no doubt prove 
a great drawing card and bring many crack players from dis- 
tant points of the Pacific Coast. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. F. Jaeger, the hotel man of Tucson, Ariz., 
arrived at Del Monte by motor last Friday ; they motored across 
the desert to Los Angeles, and are continuing their trip up the 
Coast, their ultimate destination being Seattle. They report a 
most wonderful trip. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Zook, of San Rafael, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
W. Slack and Miss Slack of San Francisco, are spending sev- 
eral days at Del Monte. 

Dr. and Mrs. F. W. Sawyer and family are at Del Monte for 
an indefinite stay. Dr. Sawyer is the manager of the Paso 
Robles Hot Springs. 



CASTLE CRAGS SOCIAL NOTES. 

The R. Haynes family, of Burlingame, are visiting the 
Charlie Clarks at Castle Crags. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Lee, of Boston, Mass., will spend the 
months of July and August here. Mr. and Mrs. Lee returned 
the latter part of June from a tour of the world, via San Fran- 
cisco. 

Mrs. W. H. Treat was the complimented guest at a motor 
party that was given Monday by Mrs. Easterbrook. A delight- 
ful run was made to Yreka; an early start was made from 
Castle Crags. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Lee and party enjoyed a picnic to the 
McCloud River. The trip was made by automobile. 

Messrs. M. Norton and Mr. D. R. Norton of San Francisco 
are enjoying their vacation here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Maison, of Oakland, have taken one of the log 
cabins at Castle Crags. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Wallace and Master Wallace have a suite 
in the Crocker Lodge at Castle Crags Tavern. 

Mr. William Doud, of San Francisco, won the finals in the 
tennis tournament at Castle Crags. Mr. W. H. Treat, of Shreve, 
Treat & Eacret, was the donor of a handsome silver cup. Cap- 
tain Fletcher, U. S. A., made a clever speech when he pre- 
sented this trophy to the winner. 

Miss Mary Hazel Pedlar, of San Francisco, and Miss Helen 
L. Crandall of Fresno, arrived at Castle Crags Monday, where 
they are planning to remain for three or four weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Korpman and Miss Staples are enjoying their 
outing at Castle Crags. 

The "supper dance" at Castle Crags, which followed the 
playing of the finals in the tennis tournament, was quite a suc- 
cessful affair. The table was decorated with fems and the 
wild honey-suckle. Covers were laid for twenty. Those who 
participated in the tournament attended. 



PACIFIC GROVE SOCIETY NOTES. 

M. L. Woodruff and wife, of Snelling, are making their an- 
nual visit to the Pacific Grove Hotel ; H. Hurd, the big cigar 
man of Sacramento; Mrs. Joseph Ryland and family of San 
Jose; Mrs. J. M. Wright of Sacramento; W. B. Griffith and 
family from Napa; Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Knowles of Oakland, 
with their guest, R. H. Merchant, of the same city; P. E. New- 
love of Santa Cruz, and Morgan Wollcott and wife of New 
York, are registered for the week-end. 



NOTES FROM CASA DEL KEY. 

Mrs. A. J. Francis, her sister, Mrs. R. E. McCabe, and mother, 
Mrs. C. M. Tennant, are recent arrivals. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Storey, of San Francisco, and their 
charming young daughter, are at Casa del Rey for an extended 
stay. Mr. Storey is connected with the Standard Oil Company 
in San Francisco. 

Mr. Melville Marx, one of the proprietors of the Columbia 
Theatre, in San Francisco, was at the hotel this week. 

Mrs. Eva Hunt, a popular and talented young matron from 
San Francisco, has been a guest here for the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of Berkeley motored down from 
town to spend the week-end. Mr. Miller is a retired broker, 
and was formerly connected with the D. 0. Mills Bank of 
Sacramento. 

Mrs. G. L. Olds, accompanied by her two charming daugh- 
ters, Edith and Mary, are up from Porterville. Mr. Olds is, 
the editor of the daily paper published in the prosperous little 
valley town. 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases, Pacific Building. 4th and Market streets - . 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

Tea served in Tapestry Room 
from four to six o'clock 

Special Music Fixed Price 

A DAILY SOCIAL EVENT 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Fireproof 



Rates 9l.OO and up 
F. J. McHENRY. Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

THIRTEENTH AND HARRISON STREETS, Oakland, California 
Absolutely fireproof Class A construction. Erected 
at a cost of $2,000,000. Perfect service and un- 

surpassed cuisine. Afternoon tea from 4 until 

6 o'clock. Music. 
European plan only Tariff $1.50 per day up 

Under Management of VICTOR REITER 
Electric But Meets All Trains 



BUTLER-NELKE 
ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ART 

Alcazar Theatre Building; 

MIRIAM NELKI - Director 

Dramatic Art. Elocution. Dialect. Literature, French. 

Fencing. Dancing and Make-up. Fall term begins Aug. 11th 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leave* 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely peifumed powdered leaves t» 
carry In tbe purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 

2 rove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents In stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
Ins. 17 Great Jones St.. N. T. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



Iuly 19, 1913. 



SERIES OF MUSIC MATINEES. 
Another distinguished artist who will appear at the summer 
■series of Music Matinees given at Kohler & Chase Hall under 
the auspices of Kohler & Chase this Saturday afternoon, July 
19th, will be Karl Grienauer. Mr. Grienauer is a 'cellist of 
"world-wide reputation, and his mastery of the instrument is 
•complete. Mr. Grienauer is well known to San Franciscans, as 
his first appearance here was as first 'cellist with Fritz Scheel, 
and only a short time ago he appeared in a 'cello recital which 
revealed his wonderful accomplishments in their most pro- 
nounced degree. Mr. Grienauer will play compositions by 
Saint-Saens, Popper, Verdi and Moszkowski. The exquisite 
solos of Mr. Grienauer will be augmented by several delightful 
instrumental selections to be interpreted on the Knabe Player- 
Piano and the Pipe Organ. Among these will be works by 
Moszkowski, Dolmetsch, Chaminade, Wagner and Grieg. 



Latter day religious thought traverses peculiar avenues. 

For instance, the members of the Central Presbyterian Church 
in Washington, D. C, found no fault with their place of wor- 
ship until President Wilson joined the congregation. Then it 
■occurred to them that perhaps the odor of sanctity might be 
; greater if they moved to a more fashionable locality in the 
National Capital. Accordingly they did so, selling 'out their 
church to a negro congregation and building a new one. Just 
what modification of the efficacy of prayer from the two places 
will be is not announced. The doctrine that the Almighty is 
Influenced by the spot and the surroundings from which hom- 
-age is rendered Him is a new one. Are the negroes more ac- 
ceptable in the light of God, or the white people? Will a 
prayer from Massachusetts or Rhode Island avenue be more 
effective than one from "Swampdoodle" or "Hookers' Divi- 
sion?" — A. H. D. 



William Jennings Bryan complains that his goodly salary 

as Secretary of State does not make him a living, and he must 
therefore have recourse to the lecture platform to keep the 
wolf from the door. He needs something more than the thou- 
■ sands paid him annually by the common people, the taxpayers, 
to enable him to keep the table supplied with grape juice. It 
is too bad that the proprietor oi "The Commoner" should be 
so reduced. Yet. come tc think about it, when we consider the 
time he' devotes to his duties as member of the Cabinet, and 
the time he spends in bringing in extra dollars by his side lines, 
It is not altogether beyond the bounds of belief that he is fairly 
well paid for the former, even granting that his work as Sec- 
retary of State is of finest quality. — a. h. d. 



There is so much "clap-trap" advertising in these days 

that one feels inclined to refuse to notice the thousands of 
booklets which are scattered broadcast with a view to the 
separation of man and his money. But occasionally there is 
a really useful booklet given to the public which presents facts 
and leaves the rest to the reader's judgment. Such is the char- 
acter of a little book we are in receipt of which comes from 
176 Sutter street, the San Francisco home of Dr. Deimel Linen- 
Mesh Underwear. Here is a sample of the truths contained : 
"Health is easily preserved. Follow the instinct within you 
which will tell you to leave alone whatever is irritating, phy- 
sically or mentally." The statement is very, very simple, but 
it is a self-evident truth. And upon it is based the advice to 
people to wear linen-mesh underwear because it is what instinct 
must tell you is right both for your physical and mental com- 
fort and benefit. Sound argument like that carries weight. 
And it is the kind of advertising which inspires confidence. It 
is based on truth. 



A populai feature of Techau Tavern is the "hurried 

'luncheon," which appeals to business men and others whose 
time is limited. The menu, which is changed from day to day, 
is always generous in variety and a'ways appetizing. The sur- 
roundings are more quiet and agreeable than is the case in res- 
taurants devoted to quick lunches only, and the well-ventilated 
room is always comfortable. The cafe is also well filled every 
afternoon by ladies on shopping tour, who find here a most 
agreeable place for rest and refreshment. Dainty souvenirs are 
presented by the management, and are always selected with 
reference to the taste of discriminating people. 



THE $15 VICTROLA 
FITS IN A GRIP 

Take It To The Country 

The $ 1 5 model is a genuine Victrola, 
only smaller than the wonderful original. 
It will fit in a grip or suit-case — no cum- 
bersome horn to carry. 

Fine for dance music. 



Sherman.Hay&Co. 

Steinway and Other Pianos Victor Talking Machines 

Pianola Player Pianos 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay SU., Oakland 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 
RESTAURANT 



WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 




YOSEMITE VALLEY 

A VACATION GROUND 

v ns. ■ ii ii t • ■ uever loses Its charm through the changing seasons. Its 

fascinati fngera through the summer months. ris walls and 

domes are juel as Impres Ivi tts v, Hand and meadows, iis trails 

ind bs -pal hs are jusi is alluring. Us moun- 
tain an an<i quid shades are Just as restful 

YOSEMITE 13 YOSEMITE THE YEAR 
AROUND 

[| g >■ >'.vs re popula i each j < a r. Thou ■ 

sands visfl ii as a sights' eing i rip. Othei 
i lii usa nds k pend theii \ aca I ions then 

live Foi ■.'. '■< ks amid its ui andeui s. 

YOSEMITE IS THE PLACE FOR REST 
AND RECREATION 

i >■'. ii j .-Hi Ings t" points "i in ti r< si , J0II3 

- a round the evening 1 amp ftres. There 

a re hot< Is and b ding camps foi 1 hose n ho 

and prl at' camping toi I hose who 
prefer this way. Ask an y ri< k< 1 kgeni foi 
?< isi inii ting Colder, 

A BEAUTIFUL SOUVENIR BOOKLET 

Mailed on receipt 01 one dollar. A gem of 
Hi-- printing art; 3 ! pag s In full colors ' !on ■ 
I iins 10 rtdv it ! semen! s 




YOSEMITE V\LLEV 
RAILROAD COMPANY 

Merced, Cal. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




PL/E/ 




'We obey no wand h'it Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 



The Orpheum, 

The program this week does really assume big 
proportions; in fact, it is easily the best all-round 
bill which has been seen there for a long time. There 
is not even one number which does not in every re- 
spect measure up to the best Orpheum standard, and 
as the circus spieler would say: "It is a glittering 
galaxy of great acts." The Goyt Trio are scheduled 
to open the proceedings. The feature of their diver- 
sion is a dog who does some remarkable somersaults. 
The trio is undeniably clever, and serve to whet the 
appetite for the good things to come. An act of sur- 
passing merit is that of Theodore Bendix, the well- 
known composer, musician and conductor, who 
brings three other musicians with him, and they 
provide a twenty-minute chamber concert which is 
a veritable joy to listen to. Anybody who knows of 
Theodore Thomas and his great Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra will know Bendix, who for years was one 
of the moving spirits of the orchestra. The pro- 
gram they render this week, besides being artistic 
makes a public appeal, and the applause is as spon- 
taneous up in the gallery as it is in the down-stairs 
seats, evidence conclusive that good music well ren- 
dered is enjoyed by everybody. The short concert 
proved a real treat. Mclntyre and Harty, who are 
no strangers here, bring back the same act which has 
won success for them before. Locally, they have 
become great favorites, and their work merits this 
appreciation. One of Jesse Lasky's most ambitious 
efforts is a tabloid musical play entitled "The 
Trained Nurses," which he is showing us this week. 
It enlists the services of about twenty people, who 
have pretty costumes, and the one scene is very at- 
tractive. The musical numbers are much above the 
average, and the work of Miss Clark and Mr. Berg- 
man contribute signally to the success of the little 
musical play. Bergman is a fine dancer, about as 
nimble as any of them, and Miss Clark sings quite 
well and dances gracefully. It is on the whole one 
of the most satisfactory acts which Lasky has sent 
us, and we have seen a number of them the past 
few years. 

Willard Mack and Marjorie Rambeau present an 
effective act written by Mr. Mack, which he calls 
"Kick In." It is a story of the underworld, and has 
to do with crooks and their pals and grafting police. 
The story is intensely interesting and has a human 
note which Miss Rambeau sounds in a splendidly 
capable manner. Miss Rambeau is a San Francisco 
girl who received her first dramatic requirements at 
a local dramatic school. She has made great strides forward 
in her work, and is a capital foil for Mack, who shows himself 
to be an actor with quiet and natural methods which are always 
effective. Arthur Price as the grafting policeman is very good, 
though Lillian Rambeau as "Boston Bessie" makes her char- 
acter more or less of a caricature in both make-up and manner. 
The act is a fine one, and registered a big hit. Irene Franklin 
comes perilously near to carrying off the individual honors of 
the evening. She does character songs, and she is an Ameri- 
can, and best of all, she is fully as clever as Alice Lloyd or 
any of them from across the pond. Anybody doubting this 
statement is invited to the Orpheum this week, and I am posi- 
tive will coincide with me. Miss Franklin has every essential 
of cleverness necessary, and she has a pleasing personality and 
manner which grows on you, and which you cannot deny. 
Moran and Wiser are comedy hat-throwers, and the very best 
of the kind I have ever seer. They are experts in this par- 
ticular branch of amusement, and they furnish plenty of comedy 
besides. The audience likes them immense!;.-. The Le Grohs. 




Pat Rnoney and Marion Bent at the Orpheum Sunday. 



two men and a woman, are contortionists extraordinary. One 
of the men is truly great, his feats of contortion seeming al- 
most beyond belief. It is a great program which should not 
be missed. 



VISIT THE 



New China Cafe 



CHOP SUEY 



The Largest and most Exclusive Chinese Restaurant in Oakland. 
Oriental and American Dishes prepared under the supervision 
of exoert chefs. Merchants' Lunch daily ■ except Sunday > 

11 a. m. to 2 p. m., 25c and 35c. 

Special Music Quality and Service Unexcelled 

4sl Twelfth Street, brtween Washington and Broadway, Upstairs 

You will find this Cafe Sanitary, Homelike and Attractive 
The moving "Chop Su*t" *i«o will direct joq 

W. C. LEE. Manager 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



"Such a Little Queen" at the Alcazar. 

Bessie Barriscale is back again. She has had some real 
Eastern experience, having been featured in Tully's "Bird of 
Paradise," and in which she scored a signal success. Report 
has it that she is to do the play during her engagement at the 
Alcazar. We, that is, her friends, and there are many of them 
in this old town of ours, hope she will do the play and allow 
us the same opportunity she accorded her admirers in the East. 
This week she appears to advantage in Channing Pollock's 
fanciful comedy, in which I believe Elsie Ferguson was fea- 
tured. As the title would indicate, the plot deals with kings 
and queens, and in this instance the king and queen of two 
imaginary countries which adjoin each other are for some rea- 
son sent away in exile to America. Of course, they are in love 
with each other, and the play portrays a king and queen living 
in a small flat in New York, trying to cook their own meals and 
pawning the crown jewels in order to pay the landlord and the 
grocer. There is opportunity for some unusual situations and 
some hearty comedy, and the playwright has also brought out 
some very interesting and unusual situations which have the 
tinge of novelty. The play was a success in the East, and this 
is our first glimpse of it out here. 

Dainty Bessie Barriscale could not have chosen a better 
medium to bring her back than the role of the queen. Her 
scene where she cooks the dinner clad in her coronation robe, 
because she has only one street dress which she must save, is 
very humorous, and Miss Barriscale makes the most of it. 
There is no denying the fact that this little lady has broadened 
in her work. While the same sweet personality is there as 
before, she shows a firmer touch in her work, which a wider 
experience and more confidence has brought about, and the 
result is gratifying in the extreme. Her role this week runs 
the gamut from light comedy to mighty serious work, and she 
handles all her scenes equally well, and manages to work up to 
her dramatic climaxes with surprising power, which, of course, 
is a source of pleasure to her admirers, who have always pre- 
dicted a very bright future for her. The Alcazar company are 
loyal in supporting Miss Barriscale in a very efficient manner. 
Howard Hickman is here with his wife, and is assigned a kind 
of a juvenile hero role, a part in which we have not seen him 
before, and making love to his own wife on the stage is, I pre- 
sume, a new sensation with him. Hickman has proved his worth 
as a very capable actor during his years with the Alcazar 
Company, and we have come to expect nothing but good of 
him, and this week he does not disappoint us. Kernan Cripps 
as the king does the most satisfying work I have seen him do 
since his advent at this theatre. He plays with quiet reserve, 
which he has not displayed before. Bert Wesner as the prime 
minister is a splendid figure. It is a performance which stands 
out like a cameo. The innate dignity he gives the character 
and the Wesner method of naturalness all contribute to a per- 
formance which is notable. Roy Clements also comes to the 
front this week in a fine role which he plays with distinction 
and in a manner to please his many admirers. Lee Millar in a 
striking make-up is wonderfully effective -is General Myrza. 
It is fine work, for which much praise is due. Alice Patek 
again confirms the pleasing impression she created a few weeks 
ago when she made her local debut. 

» » * 

Pantages Theatre. 

The feature of an all-round good bill at Pantages this week is 
the headliner attraction, "A Night in Hawaii," in which there 
is some tropical dancing and singing, the latter being a fine 
sample of perfect harmony. The Hula-Hula girl dancer in this 
act is making a decided hit, and the closing scene which depicts 
the eruption of a volcano on the Island of Hawaii is vivid. The 
eccentric dancers, Coogan and Cox, are top notchers in their 
line, and their comedy is of the variety which brings forth 
laughs without effort. The drama, "The Police Inspector," is 
intense with human interest, and the portrayal of all the charac- 
ters is exceptionally good. This act has been looked forward 
to for some time, and is all that was expected. Tango dancing, 
real genuine tango, is furnished by Hathaway and Mack; anfl 
Belle Oliver, billed as the Tetrazzini of Ragtime, makes a hit in 
songs cleverly rendered. The Florenz trio present an acrobatic 
offering, and Zalfredo, a violinist, round out a bill of merit. 
The Pantages motto is known to be "Please the public," and it 
is well lived up to this week. Several big features are prom-. 



ised for the next month, and if the character of the fulfillment 
of promises as evidenced this week is a good one to go by, 

Pantages is sure to be filled to capacity every night. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Alcazar Theatre. — Forrest Stanley returns to the Alcazar 
Theatre next Monday evening to serve as Bessie Barriscale's 
co-star during the remainder of her season there. James 
Forbes' successful American comedy, "The Traveling Sales- 
man," which will be the medium of Mr. Stanley's reappearance 
in the O'Farrell street home of drama, was chosen because it 
enabled him to score an emphatic hit in the East, and affords 
Miss Barriscale almost equal opportunity to do effective work. 
He will be seen as Bob Blake, a typical commercial tourist, 
and she as Beth Elliott, the pretty ticket-seller at a village 
railroad station in the Middle West. Bob and Beth are intro- 
duced at the station. Their acquaintanceship rapidly ripens 
and he learns that she owns a section of apparently worthless 
land that is to be sold for unpaid taxes. Neither of them is 
aware that the railroad company has decided to use the prop- 
erty for a spur track. Then follows some interesting complica- 
tions in which Franklyn Royce, another admirer of Beth's, 
participates. Royce attempts to get the land away from Beth 
for his employer, a capitalist, when Bob intervenes, and after 
considerable difficulty saves the land for her. Thus he thwarts 

a plot and wins a wife. 

* • • 

"The Mikado" at the Tivoli. — Commencing Monday evening, 
July 21st, the Tivoli will put on an elaborate revival of Gilbert 
& Sullivan's tremendously popular comic opera, "The Mikado." 
This charming travesty of Japan, with the exception of "Pina- 
fore," has proved to be the most successful of all the Gilbert 
and Sullivan operas, and it has been translated and played in 
France, Germany and other countries. In the present revival, 
everything possible is being done to comply with the best tra- 
ditions of the earlier productions, and there is no doubt that this 
will eclipse all previous efforts of the Tivoli management. The 
cast will be a notable one, including Teddy Webb as "Koko," 
the Lord High Executioner; John R. Phillips as "Nanki Poo;" 
Robert Pitkin as the Mikado. The feminine roles will include 
"Yum Yum," Miss Rena Vivienne, and Sarah Edwards will 
have the exacting role of "Katisha." The story of "The 
Mikado" is so well known that it need not be repeated here. 
A strange thing in connection with the music of "The Mikado" 
is the fact that, with a single exception, a march chorus in the 
second act, there is no local color to it as might have been ex- 
pected in an opera entirely Japanese in its subject and dramatic 
treatment. Performances are given at the Tivoli every even- 
ing, with regular matinees on Saturdays and Sundays at popu- 
lar prices. 

* * * 

Columbia Theatre. — Remarkable features will be added to 
the program of the kinemacolor season at the Columbia Thea- 
tre for the third week, commencing this Sunday afternoon, 
when the main features of "The Making of the Panama Canal" 
and "Actual Scenes of the Balkan War" will be supplemented 
by the presentation of the story of the great American novel, 
"The Scarlet Letter," written by the famous novelist, Nathaniel 
Hawthorne. 

That the public is vitally interested in the Panama Canal and 
in the Balkan War scenes is shown by the crowded houses the 
Columbia Theatre is now enjoying. "The Scarlet Letter" 
ranks as the great classic of American libraries, and the pre- 
sentation in kinemacolor of this famous story thrills the spec- 
tator whether the book has been read or not. The perfect 
picturization of this romance of the Pilgrim Fathers and the 
Puritans, the plainly told plot and the realism of the actors 
who posed for the characters, has placed this kinemacolor pro- 
duction in the classic ranks, just as the novel itself is classed 
in libraries. Daily matinees at 2 :30 p. m., and regular evening 
presentations at 8 :30 p. m will be given during the balance of 
the kinemacolor season at the Columbia Theatre. 

» * * 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum announces for next week one of 
the best and most novel bills in its history. Six of the acts 
will be new, and the entire bill will be of extraordinary excel- 
lence. Miss Orford will introduce her marvelous elephants. 
To see the two immense, ungainly animals, each weighing about 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



three and a half tons, and the baby elephant, going through a 
variety of wonderful feats is a sight worth beholding. They 
are also par.tomimists, and enact a little play of domestic life — 
the family supper, baby's bedtime, concluding with the rescue 
of Miss Orford from the upper window of a burning house. 

Pat Rooney and Marion Bent will present a bit called "At 
the News-Stand," which bristles with wit and humor. Rooney 
is one of the best dancers before the public, and also a capital 
comedian. His partner is a lively and engaging actress, who 
also excels in song and dance. 

Lamberti, the master musician, who plays upon the violin, 
'cello and piano, has evolved a distinct and unique method of 
displaying his genius. In different make-ups, he portrays 
various composers playing their respective compositions, and 
accurately depicting their mannerisms and peculiarities. 

Hal Davis, Inez Macaulay and their company will present 
an up-to-the-minute comedy by Archie Colby, called "The Girl 
from Childs," which is remarkable for its originality and genu- 
ine humor. 

A sketch by Miss Elsie Janis, the distinguished star and au- 
thoress, entitled "Three in One," will be an amusing feature, 
and will serve to introduce Val Harris, Reta Boland and Lou 
Holtz, who are three personally developed proteges of Miss 
Janis. 

Ida O'Day will introduce her original Songologue. When last 
seen hcr^; Miss O'Day was the successful star of a pretty play, 
"A Bit of Old Chelsea." 



Pantages Theatre. — The program for the coming week at the 
Pantages, opening on Sunday, bristles with names prominent 
in fistdom circles. Arthur Pelkey, the recently acknowledged 
champion heavyweight of the world, who by his victory over 
the "cowboy" pugilist, Luther McCarthy, leaped to the front 
overnight, will head the bill with Tommy Burns. This is 
Pelkey's first appearance in this city, and interest is keen as 
to the real value of the new-comer as a genuine claimant for 
the crown of the pugilistic arena. Burns, who is acting as the 
big fellow's manager, will be seen in a sharp little set-to of 
three rounds, preceded by some clever rope skipping, bag 
punching and shadow boxing by the champion. On the same 
bill, by a curious coincidence, is Mrs. Bob Fitzsimmons, who 
will be seen in a brilliant musical extravaganza, entitled "A 
Bulgarian Romance." Mrs. Fitzsimmons' principal support is 
Charles Dano, the well known operatic tenor, who was last 
seen here on the first visit of the "Chocolate Soldier." The 
entire cast carries fourteen people in all, and is an elaborate 
affair, well staged and sparkling with jingling tunes. As Julia 
Gifford, Mrs. Fitzsimmons won a name for herself in musical 
comedy, and still retains her brilliant lyric soprano voice. "The 
Newly Married Man," a real live wire comedy playlet, will be 
presented by Bernard and Harrington. A blonde hair is the 
cause of a series of bickerings intermingled with laughable 
comedy. The sketch has scored one of the biggest laughing 
hits ever on the Pantages Circuit. Sylvester and Vance, a duo 
of singers and dancers, have a delightful little offering which 
affords Vance a splendid opportunity of rendering his famous 
yodeling selections. A trio well versed in ncrobatic and gym- 
nastic versatility is the Mars Duo, who introduce art bits of 
wire walking, juggling and sensational trapeze performance. 
Billy Dodge, a well known local entertainer, will give his in- 
imitable imitations of famous singers and character actors. 



Orchestra.— A series of musical attractions 
of more than usual interest is announced for the coming season 
by Frank W. Healy. Geraldine Farrar, the beautiful and ac- 
complished soprano of the Metropolitan Opera House. New 
York City, under management of Charles A. Ellis. Boston, will 
open the San Francisco concert season Sunday afternoon. Oc- 
tober 5th. Mr. Ellis, who is also directing the tour of Fritz 
Kreisler, has entrusted the local management of his artists to 
Frank W. Healy. manager San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra. Fritz Kreisler 's first San Francisco appearance will be as 
soloist with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Friday 
afternoon, February 20th. Clarence Whitehill, the great bari- 
tone, will also be presented by Mr. Healy in recital at Scottish 
Rite Hall. December 9th. Mr. Whitehill is magnificent! 
matic and superb vocally. 



EXCURSION TO SANTA CRUZ, JULY 20th. 
$2.00 round trip via Southern Pacific from San Francisco, 
Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda, Mountain View, Niles, Newark, 
and points between. Casino, surf bathing, fishing, boating, 
yachting, golfing. 



Tivoli Opera-House 



Phone Sutter 4200 



Commencing Monday July -1st. Another Revival Gilbert and Sullivan's 
Glorious Opera 

"THE MIKADO" 

With its (in.- old souks and bright witty comedy. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

POPULAR PRICES— 2Sc. 50c, and 75c, Box Seats $1.00 



Alcazar Theatre 



O'Farrell Street near Powell 
Phone: Kearny 2; 



Monday Evening, July 21, and Throughout the "Week, 
BESSIE BARRISCALE 
FORREST STANLEY 

Howard Hickman and the Aldazar Company in the Successful American 
Play, 

"THE TRAVELING SALESMAN" 
By James Forbes, Author of "The Chorus Lady," Etc. 

Prices — Nights, 25c. to $1; matinees, 25c. to 50c. Matinee Thurs- 
day. Saturday, Sunday. 

Columbi a Theatre ses ssas 8 S- 8treet8 

\JKJVIAjIIOUV\A/ J. IVKJKAjVl C- The Leading Playhouse 

Gottlob, Marx A Co.. Managers 

KINEMACOLOR PICTURES 
Beginning with SUNDAY MATINEE JULY 20 THIRD WEEK. Matinees 
Every Day at 2;30— Evenings at 8:30. 

NEW SPECIAL FEATURES 
The Sensatiunal "SCARLET LETTER," Beautiful ScenicTriumph "NIAGARA 
FALLS" in addition to "THE MAKING OF THE PANAMA CANAL" and 
"ACTUAL SCENES OF THE BALKAN WAR" Animated Photography in 
Natural Colors. 
Prices, Matinees any seat 25c. Evening. Reserved J."e.. 36c. and 50c. 

O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 7n 

Safest ami Most Magnificent Theater in America 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 
PEERLESS VAUDEVILLE 

MISSORFOR t WONDERFUL ELEPHANTS; PAT ROONEY AND 

MARION BENT, "At The News Stand:" LAMBERTI, "The Master Musician; 
UAL DAVIS, INEZ mai'.m LEV & CO., In the np-to-the-mlnute Comedy "The 
Girl From Childs;- HARRIS, BOLAND & HOLT/, presenting "Three In One" 
written and produced !»y Elsie lanis; II'A O'DAY in Her original Songologue; 

i in ;l- BENDIX and HIS SYMPHONY PLAYERS; ORPHEI'M MOTION 

PICTURES Showing Current Events. Set 1 Week— The Theatrical Sensation 

,,i the City The American Comedienne Miss [RENE franklin with 
\ir- Burt Green al the Piano. 

Evening prices — 10c. 26c, 60c, 76c. Box seats, $1. Matinee 
prices (except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c. 50c 



Orpheum 



Pantages' Theatre 



Market Street opposite Mason 



Week starting Bundaj Matinee, July 20tii 

A #-j.ni«i Attraction ARTIU'R I'EI.KEY Champion Heavy Weight of 



the 



World with Tommy Bums, Ex-Champion: Ufa. Boh Fltaimmone Assisted 
Cast of M. "A Bl [J U;[ \N BOW it I I BERNARD 
,i„l HARRINGTON "The NewlJ Married Man;' SYLVESTER and VANCE 
Flit. Entertainers: MARS DUO, Oddities in Acrobatics; BILLY DODGE. 
Beau Brummel Songster: ILSACE and LORRAINE, Musical Monarchs, 
Matinee Daily at 2:30: Niwhts at 7:16 and 9:16. Sundays and Holidays 
Ightl Continuous From 0:80. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 




Oriental Tavern 

105 Powell -108 Ellis Streets 

Most Unique Tavern in 
San Francisco 

Soft Chinese Music 

First Class American 
Dishes and Chop Suey. 

Mercantile Lunch for 
Shoppers. 

Chinese maids in attendance 

Every Friday afternoon a beau- 
tiful present will be given the 
lady holding the lucky number 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 




0CffiTX 



^ 




They say Felton Elkins is in love — wildly, madly in love, 
with a certain popular and delightful San Francisco woman, 
who has spent much of her time abroad, but who is now occupy- 
ing a house in San Mateo. The lady is not free to marry — ac- 
cording to law. But she has been separated from her husband 
for several years, and under the conditions, the law in this 
State would grant her a divorce. But whethei the lady herself 
wishes a divorce or not is the problem. She is more than com- 
fortably well off. She is young ; she is attractive ; she is free 
to go about as she likes, without the danger of incurring gossip. 
She has unquestioned social position. There is really no reason 
why she should wish to marry again, unless the wiles of Eros 
are cunning enough to entangie her in a web of romance which 
is certainly lacking in her present marriage, as the lady's hus- 
band lost his mental balance long ago, and has been in a sana- 
torium somewhere in Europe. 

In fact, they have lived apart for years, so she is morally, 
if not legally, free to accept the attentions of any young gallant 
who is attracted by her charms. And there have been many, 
although she has looked with favor on none but her present 
swain. 

It is said that his mother favors the match — in fact, is very 
anxious for it. There is not such a difference of years between 
the two that would cause inharmony in later years, and Mrs. 
Elkins, it is said, believes that a woman a few years her son's 
senior will give him just the balance his liberal nature needs. 
Felton has wads of money. He's about the richest of the young 
swains down peninsula way. He buys a new motor car about 
as easily as another man would buy a new hat, and with less 
strain on his pocketbook. 

He is quite a clever chap, too. He has an exceedingly well 
developed literary bent, and besides being a champion at polo 
and golf, writes very good plays and one-act sketches, and is 
not at all bad as an amateur actor. 

This, of course, is to say nothing of his reputation as a gay 
cavalier. Felton has been in love many times. He was steeped 
in adoration for Enid Gregg, and then for Merritte Reid, and 
again for Gale Anderton. But the affection has never taken 
such a serious turn as it has now. They say this is the one real 
iove affair of the lad's life. Of the lady, all society does is to 
speculate, although she seems immensely entertained when 
sipping tea with him at the Burlingame Club, or thereabouts. 
9 9 9 

There is not a doubt but that the Calico Ball which Evelyn 
and Genevieve Cunningham are going to give this Saturday 
night at "Hazelwood," their mother, Mrs. James Athearn Fol- 
ger's, home in Woodside, will be the jolliest affair of the sea- 
son. In the first place, Evelyn and Genevieve have a knack of 
making every one feel at home, ?.nd their cousin, Lois Cunning- 
ham, for whom they are entertaining, is as full of fun as they 
are. Then, their guests have been selected from among the set 
that is familiar with each other's personal foibles, and they 
will have great fun finding out who's who underneath the calico 
disguises. 

Every one is obliged to wear calico, whether he is imperson- 
ating a Romeo or a milkmaid. But no restriction is put upon 
the design, the period or the character impersonation. The 
calico idea is an extremely clever one. It is not only in keep- 
ing with the simplicity which is such good form in the summer 
months — and just now the fashionable pose — but it is the 
chance of a lifetime for ingenious girl or swain to display artis- 
tic sense and show what can be done with a piece of plain 
gingham. Several girls, in tact, have expressed their inten- 
tion of making frock? as fetching as possible, just to show the 
bachelors that a girl can dress on nothing a year, and look as 
pretty as if she wore Parisian embroidery and chiffons. 

Informality is the keynote of these barn dance affairs. Mrs. 
Henry T. Scott gave one at the Burlingame Club a few months 



ago, and it was enjoyed by every one fortunate enough to get 
an invitation. It must not be forgotten, however, that Mrs. 
Francis Carolan was the first to give a calico ball in Burlin- 
game. She opened the barn at "The Crossways" with one, 
twelve or fifteen years ago, and it was such a success that it is 
talked of to-day. No doubt it was a little gayer than the one 
at the Cunninghams will be, for those who attended the Caro- 
lan affair were more than one year past the debutante period, 
and the Cunningham girls, while jolly, are still apt to cling 
to the conservative type of entertainment. Lois Cunningham 
came to California with Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, and remained to 
spend the summer here. She is a connection of the wife of 
the late ambassador to England. 

© © © 

Another affair down Woodside way on the same night will 
be the dinner dance to be given at the Menlo Park Country 
Club. The club and the members, all who are not at the Cun- 
ningham affair, will be in festive attire for the entertainment 
of visiting golfers from the Burlingame Club. A tournament 
is being played in the afternoon at the new Redwood links, 
when Blingum will try Menlo out, and the Menloites will try 
to hold their own against the onslaught of their visitors. Alto- 
gether, the lower part of the peninsula will take on a festive 
aspect, and scarcely a member of the "holy" circle will be left 
up Hillsborough way or in the city. 
© © © 

Surprise engagements seem to be in vogue in the illustrious 
Grant family. Less than two months ago, Nell Grant startled 
her friends by announcing her engagement to Lieutenant-Com- 
mander William Piggott Cronan, and their marriage by Judge 
Barnett was no less of a facer. Now comes the news that 
Nell's uncle, Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., has become betrothed to a 
dashing widow exactly half his age. Love, like measles, seems 
to be an epidemic. Grant and his future bride fell in love on 
the train while traveling West, he to his home in San Diego and 
she to her mother in Los Angeles. The bride-to-be, by the way, 
is Mrs. America W. Will. She is one of the prominent women 
in Los Angeles. Her mother was a Miss Chaffee, sister of 
United States Senator Chaffee of Colorado. Every one is 
wondering whether the marriage of Mr. Grant and the pretty 
widow will be accomplished with as much despatch as that of 
his niece. 

© © © 

Chancellor David Starr Jordan is enjoying the distinction of 
being entertained by the Duchess of Marlborough. She gave 
a large reception in his honor, to which the royalty and nobility 
of England were invited. The Duchess is charmingly demo- 
cratic, and puts intellect and character before blood or money 
in her choice of associates. Her marked appreciation of Doctor 
Jordan really places him among the intellectual elect. He has 
been exploiting his pet hobbies in her drawing-room with as 
much ease as he discourses with the faculty at Stanford, and 
has made himself a favorite abroad. No doubt when Doctor 




July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Jordan returns he will be lionized and feted like a debutante, 
if he is not too modest and retiring. Every one in San Fran- 
cisco will be hanging on his words, made far more precious 
since Consuelo found them worth listening to. Perhaps he will 
give some impetus to the idle set by telling them about the 
enterprising little American duchess and all she is doing in the 
way of settlement work. But no dcubt there will be far more 
intimate and interesting gossip that the Doctor will bring with 
him from Merrie England, for he has had the unusual oppor- 
tunity of seeing nobility at close r ange and noting that they 
are human, like the rest of us. 

They are really more human, in fact, because they are free 
enough from self-consciousness to express their real natures. 
What is more delightfully frank than a Britisher. Provincial 
Americans think them impertinent, but in the Burlingame set, 
and among the people who have traveled, one hears that there 
is nothing more refreshing than British frankness. Their can- 
dor is like that of a child. One takes the little shock of un- 
pleasantness with a smile, because one knows that, when a 
compliment comes, it has the merit of truth. 
© © © 

Matinee dances have caught on in Burlingame. They have a 
youthful flavor to them, and remind the matrons of the time 
when they went to Saturday afternoon dances at the different 
prep, schools. They have the spice of novelty to them, too, 
and remind one of those charmingly informal daytime hops 
the naval officers give so frequently aboard ship. 

The dances were sure to be popular with the girls, but they 
took with the men and the older set as well. They have been 
au fait for the past year in the East, but it took us four whole 
seasons to catch up to Newport. But it promises to be the most 
absorbing of society's pastimes. The day dance has not trav- 
eled down to Menlo yet, or over to Claremont or Ross, but it 
will not be long before all the bay elite is tripping the light 
fantastic. Ethel Crocker and Sophie Beylard are two of the 
daintiest dancers in the smart set. They were among the 
dancers Saturday. 

© © © 

There was a young lady from Ghent, 
For sprinting she had a strong bent, 

She practiced all day, 

And those who know say 
That when she was going she went. (Some.) 

Residents of Pacific Heights would be shattered and 
shocked to know that in their very midst — not more than a 
thousand miles from the Panama-Pacific Exposition Site — 
there is a fairy speedway, where in the bewitching hours of 
twilight a dainty Miss Mercury is wont to follow the pastime 
(oh, to be sure, for practice only, or mayhap to flaunt the 
taunt of some challenging Bob or Harry or Joe) of her godly 
forbear of Grecian flights. 

And so this pretty maid of California soil, a dainty product, 
doth keep in trim, and with raven locks reclining gracefully on 
the fleeting breeze, she passeth — veritably flies from street to 
street with more than Mercurial speed. 

And this, Mrs. Grundy, for your delectation : That practice, 
that strong, sinewy limb, so finely trained in those roguish twi- 
light flights, made it possible, only this week, for this our 



comely maiden to save the lives of many ot her nearest and 
dearest relatives who live in the fire stricken district of Marin 
County. 

And thus it happened: In the evening, when the first actual 
thrilling news of danger threatening one of those pretty resi- 
dence towns in Marin, our heroine, with thought first for those 
she loved, rushed to the ferry, and by boat and train to one of 
the minor stations on the road to Mill Valley, thence to cross- 
country by foot to the residence of her family. 

Under such stress, how slow and creepy a thing is an ordi- 
nary railroad train, but with lives at stake, how terrible a dis- 
aster to find on arrival that all communication was cut off, mak- 
ing it imperative to travel all the way back to Sausalito and 
thence by another road to those in peril. Every minute counted, 
not one second was to be lost, and in this dilemma, nearly a 
mile from the railroad station, with the train steaming down 
the track, bringing with it the last chance of her reaching her 
marooned friends in time to be of aid, this well trained, noble 
minion of California's Four Hundred stopped not to think a sec- 
ond, but dashed on, with all her training and muscle racing to 
her aid, and with the train gaining visbly with every second, 
made one heroic effort to reach the station in time. And none 
too soon, for just as the last car left the limits of the platform, 
this brave young woman leaped or. board and was carried in 
safety to Sausalito. 

How timely was her act is shown by the expedition with 
which she reached her family in time to convey an invalid aunt 
to a place of safety. Thus did bravery find its own reward, 
and thus, Dear Mrs. Grundy, you must find excuse for the 
flights of fancy of our vivacious young society maids who are 
wont to stretch their enthusiasm, etc., on the secluded speed- 
ways of Pacific Heights. 

© © S.- 
George Carr, who was married Tuesday night to Miss Kath- 
erine Mortenson, is from Chicago, but came originally from 
St. Louis. The Carr family is about the mosi prominent there, 
and his connections in Chicago are equally favored. Miss Mor- 
tenson is from Chicago. Her father is a large lumber operator. 
Both families were spending the summer in Pasadena, and the 
affection which took root in Chicago blossomed and flourished 
in the balmy climate of Southern California. It was rather 
an odd thing for the entire clan to migrate to San Francisco 
and celebrate the marriage here, but quite in keeping with 
their inconspicuous way of doing things. Here they thought 
their wedding would pass unnoticed, and they would get by 
without the usual accompaniment of camera men who follow 
the very rich. The wedding was attended only by relatives. 
The couple left Wednesday for a trip to the Orient. They 
will doubtless stop in San Francisco on their return. They 
have many acquaintances here who are anxiously waiting the 
opportunity to entertain them. 




Scientific Treatment 
SCALP 

FACIAL 

MANICURING 

166 GEARY ST. 
Phone Douglas 977 SAN FRANCISCO 



CASTLE CRAGS 



Under same management as Hotel Del Monte. 

On main Oregon automobile highway and S. P. R. R. 

In the yellow pine forests of the Upper Sacramento River. 

Wonderful summer climate; bright warm days and coolnights. 

Beautiful trails through the shady forests for pedestrians or 
riding parties. 

Plenty of gentle horses and good guides. 

Automobiles for hire. 



The motor ride through 20,000 acres of virgin yellow pine 
forests is unequaled in California. 

Arrange your motor trips so as to stop over at CASTLE 
CRAGS for a day or two. Garage for automobiles; 
gasoline and oils. 

Rates: $18 to $24 per week. 

For be it tally illustrated folder and reservations, address, 
MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS, CALIFORNIA. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 




SOafflrPERSONBt'ITHB 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 
AITKEN-S1MPSOX. — Judge and Mrs. John It. Aitken announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter. Miss Florence Aitken, to Lieutenant Wm. 
Fitzhugh Lee Simpson of the Sixth Infantry stationed at the Presidio. 
COOMBS-GYLE. — An engagement of much interest which was made 
known this week was that of Miss Muriel Coombs, daughter of Mrs. 
{Catherine Coombs and the late Henry William Coombs of Napa, and 
Joseph C. Gyle of Corning. 
FLOWER-RTNZIE.— The engagement of Miss Marguerite Flower and Mr. 
Julian Kinzi'- came simultaneously with news that the wedding is to 
take place on a day in August to be decided latei on. 
FREESE sl'LKi IWSKI. — From Los Angeles ts news of the engage- 
ment Of MiSS Marie L<OUlse Freese and Prince August Stanislaus Sul- 
kowski, and the announcement that the n arrlage will take place nexl 
month. 

LEWENTHAL-JACOBS.— Mi. and Mrs. L. Lewenthal announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter. Miss Amy Lewenthal, to Samuel S. 
Jacobs. 

SlMPSuX-IUCKEY.— The engagement of Miss Mary Grace Simpson and 
Athol Bertram Rickey was announced al Q luncheon given by Miss 
Simpson at the Bellevue Hotel recently. 

WOODMAN-BAXTER-GOULD.— Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Woodman announep 
the engagement of their daughter. Kathryn Francis, to Mr. Wm. 
A. Baxter-Gould. The wedding will lake place in October. 
WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

( : A 1, LOIS- HILL.— Mrs. Eugene Gallois issued invitations last week 
the wedding of her daughter. Miss Jeanne Marie Gallois. and Hon 
Lewis Hill, Jr.. Which will take place on the afternoon of Thursday. 
July 24th, at the Fairmont Hotel. 

WEDDINGS. 

BRo"\YX-STE\YART. — The wedding of Miss I lei i rude Lewys Brown, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Brown, and J. Everett Stewart, 
took place recently at the residence of the bride's parents, 919 Guer- 
rero street, Rev. J. Harvuv l Idnsi in officiating. 

l>AYID-COHN. — The wedding of Samuel Conn and Miss Doretta David 
took place at the Sequoia Club on Wednesday evening. July loth. 

UE BOSF-X1-TWKLL. — Mrs. Mary Polk de Bose announces the marriage 
Of her daughter. Miss Jessie Melvor du Bose. td Daniel E. Newell, Jr.. 
on Tuesday afternoon, July loth. 

DEPENDENER-BAEMR.-On June 23d, at the Methodist parsonage at 
San Rafael. Miss Lulu E. Dependener became the wife of Walter 11. 
Baehr of San Francisco. 

FRISHMAN-IS.U'KSEX.— A quiet wedding took place at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Frishman at 1336 East Twenty-sixth strei 
Oakland, Monday evening, June 30lh. when their younger daughn-r. 
Anne Furner, became the bride of Albert Severn feacksen of Oakland. 

GREER-THIEL.— Miss Yvonne Greer and Mr. A. Adrian Thiel were mar- 
rled recently at the home of the bride's parents in Alpine Terrace. 

GIBSON-DUNCAN.— The marriage of Miss Bessie Gibson and Howard L. 
Duncan took place Sunday, July 6th. at the borne of the bride in 
Hyde street, which was elaborately decorated for the occasion. 

HARRIS-FREYERMi'TH— The marriage "1 Miss Minnie Maud Harris, 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Harris, and I »r. GttO G. 
Freyermuth. was celebrated in Rutherford, Napa County, June 5th. 

LEIGH-DAVIDSON.— Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Alexander Leigh, of San Jose, 
announce the marriage of their daughter, Alice Delicia, to Mr. James 
H. Davidson, son of Mrs. Charles Frank Putter, of Los Angeles. The 
marriage took place recently at Ail saints' Church, Riverside. 

PATTERSON-PRESTON.. — Captain and Mrs. Robert Julius Lawson have 
issued cards announcing the marriage of their daughter, Miss Merle 
Lawson-Pattcrson, to Jos. Warren Preston, h.. which was celebl il 
Saturday. May 17th. in Napa. 

PENCE-rXI-EUIIlLL.— The marriage of Miss Mary Ada Pence and Lieu- 
tenant Lewis K. Underbill took place Thursday evening, July 10th. at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Pence, In 
Berkrl* y. 

IIOSENBERG-EDWARDS.— The marriage is announced of Miss Eva 
RosenhiiL: i" Meyer A. Edwards, on July 7th. 

SELBY-HAYDEN. — The marriage of Miss Mars s«.-lbv and Curtiss Crane 
Hayden took place quietly Sunday, July 18th, at Grace Pro-Cathedral. 
The re'atives of the young couple and a few intimate friends were 
the only ones present. 

WALSH- LYNCH. — Miss Marian Elizabeth Walsh became the wife of 
James Terrence Lynch last Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at Star of 
the Sea Church, Father Philip O'Ryan officiate 
LUNCHEONS. 

ASHE.— Mrs. Mllo Ashe was hostess at a luncheon at the Palace on 
Tuesday, July Sth, entertaining a number of the friends of Anita Fia- 
havan, who is leaving shortly for Paris to continue her education. 

BROWN.— Mrs. Henry Ward Brown was a Luncheon hostess In her San 
Mateo home Wednesday afternoon, and entertained a dozen guests. 

FAYMOXYILLE. — Bernard Faymonville was host at an elaborate Luncheon 
at the Bohemian Club, entertaining in honor of his son. Lieutenant 
Philip Faymonville. who was recently elected to membership in his 
father's favorite club. 



MORRILL. — Mrs. Harry Clinton Morrill was hostess"~m i number of her 
friends from town recently, entertaining them at her bungalow at 
Camp Meeker. 

McKENZIE.— Mrs. James Allen McKenzie was hostess at a luncl n 

honor of the Women's Texas Society this week. 

OXNARD. — Mrs. Robert Oxnard was hostess on Thursday, July 10th, ;<t 
an elaborate luncheon at her home near Redw ! City, 

i 'OTTER. — In honor id* Mrs. m. .1. Connell ol i .i >s Angeles and Miss Marion 
Hall Smith of Boston, Mr. and Mrs. Mllo M. Potter gave a large re- 
ception and garden party at tin- Hotel Potter. 

TOPERT. — Mrs. William Toperl gave a luncheon at her home in Berkeley 

on Wednesday, July 9th, t" announce ti ngagement "i" Miss Hazel 

Lyons of San Francisco and Ralph F, McMurry ol Redding. 

VAN VOR3T:— Mrs. C. l;. Vajl \ >rs( entertained al a luncheon at her 
home <>ii Vallejo street recently. 

WODEH< i SE. Lord Wodehouse, who arrived from the East Tuesday, 

w-as the guest of bo ■ .ii an Informal luncheon mm tria't day. ^iven 

by Judge Frederick Hbnshan al th< Bohemian club. 

SfGTJNG. — Miss Agnes and Miss Lu :y Young were hostesses on Wednesday 
last In their summer home in Mill Valley !n bjnor of Mis. Putnam 
Young "i" New York, who Is enjoying i ■ irr in California, 

DINNERS. 

POLGER. — Mr. and Mis James A am Folger were .due.-.,' hosts In theli 

home in Woodslde on Tl sdaj evening, Jula 10th Twelve guests 

enjoyed their hospitality. 

SCOTT.— Mrs. C. o. Scott entertained last Saturda evening at an in- 
formal dinner in her home in Greenwich terra 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
BRYANT.— Dr. and Mis. Edgai i: i . Si ti I were host and hostess at a 
house party last week-end at their home. Cherry Kay Kabblnge, in 
the Santa Cruz Mountains, in u Los GatOS. 

TEAS. 

COSGRAVK.— Dr. Mllllcent Cosg i ;- : ■ entertained aboul I E her friends 

at a tea on Saturday afternoon at her home to meet Mile. Yvonne de 

TrevlUe, and her mother, Mum. Trevllle, who have I a guests at the 

St Francis for a fortnight. 

heberhart. — The lirst tea danci if thi season was given on Tuesday, 
July Bth, by Mr. William Ramsey Heberharl hosl ol Hotel del Coro- 
nado. About sixt g ere in attendance. 

REYNOLDS. — Mrs. A. L. Reynolds o( Berkeley was hostess to a bevy 
of her young friends at a mal tly, with tea afterwards at tin- 

Palace. Her hospitality was in compliment t" .Miss Margaret Pitts 
and her guest. Miss Kathryn Ryan of Los Angeles, both li tvlng on 
Tuesday for Colorado Springs. 

DANCES. 

potter, -Mr. and Mis. Milo Potter entertained at ■■ large dance in the 
Hotel r<n.t"j in s.int.i Barbarn on Tuesday nighl In compltm 
Mr. and Mrs. Marry Chick&rlng - I tfi and -Mis Walter Filer of 
New York. 

SOUTHERN CLUB.— The Southern Club was host at :■ dance, with a 
number of small. Inforn parties prec< 

MOTORING. 
WALLER, -Mr and Mis C, W Wallei and Miss Evelyn Waller 

cently foi a moiiw trip t<> Lake County. 
WESTCOTT. — Leo Westcotl left a t* ■,, f or Tahoe on a motor 

trip through Lake County. He will be away one month. 
YERRINGTON. — Dr. ami Mrs. M-rh.-rt Sherrington i'H by n r T 

aftern< foi e «sll t" Nevada, where they will be lolned by Mrs. 

Serrlngton's little daughter, Miss Hoi lis Hamilton. 

RECEPTIONS. 

GOLDSTBUS i i reception of Miss Maybelle Goldstein and Mr. Philip 
Kaufmann was held at the home o£ Mies Goldstein's sister, Mrs. K. 
Kaan, in San Jose avenue, Alameda. Sunda; i 

PARTIES. 

McKITTRJCK. — A surprise party was tendered to Miss Margaret McKlt- 
trlck "a in I'. evening. June 17th, in honor ot hei seventeenth 
birthday, at her residence in Alvarado street. 

OPHITE CLUB- Members ol thi Ophite Club entertained at a box party 
at the Orpheum ending in a banquet complimentary to Ensign Ham- 
ilton v'ose i ; > j an .i till 3 g i adua t< ol \ n napolls. 

TTBBITTS.— Mr. ami Mrs. Robert Tlbbitts entertained guests ri hen 

and Berkeley for several days, having a larg< irty at their 

country place near Los < iatos. 



TO YOSEMITE IN A NIGHT. 
Dont Miss It. 
Pullman sleeping c?.r via Southern Pacific. Leave ferry sta- 
tion 9:40 p. m. ; Oakland, Sixteenth street station, 10:17 p. m., 
arriving El Portal 7 a. m. Round irip from San Francisco, in- 
cluding stage between Hotel Del Portal and Sentinel Hotel, in 
center of the park, 14 miles, $22.35. Stage thence to Wawona 
{Mariposa Big Trees), 25 miles, and return, $15, Comfortable 
camps in addition to first-class hotels. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



[7 



ARRIVALS. 

avknam. — ■ M r, 5JJ3 SiJrs, Lorenzo Vvenall returned Wondaj to their 
home In IfeJtvenworflT ltre< 

lUKHiiN'.- Mra. Edward Barron and the -Misses Margaret and Evelyn 

Barron, who have been tn Europe, have returned! to their home In 

Mayfield for the summer. 
BL.1SS. — Mr. and Mrs, Walter Bliss have returned from Lake Talioe. 
BROMFIBLD.— Mr. and Mrs. l\ Gordon Bromfleld and little son, Innis, 

have returned from a five weeks' trip to New York and South Bend, 

Indiana, where they visited Mis. Bromfleld's relatives. 
BRYANT. — Mi's. A. N. Bryant and Miss Marie Louise Bryant, who have 

been visiting in Berkeley for the last few days, returned recently 

to their home in Broderick street. 
BULL, — Mrs. Alpheus Bull and her sister. Mrs. Robinson, accompanied 

by the latter's children, have returned to the Bull residence in Pacific 

avenue after a visit of several weeks in Bolinas. 
BULL. — Miss Elizabeth Bull and Miss Margaret Carrigan have returned 

from Carmel. 
COOL. — Dr. Lu Ella Cool and Mrs. C C. Freeman, who have been spend- 
ing a few days at Los Angeles and Sierra Madre, have returned to 

the Cadillac Hotel. 
COOK. — Judge and Mrs. Carroll Cook have returned to their home in 

Broadway, after a lengthy visit at their country home, El Nido, in 

Glen Ellen. 
UILLMAN, — Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Dillman have come from their home in 

Sacramento, and are spending several days at the Hotel Bellevue. 
DRAPER. — Mrs. Louise Kelsey Draper has returned to her home in 

Coronado after a brief visit with friends in this city. 
DUFFICY. — Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Dufficy and Mr. and Mrs. Alden Anderson 

and Miss Margaret Anderson, are home from a delightful outing of 

several weeks in Alaska. 
GASSNER. — Louis Gassner has returned to his home in this city after a 

trip to Europe. 
GRANT. — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant and their daughters, Miss Edith 

and Miss Josephine Grant, have returned from Webber Lake, and are 

at their home in San Jose. 
HEGER, — Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Heger, Miss Mary Dowling and Miss Agnes 

Dowling have just returned from a motoring trip to Coronado. 
HILL. — Mrs. Horace Hill, Miss Eugene Gallois, Miss Jeanne Gallols and 

Horace Hill, Jr., have returned from a motor trip through Lake 

County. s 
HOBART. — Mrs. H, Neil Hobart and Miss Mary Eyre returned to San 

Francisco on the Mongolia Wednesday, July Pth. 
INNES. — Mrs. George Innes, who has been spending several weeks at 

Castle Crags, returned to San Francisco last week. 
McNEAR. — Mr. and Mrs. George McNear and Miss Ernestin McNear, who 

have been abroad for a year, have arrived in New York en route to 

San Francisco. 
METCALF. — Mrs. Victor Metcalf, Jr.. returned from Lake Tahoe, re- 
cently, wher-; she has been for the past week. 
PAYOT. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Payot returned to their home in this city 

recently, from Lake Tallac. 
SPRAGUE. — Mr. and Mr?. Richard Sprague and their sons have returned 

from Del Monte. 
SUTRO. — Mr. and Mrs. Osrar Sutro have returned to their home in 

Piedmont, after having enjoyed an extended visit at Lake TahO< 
TRASK. — Mrs. J. E. D, Trask has come out from her home in th 

and with Mr. Trask, who la Chief of the Department of Fine Arts of 

the Panama-Pacific Exposition, is located In Berkeley at The I 

Apartments. Later they eontemplate a trip to Europe in conni 

with the Exposition. 

DEPARTURES. 

AMES.— Mr. and Mrs. Fisher Ames have left San Francisco to pass the 

entire summer at Marionwood, Los Gatos. 
BARRON. — Mr. and Mrs. Kdward F. Barron left fot New York recently, 

en route for Europe. 
BRESSE, — Mrs. Eugene B BreMe, Miss Hetha MeMahan and 

Miss Grace Gibson h iv« gone to Paflo Roblea for a fortnight's B< 
CHASE.— The Horace Blanchard Chase family has gone to Castle Crags 

for the summer, 

1 H ■:. W Mrs. Alexandra de Clati rrwnt Maekay I. -ft for Lm Angeles re- 
cently, where she is being entertained extensively, 

MURPHY, Frederick L. Murphy and John Murphy, sons of Mrs I 

Murphy, sailed a few days ago for Australia. 

N \ S l.i 'R. — Lieutenant and Mr.--.. Harold NaylOl to Monteie> . 

where they will be for the next fwo months. 

NIBTO. — Madame " : Ine Nleta hev 

to Brookdale, In the Banta Crai Mountains, for sevanl weeks. 

SPINNEY. Mrs K Spinney and her daughter. Miss Edith Spinney, have 

gone to Santa Cruz on a two weeks* stay. 
r \i.i, A.NT, Mre Geo r Tallant Ml recently I urban, wh. 

she has taken a cottage fot ntha. 

INTIMATIONS. 
BORDEN. Mr. Kdward P. Borden and Mips Eugenia Borden. 

Franclt vacation In the ^ oeemlte Valley. 

BUCK. Major and Mrs. Carroll Buofe will soon more from Texas to 

Washington, where Major Book win ho on duty. 
CHURCHILL. — Mr. and Mrs ■> lurchill have come from Lake 

.,.■. where they h.iv. month. 

and are at the St. Fran, is fOl ■ '• m days. 
COLEMAN Mis Robert Lord ind Miss Eda Beronio « 

of Dr. and Mrs Hany Macomber at their bos 
Benito. 



V [i ilel and Mejba I 'oi ■ !■ a re al tin i . a a del Bey, 
Santa Cruz, whe're they will be until the first of the month, when 

tliej fl 111 gO tn T:illt>.- l'oi' AUfftlSt 

DARLING. Mrs Clara Hastings Darling and her daftgliter Wra Charles 
E. Maud, win arrive next Monday from Denver. 

I 'i . i I ' ERRE. \i ' :■■ [da De i luerre and Miss Marian De Guerre are Bpend 
lug several weeks at Casa del Key al Santa Cruz, where Miss De 
Guerre is much of her time on the golf links. 

DORE. — Mrs. E. Dore, mother of Mrs. Augustus Spreckels; Mrs. Bone and 
the Misses Ruhy Bone and Edith Wooster, sailed on July loth on the 
Impemtor, coming from Franco to thls*city for the remainder of 
the summer. 

EASTLAND, — Joseph Eastland is In "Mirabel." Los Gatos. 

FORD. — Sydney and Arthur Ford are spending- a few days in Ross Valley 
as the guests of friends during the absence of their parents. 

GRAHAM.— Judge and Mrs. Thomas Graham, Miss Ethyl Graham and 
Miss Lillian Katz are spending the month at Castella. where Judge 
Graham is becoming famous an a discipie of Izaak Walton. 

GUTHRIE. — Ambassador and Mrs. George "W. Guthrie and Mrs. Guthrie's 
sister, Miss Marian Irwin, have sailed on the Mongolia for Japan, 
where Ambassador Guthrie will enter upon his new duties. 

HALL. — Mrs. A. J. Hall and Mrs. E. B. Young have been touring South- 
ern California for the past month, and are now located at Catalina 
for a few weeks. 

HARRISON.— Friends of Mrs. Carter Harrison, the beautiful and tal- 
ented wife of Mayor Carter Harrison, of Chicago, learn that she is 
coming to California with her young daughters. 

HAYNE. — Mrs. Benjamin Hayne and Mrs. George McDougall Weeks are 
enjoyed the hospitality o f Mrs. Edward J. McCuteheon at Tahoe. 

HEN SHAW. — Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Tubbs Henshaw are bound for Hono- 
lulu on their honeymoon. 

HUNT. — Judge and Mrs. J. J. Hunt and Mrs. Adam Grant have taken 
their departure for Aetna Springs, where they plan to enjoy an ex- 
tended sojourn. 

McKITTRICK.— Captain and Mrs. W. H. McKittrick, who have been at 
Del Monte for the past month, have come xip to town for a few days' 
visit with friends. 

MILLER. — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller, Miss Leslie Miller and Miss 
Marie Louise Black arc in Santa Barbara, having motored down 
there the first of the week. 

PAGE. — Mrs. Charles Page and her children are spending the summer at 
Bolinas, where the Pages have taken a cottage. 

PAYNE. — Mr. and Mrs. George Lingard Payne and their family have 
gone to Menlo Park for the remainder of the summer. 

SAB1N. — Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Sabin have gone to Gold Lake, Sierra 
County, to spend three or four weeks. 

WALLACE.— Paymaster W. T. Wallaee, Retired. TJ. S. N.. and Mrs. Wal- 
lace, have taken apartments at the Euclid, overlooking the University 
grounds. Berkeley. 

WARNER,— Miss Alice Warner has gone to Seattle, where she will par- 
ticipate in tile golf tournament, and while in the northern city she 
will be the guest of Mrs. B. E. Ainsworth. 

WILSON. — Mrs. J. C. Wilson and hei three children are established at 
Re] for a month's visit. 

WHITING.— Mr. and Mrs. Randolph V, Whiting have left for Brookdale 
to spend the week-end as the guests oi friends, 

WHITNEY.— Mrs. J. Parker Whitney and her son, Parker Whitney, will 

arrive from the East the latter part of the week. 
WRIGHT.— -Miss Helen Wright and her brothers. Harvey and Edgerton 

Wiichi, i in Tahoe, ulnae they will pass the next three 

weeks. 
rODNGBR. — Dr. and Mis, Win, Younger are coming to San Francisco 

for the late summer. 
ZOOK Mis. Edgar T. Zook, of San Rafael; Judge and Mrs. 

Char] "l Ml?s Slack, are spending several days at 

Hotel I 'el Monte. 



"The Court of Appeals has decided in our favor," an- 
nounced the young lawyer. "Hm!" mused the head of the firm 
in a melancholy way. "Case tried only once. Well" — and he 
recovered his equanimity by a great effort — "I suppose that 
we must be satisfied entirely with the decision, and let it go 
at that."-— £x. 



CALIFORNIA RODEO AT SALINAS 
July 28th to August 3. 
Don't miss the Big Week. Rough Riding, Broncho Busting, 
Daring Feats of the Range. Carnival of Sport. Reduced Round 
Trip Rates via Southern Pacific from all stations in California 
and Nevada. Sale dates, July 26th to August 3d. Return 
limit, August 4th. 



Dr. Clyde Payn* and Dr. Eugene fayne, dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny CC. Hours: 9 to 4. 



MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

Have you not always some slight repairs? Stopped 
basins, broken window cords, electrical repair work? 
We will assume all your repairs at a small monthly 
rate. Our representative will call at your request 

Phoenix Repair Company 

Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglas 822 




Willie Hogan of the Seals at the bat. 



FANS LOOK FOR THRILLS 



San Francisco baseball fans have passed through experiences 
of joy and chagrin during the past three weeks. Against Los 
Angeles, the league leaders, the Seals did so well that they 
came within one game of tying the Angels for first place. They 
failed to get on even terms by losing the last game of that 
series, and they went against Sacramento in the following week 
two games from the top. 

The series against Wolverton's team was a crusher on the 
hopes of the followers of the Seals. Out of seven games, San 
Francisco was able to win just one, and from being within 
striking distance of the top they dropped to fourth place. Port- 
land and Sacramento passed them in the race. 

The race in the Pacific Coast League at present is the best 
in the country. The six teams started this week with only six 
games separating Los Angeles, at the top, from Venice at the 
bottom of the list. Every team has a good position, and the 
second half of the season promises to bring many thrills. 

Manager Del Howard has been trying some changes in the 
infield. Cartwright, who has held down the third sack since 
the opening of the season, and whose timely hitting has been 
an important factor in the success of the club, has not been 
performing so well lately, and Howard has benched him tem- 
porarily in the hope that a rest may get him out of the slump. 
Jerry Downs, the infielder recently purchased from the Ameri- 
can Association, has been tried out at third, and may be re- 
tained there, but up to date Downs has not shown any bril- 
liancy. The San Francisco outfield has been doing well, and 
Howard has no worries in that direction. Jimmy Johnston, who 
is leading the league in run-scoring and base-stealing, is im- 
proving in his fielding, and his throwing is almost as sensational 
as his work on the bases. Willie Hogan is hitting well, and is 
also showing up well on the bases. There is no better fielder in 
the league than Hogan, and his throwing arm is all right. How- 
ard Mundorff has been among the leading batters since the sea- 
son opened, and is also one of the best base-runners in the 
Coast League. 



Oakland, after a serious slump that dropped the transbay 
club from second place to the cellar position, has taken a wel- 
come brace, and is once again fighting for a place in the first 
division. The addition of two new pitchers, and the return to 

form of Harry Abies, has improved the prospects of the Oaks. 

* * * 

The victory of the United States tennis team over the repre- 
sentatives of Germany was not unexpected, but the manner 
in which the Americans "cleaned up" the entire five games of 
the series has heightened their chances of success in the inter- 
national tourney for possession of the Dwight Davis Cup, the 
blue ribbon of the world's tennis. Maurice McLoughlin, the 
San Francisco boy who is the mainstay of the American team, 
had to play five sets before he won his match in singles. The 
German player took the first two sets from McLoughlin, and 
created a mild sensation, but Maurice came back and took the 
final three and the match, his bewildering service and his ag- 
gressive play carrying the Fatherland's representative off his 
feet. 

R. Norris Williams, America's other singles player, won in 
straight sets, and the fine work of the Harvard youth has been 
a feature of the play of the United States team in all the 
matches played so far. 

McLoughlin and Hackett won from the strong German dou- 
bles team, and the Americans made a clean sweep of the series 
by taking the other two singles matches, although they were 
not required to give the victory to the United States. Wallace 
Johnson, substituted for McLoughlin in one of the matches, 
showed that America has a strong reserve man by winning 
handily. 

The United States team will now play Canada in the final of 
the preliminaries, and the winner will play the challenge 
matches against the team of Great Britain, which now holds 
the cup. Experts concede the Canadian match to the United 
States team, and it is the general opinion that the young 
Americans will also be able to win from Great Britain, both 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



McLoughlin and Williams having shown superiority to the best 
British players in the annual tournament for the championship 
of England, in which McLoughlin, after going through the 
regular tournament, suffered defeat at the hands of Anthony 
F. t Wilding, the famous New Zealand player, who has held the 

English title for three years. 

* • • 

Fred C. Thompson, the Los Angeles pastor, was once more 
successful in the contest for the all-round athletic championship 
of the United States held at Los Angeles on Saturday last. This 
is the third time that this great athlete has carried off the hon- 
ors in the all-round competition, which is one of the most 
strenuous tests that can be given a man. Ten events are on 
the list, and the competitors are given points in accordance to 
the merit of their performances in the different events. The 
list is : 100 yards run, one mile run, 120 yards high hurdles, 
half-mile walk, high jump, broad jump, pole vault, shot put, 
hammer throw, and throwing the 56 pound weight. It is a 
severe program for a man to go through in one afternoon, and 
it speaks well for the quality of the athletic timber on this 
Coast that seven men competed in all of the events. Besides 
Thompson, the winner, the men who took part in the contest 
were Charles S. Morris, of the Olympic Club; Charles Hoen- 
sich, of the Pastime Athletic Club; R. R. Templeton and Errol 
Campbell, of Stanford University; Donahue, of Los Angeles; 

and a younger brother of the winner. 

* * » 

The committee in charge of the athletic program for the 
Portola Festival is planning to make this feature of the big 
carnival even more of a success than the one presented at the 
last festival. Already arrangements are well advanced for 
boxing and gymnastic exhibitions indoors, and outdoors there 
will be competitions in Rugby and soccer football, track and 
field athletics, golf, rowing, swimming and motor boating. 

One of the principal features of the athletic program will be 
the relay race from Sacramento to San Francisco, in which it is 
estimated that over six hundred young athletes of the Young 
Men's Christian Associations and the high schools will partici- 
pate. The committee is planning to map out the road in half- 
mile relays, and have one of the team named the Reds and the 
other the Yellows, these being the Portola colors. 

Besides the runners who will carry the message from the 
Capital to the Oakland side of the bay, there will be relays of 
swimmers ready to carry it across the bay, and runners will 
be at the water front to complete the journey to the finishing 
point in Union Square. 

* * * 

The annual yacht race from this city to Santa Cruz will start 
to-day under the auspices of the Corinthian Yacht Club. Six 
yachts have entered, and they will be sent off at 4:30 o'clock 
this morning. It is to be hoped that this race will be more 
successful than the other outside events held this year. The 
race around the Farallones for the Phillips Cup was spoiled by 
fog and light weather, and on Sunday last the annual race 
around the lightship was also spoiled by light winds, the win- 
ner taking more than seven hours and a half to make the trip. 
The Monsoon won her third consecutive victory in this race. 
The Ruby, a small boat, was second, and the Discovery took 
third place. The other competitors had to turn back, being 
unable to get to the lightship in the heavy swells with the wind 
so light that they barely had steerage way. 



BANKING 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Psld-Ur Capital $4,000,000 

I Surphu r-ud Undivided Profit* tl.4OO.0O9 

Total Renourcei (40.000,000 

OFFICERS; 
HERBERT FLF,1SH HACKER Frialdtnt 

SIO. GREKNEB1UM Chairman of tha Boar 4 



WASHINGTON DODGE 


ViCB-Prciid.nl 


JOS. FRIEDLANDIR 


Vica- Pr*§i da nt 


C. F. HUNT 


Vica-Pra*idoDt 


R. 1LTSCBUL 


Ca.hl.r 


C. R. PARKER 


AuiaUnt Caabicr 


WH. H. HIGH 


Amlitant Cathiai 


H. CHOYNSKI 


AniiUnt Caihlar 


G. R, BURDICE 


AiiiiUot Caihlar 


A. L. LANQEBMAM 


Sacratary 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO ESTABLISHED 1867 



SIR EDMUND WALKER O.V.O.,LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Manager 

JOHN A1RD Assistant General Manager 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Aggregate Resource 



$15,000,000 

12,500,000 

246,000.000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 



The new Travellers' Chequea recently issued by thla Bank are a moat 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are la- 
aued In denominations of 

•10, $20, $50. $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Francs, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Ruaala, Sweden and 
Switzerland la atated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
trlea they are payable at current rates. 

The chequea and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff. 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 

Member of the Attocilted Saving* Banks •( San Francisco 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSI TS ONLY- 
MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 
RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1913 

Assets $ 55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 

Employees' Pension Fund 158,261.32 

Number of Depositors 62, 134 

OFFICE HOURS: 10 o'clock A M (o 3 o'clock P. M.eicept Saturday I. 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday eveoings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits only 



NEW YORK 






SAN FRANCISCO 




AROUND THE WORLD BANKING SERVICE 




INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 


COMMERCIAL 


SAVINGS 
FOREIGN BRANCHES 




FOREIGN 


Yokohama 


Hankow Calcutta 


Kobe 


Cebu 


Panama 


Hongkong Manila 


Empire, C. Z. 


Shanghai 


Singapore 


Colon Canton 


Bombay 


London 




Peking 


City of Mexico 






E. W. WILSON, Manager San Francisco Branch 





20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



CITY'S BONDS MAY BE CHANGED. 

Following the investigation of the records of the Supreme 
Court relative to the changing of bonds from- large to small 
denominations, the City Attorney has informed Mayor Rolph 
that, in his opinion, the bonds now being offered in the matter 
of hospital-jail completion and water, or any other unsold 
municipal bonds, may be changed from $1,000 to any de- 
nomination desirable. 

This intelligence comes with no little satisfaction to the 
News Letter, as the first suggestion as to this method of offer- 
ing bonds by the city was made in our editorial columns. Our 
contention that the method of placing prices upon the bonds in 
the past was prohibitive as far as the small investor was con- 
cerned, has borne fruit. 

It is our opinion that the general public, the working man 
with a small amount of reserve funds, would be inclined to 
take advantage of the opportunity of obtaining more than 
banking interest by purchasing municipal bonds provided that 
the price was such as to permit of his doing so. 
■ It is to be hoped that now that the city officials have been 
assured that such a course is within their policy, that they 
will lose no time in making the change, and thus enabling the 
citizens to make investments which will make possible the early 
completion of the municipal work planned for in the issuance 
of the bonds. 



A BRILLIANT EVENT PROMISED. 

According to the promises made by the directors, this year's 
Mechanics' Fair is to assemble in San Francisco the greatest 
combine of musical and entertaining talent ever brought across 
the Rocky Mountains for one single occasion. Twenty thou- 
sand dollars is the figure at which the cost of this feature of 
the exposition is now placed, and considering the artists with 
whom negotiations are being furthered, the amount cannot fall 
a jot below this. 

That the very best the East affords may be secured, John 
Palmer Slocum, six years manager of Richard Mansfield, a 
power on Broadway and not unknown to Pacific Coast theatri- 
cal conditions, is arranging for this end of the Fair. He has 
already made definite announcement that one of the greatest 
concert bands in the country — probably Creatore's, and, if 
not his, Sousa's or Ennis' — will be sent direct from the East 
to furnish music for the Pavilion, one of the three big exposi- 
tion halls. The other srjecial entertainmenc features will be 
staged in the National Theatre, where there will also be one 
of the largest orchestras ever heard in San Francisco. This or- 
ganization will be selected from the best of local talent. Some 
of the artists with whom Slocum is negotiating are Eva Tan- 
guay, Nordica, McCormack, Harry Lauder and the Great Ray- 
mond. 



THE "MISSION PLAY" COMING. 

All San Francisco is apparently interested in the announce- 
ment published a few days ago to the effect that Gottlob, 
Marx & Co., of the Columbia Theatre, have secured for early 
presentation, the Mission Play of San Gabriel. During the 
past two years much has been printed and said of the wonder- 
ful story of early California life, which has been told by the 
players at the Mission theatre in the little town of San Gabriel, 
Southern California. Not unlike the Passion Play of Oberam- 
mergau, the Mission play attracted travelers from all parts of 
the globe. It has become one of the great features of the tour- 
ist's itinerary, and it was only after great inducements were 
offered that the directors arranged with the Columbia Theatre 
management for the presentation of the pageant-drama in 
August. All the effects, players, etc., will be brought to San 
Francisco, and the story of Father Junipero Serra, Don Gaspar 
de Portola, and all the others who participated in the making 
of early California history, will be told here just as it has been 
for the past two years at San Gabriel, in the little theatre op- 
posite the old San Gabriel Mission. George Osborne will make 
his appearance in the role of Father Junipero Serra. 



ALAMEDA BATHING BEACHES. 

Reached by Southern Pacific ferry boats to Alameda pier, 
thence by electric line to Fifth street station. Surf and Sunny 
Cove Beaches. See agents Southern Pacific. 



WIVES AS READERS. 

Booksellers, like other people, have nearly all got partners — 
or if they haven't, perhaps they ought to have. A good many 
of your partners are here, I see (alluding to the ladies), and 
if they don't interest themselves deeply and actively in your 
businesses, that's usually your fault, not theirs. My experi- 
ence of wives — I have only one of my own — my observation of 
wives is that they are never so happy as when they feel that 
they are really necessary to the prosperity of their husband's 
trade and calling. Why not turn them into readers? Are you 
afraid of their judgment? I am not. If you ask me as an au- 
thor whose opinion of my books I would rather rest my for- 
tunes upon, yours or your wives', I tell you frankly it is the 
opinion of your wives. Please don't think I am saying this 
because so many of your wives are here, and mine is here, too, 
and you think I daren't say anything else for fear of a curtain 
lecture. I say it with all soberness and sincerity — if you want 
to know what the great wide public is going to say about a 
book (especially a novel) try it on a woman, on as many wo- 
men as you can get hold of. I do. I always have done. And 
when I have had success it has been from women that the 
first fruit of it has come. — Hall Caine in T. P.'s Weekly. 



Sutter 1672 
Horn* C 3970 
Home C 4781. Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 

RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

But French Dinner In the City with Wine, $1.00. Banquet Halli and Private 

Dining Roome. Music Every Evening. 
862 Geary Street San Francisco 



J. Bergex 



G. Mailhebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

415-421 Bolh St., San Friociico (Above Keiray) Excbioit, Douflii 2*1 1 



Surprising how Many People You Meet at 
JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Special 50c Luncheon and $1 Dinner With Music 
Served in Ladies' Grill as well as Main Dining Hall 



BLANCO'S 



OTarrell and Larkin 
Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



CO-PARTNERSHIP NOTICE. 
The undersigned, co-partners doing business in the City and County of 
Francisco, State of California., under the firm name and style of Charles 
Meinecke & Co., do hereby certify: 

That the names Jn full of all the members or such co-partni I ; 
their places of residence, are as follows: 
EMIL P. MEINECKE. Trustee. University Club. San Francisco, Cal. 
HENRY KUNZ. I7_'n San Antonio Avenue. Alameda, I al. 

EMIL P. MEINECKE, Trustei 
HENRY KUNZ. 
Dated this 1st day of July, A. D. 1913. 



State of California, 
■County of Modoc — ss. 

On this 4th day of July in the year one thousand nine hundred and thir- 
teen A. D., before me, C H. Dunlap, a Notary Public in and for Bald 
County, residing therein, duly commissioned and .sworn, personally ap- 
peared kmil P. MEINECKE. Trustee, personally known to me to be the 
person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowl- 
edged to me that he executed the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. 

(Seal) C. H. DUNLAP, 

Notary Public In and for the County of Modoc, State of California. 



State of California, 

City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

On this 1st day of July, in the year ont 6 nine hundred and 

thirteen, before me, JAMES MASON, a Notary Public in and for said 
City and County, residing therein, duly commissioned and sworn, per- 
sonally appeared HENRY KUNZ, known to me i<» be the person de- 
scribed in, whose name is subscribed to, and who executed the within 
and annexed instrument, and he acknowledged to me that he executed the 
same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto sel mj hand urtd affixed 
my official seal, at my office, in the said City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, the day and vear dast above written. 

(Seal) JAMES .MASON, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Prancisi 

I 'alifornla. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



DANIELS' SOLANO CITY 

Not every artist gets a chance to work out his ideals on the 
scale that Mark Daniels has. At leasti in this generation, no 
man who makes a profession of platting municipalities has had 
an opportunity to lay out a whole city on a scale big enough 
for 75,000 people until Solano City was conceived, and Daniels 
was called upon to plat it. His work is finished, and his 
maps are in the hands of the new city's sponsors. It will re- 
quire a fixed purpose and an intelligent supervision to fulfill 
the plan, and those things are promised. If they are realized, 
California will have a new city on her map that she can be 
proud of, and the world at large can size up a community built 
as experts say it should be built. Daniels had a logical site 
and an acceptable topography to work upon. Transportation 
developments and the awakening of a tremendously produc- 
tive agricultural region back of it made such a city a neces- 
sity; the capital and faith of its promoters are going to stick 
to Solano until the "city beautiful" of Mark Daniels is a real- 
ity. The new city will be the gateway to Solano farms and 
the Sacramento Valley beyond; it will have two electric lines 
and a river-boat harbor to start with, and more railroads are 
promised. It will be only forty miles from San Francisco. 
Pretty good start for a brand new city. 



REAL ESTATE BARGAINS. 



FEAST OF LANTERNS AT PACIFIC GROVE. 

Saturday, July 19th. 
Games and amusements; water polo and other sports. Re- 
duced round trip rates from San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda 
and Berkeley, San Luis Obispo, Sacramento, Bakersfield and 
points between to Pacific Grove. Tickets on sale, via Southern 
Pacific, July 17th and 18th. Return limit, July 21st. 



STOCK RANCH 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 1,500 acres 
12 miles from San Jose, two miles from a station, on the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. About 300 acres tillable land, 
200 acres of which is mostly level, and has been sown to 
wheat, producing enormous crops. The balance is rolling 
hills, with a small piece of rough land covered with natu- 
ral grasses, affording abundance of feed during the sum- 
mer months. A creek runs through the property, and 
numerous springs give plenty of water for cattle. 
Improvements are old, but with small expenditure could 
be put in first-class condition. The place has been used 
as a stock ranch, and turned off 250 head of horses and 
beef cattle a year, and if properly equipped, would make 
a good dairy or hog ranch, being close to the railroad and 
markets. About 200 acres would be suitable for orchard. 
Price $27.50 per acre, one-half cash, balance easy terms. 

Address OWNER, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. J. J. 
Phillips, 12 Geary St., San Francisco. 



EXCHANGE 840 ACRES 

In Yuba County, located about seven miles east of the 
town of Marysville, four miles from the main line of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. This land is all level, has all 
been under cultivation, and is fenced and cross-fenced. 

The soil is of a reddish loam, uniform and deep. All 
valley land — would be desirable for most all kinds of 
fruits, including citrus or would grow alfalfa by de- 
veloping the water. 

2 wells on the place at the present time. Water stands 
within 20 feet of the surface. 

This property would make a splendid subdivision which 
would sell from $125.00 to $150.00 per acre in small tracts. 

Will exchange for Bay property and assume mortgage. 
Price, $55,000; mortgage $16,000. 

Address HEDLEY HALL, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

Private Exchange Connecting 



Phone Sutter 2230 
All C«r»r1rren1s 



FINEST DAIRY FARM IN CALI- 
FORNIA, NINETY MILES 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



ACREAGE 

750 acres (survey shows 787.5 acres), all deep river bot- 
tom sediment soil, less than two miles from a first-class 
shipping point on the Southern Pacific Railroad, within 90 
miles of San Francisco, and 9 miles south of Stockton. 
350 acres are in alfalfa, yielding six cuttings, balance in 
barley and pasture. 

IRRIGATION 

A pumping plant has been installed, equipped with a 

10-inch centrifugal pump, 18 inch steel intake pipe, taking 

water from the San Joaquin River, 40 horsepower electric 

motor, capacity 3,500 gallons per minute. 

A large canal runs through the property, and smaller 

ditches are being completed for irrigation. 

When the balance of the land is prepared, it will be 

seeded to alfalfa. The place will then carry 600 head of 

milch cows, young stock and hogs. 

IMPROVE MENTS 

Fine modern electric lighted dwelling. 
Spacious farm-house. 

New ice plant for cooling milk and refrigeration. 
Cow barn, accommodating 400 head of cows at one milk- 
ing, with storage capacity for 800 tons of hay. 
Two new silos, concrete foundations, of 1,500 tons 
capacity. 

Several small barns. 
Blacksmith shop and outhouses. 

Tank house and tank, 42,000 gallons, operated by elec- 
tricity. 

Large weighing scales. 
All necessary implements. 

STOCK 

350 head of fine young milch cows. 
25 head of work-horses. 
5 thoroughbred bulls. 

500 tons of alfalfa and barley hay in the stack. 
At the present time, 750 gallons of milk are being shipped 
daily, with a milking of 250 head. We are in a position 
to contract for all the milk produced at 15 cents per gal- 
lon, F. O. B. railroad station. 

REMARKS 

The place, with only one-half of the acreage under culti- 
vation, is paying over 12 per cent net, and when fully de- 
veloped, at a small expense, will more than double the 
present net income. This is the best acreage investment 
in California, having many natural advantages, cheap 
shipping rate to Stockton and San Francisco, free water 
for irrigation from the San Joaquin River, cheap electric 
light and power, most productive soil, and ideal climatic 
conditions. 

TERMS 

Price, $200,000. $60,000 cash, balance in four equal an- 
nual installments, with interest at 6 per cent. The profits 
of the ranch should take care of the deferred payments 
and development. 

address, HEDLEY HALL, 

21 SUTTER ST., S. F. 

J. J. PHILLIPS, 12 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 





^financial; 




Report of the 
State Controller. 



Receipts of the State government 
ror the fiscal year which ended June 
30th, according to a summary made 
public by State Controller Nye, 
were $25,052,283, which was about $3,500,000 more than for 
the year before, while the total disbursement of $22,900,416.40 
exceeded those of the year before by $4,200,000. Sales of high- 
way and harbor bonds, which amounted to $4,400,000, helped 
to swell the receipts, while the construction of roads and har- 
bor improvements contributed to the increase in expenditures. 
At the close of business on June 30th the cash in the State 
treasury and on deposit amounted to $11,669,317.55, which was 
an increase of more than $2,000,000 during the year. Corpora- 
tion taxes and other revenues of the general fund proved to 
be sufficient to meet the expenses of the government and leave 
a slight margin. The collection of inheritance taxes amounted 
to $1,536,000. 



Calendar of the 
Railroad Commission. 



The calendar of the Railroad Com- 
mission for the balance of the cur- 
rent month, beginning with Monday 
next, shows the following import- 
ant matters which will come up for discussion and decision: 

July 21st, 10 a. m. — L. Y. Montgomery et al. vs. the Fresno 
Canal and Irrigation Co., before Com. Thelen at Fresno. 

Oro Elec. Corporation and Oro Dev. Co. to dispose of 1,000 
first mortgage 6 per cent gold bonds, par value $1,000, before 
Com. Edgerton at San Francisco. 

At 2 p. m. — W. H. Frazine vs. Santa Fe Co., before Com. 
Gordon at Empire. 

July 23d, 10 a. m. — Lindsay Home Tel. Co. for permission to 
issue stock, before Com. Gordon at San Francisco. 

July 28th. — East Oakland Protective League vs. S. P. Co., 
before Com. Gordon at San Francisco. 

At 2 p. m. — Williams Water and Elec. Co. for permission to 
install water meters and change from flat rate to meter rate, 
before Com. Thelen at Williams. 

July 29th, 10 a. m. — Commission investigation into the rates, 
charges, rules and regulations of the Pac. Tel. & Tel. Co. in 
connection with the interchange telephone service within the 
State of California, before Com. en banc, at San Francisco. 

Pac. Tel. & Tel. Co. for permission to change its system of 
toll rates, before Com. en banc at San Francisco. 



The recently appointed Industrial 
Minimum Wage Welfare Commission of Oregon has 

Scale Set. made its first decision in the matter 

of setting a minimum wage scale 
for women. The case arose out of the investigation relative to 
the conditions governing employment in the Oregon Packing 
Company's plant in Portland. 

A number of the women workers employed in the plant re- 
cently walked out, thus causing the commission to interview 
them and to examine the books and plant of the company with 
a view to settling the differences or remedying any evils that 
existed. 

Finally, as a result of ihe efforts of the commission, the com- 
pany agreed to pay a flat or minimum wage to all their women 
employees of $1 per day' with the piece work continuing. If a 
woman or girl does over a certain amount of work she will be 
paid one dollar, and thereafter what she earns. The present 
rate in effect for piece work will continue. 



Decisions of the 
Railroad Commission. 



Notes of recent important decisions 
of the California Railroad Commis- 
sion are as follows : The Commis- 
sion has granted authority to the 
Southern California Edison Co. to issue 30,000 shares of its 
common stock. The company will offer 10,000 shares to its 
own stockholders and a syndicate is being formed to under- 



write the remaining 20,000 shares. The order of the Commis- 
sion provides that the stock shall be sold for not less than $80 
per share. 

The Commission has granted leave to the Beaumont Gas 
and Power Co. to issue a mortgage note in the sum of $5,000 
for the purpose of paying off existing indebtedness. 

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company has applied to the 
Commission for authority to refund existing short term notes 
in the sum of $569,000. 

The Bear Gulch Water Company, at Menlo Park, has filed its 
reply to the complaint made by water users against its service 
and the quality of the water. The company states that it is 
planning to enlarge its supply. 

The Commission has granted authority to the Central Pacific 
Railway to construct a side track at grade across Vallejo street 
and an overhead crossing across the county road in Niles, Ala- 
meda County. 

The Commission has granted authority to the Honey Lake 
Valley Mutual Telephone Association to issue promissory notes 
in the sum of $10,000. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



New York Stock Eiehaue 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Cbictt o Board of Trade 

TV Stock aad Bond Exchange. Sin Fraadec* 



Maui Office 

HILL! BUILDING 

Sal Frtoeiico. California 



Brueb Offioee 

Let Angeles Sao Diego 
Goronado Beacb Portland, Ore. 
Seattle. Waah Vancouver. B. C. 



INVESTMENT SECURTTIES 
Established iljl 

SUTRO &, CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Retard to Any Security 

Will be Furnished Upon Request 

Mambara— Tht San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchanga 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 
Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and inspect motors. 

Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



nni ICU C"C 623 Sacramento Street, between 
DnUOn LO Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets. Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY. 
Let us guide you In your selections. 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers In 
The Hloheit Class PAPER For Offioe statloner > f 

Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone Kearny ur.i Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Conner lions With All Railroads 

Main Office: 625-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




She — Why do you work so hard? He — I am too ner- 
vous to steal. — Cornell Widow. 

Madge — Who helped you make such a fool out of that 

poor young man? Marjorie — He did. — Judge. 

"Have you hot water in your house?" "Have I? My 

dear boy, I'm never out of it." — Baltimore American. 

"Did Sir Alfred Murgatroyd come over here on busi- 
ness?" "Oh, no: it is only a pleasure trip. He came over here 
to swear at the country !" : — Ex. 

"What is your attitude on the tariff?" "Something," 

replied Senator Sorghum, "like that of a man who is walking 
a tight-rope." — Washington Star. 

Tillie Clinger says that the only reason she has for 

suspecting her new landlady is a suffragette is because she ar- 
sons the biscuits half the time. — Dallas News. 

The train that comes into Tickville every week will soon 

begin to run late, as the blackberry vines along the right-of- 
way are showing signs of a large crop. — Exchange. 

— ^Brown — What is the charge against the mi-.ister? Rob- 
inson — He is charged with conduct unbecoming a clergyman. 
It seems that he has been attending sacred concerts. — Ex. 

"Does Jinks live in an aristocratic section of the city?" 

"Yes; there is not an hour during the day or night when the 
air is free from the odor of burning gasoline." — Buffalo Ex- 
press. 

Son of the House (to caller)— I wanted to see you 'cos 

father says you made yourself. Caller — Yes, my lad, and I'm 
proud of it. Son of the House— B-but why did you do it like 
that? — Punch. 

Trotter — While I was in England I met one nobleman 

who actually believed in the abolition of the House of Lords. 
Blotter — Did you, really? Trotter — Yes. He said it was such 
a nuisance to go there. — Puck. 

Old Gotrox (savagely) — So you want to marry my 

daughter ? Do you think two can live as cheaply as one ? 
Young Softly (slightly embarrassed) — I — I hardly think you 
will notice any difference, sir. — Puck. 

"Your boy stole a barrel of apples from me the other 

day." "Dear me! I wonder where that boy will wind up?" 
"I think he'll wind up in the legislature. He talked me into 
believing that it was all right." — Courier-Journal. 

First Boarder — I understand that the landlady is to take 

a trip to the West. Second Boarder — Is that so? If the train 
would stop long enough at the stations, she could give the rail- 
way restaurant people some great points. — Exchange. 

Farmer Haiback — This dry weather's burnin' up the 

corn. Mr. Citiman — Those clouds over yonder look as if 
they would bring a heavy rain. Farmer Haiback — Yes, an' the 
denied rain will spile the sweet potatoes. — Excha 



RED CROSS WIPING RAGS 

AND 

COTTON WASTE 

for automobiles and engineers. 
AUTOMOBILE OILS 

WEEKS - HOWE- EMERSON CO. 

51 MARKET STREET. S F 




City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. w. P. Agnew has moved his office to this city, and Is now to be 
found in Room 424. Flood Bu dding, 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Oc tavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corne r Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN t ■S-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law. Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole— painless — without knife. Bunions and In- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg., 830 M arket St. Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. £17 Montgomery St., above Bush, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 601. 

UNITED STATES BRANCH STATEMENT OF THE CONDITIONS AND 
Affairs of the PALATINE INSURANCE CO., LTD., of London, Eng- 
land, on the 31st day of December, A. D. 1912, and for the year ending 
on that day. Published pursuant to the Provisions of Section 611 of 
the Political Code and compiled from the annual statement filed with 
the Insurance Commissioner of the State of California. 



Assets. 

Cash Market Value of all Stocks and Bonds owned by Com- 
pany 52,624,640.00 

Cash in Banks 204,369.17 

Interest due and accrued 31,634.00 

Agents' Balances representing business written subsequent to 

October 1, 1912 390,033.37 



TOTAL ASSETS $3,260,576.64 

Liabilities. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid 24,238.00 

Losses in process of Adjustment or in Suspense 99,529.68 

Losses resisted, including expenses 23,683.00 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running one year or less, 

50 per cent 628,332.41 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running more than one year, 

pro rata 1,087,985.02 

Estimated Taxes hereafter payable based upon this year's 

business 35.fl61.62 

Commissions and Brokerage due or to become due 42,744.25 

Re-insurance Premiums and Return Premiums 48,045.46 

All other liabilities 10,385.82 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $2,000,006.26 

Income. 

Net cash actually received for Fire premiums $1.8i4,547.26 

Received from interest and dividends on Bonds, Stocks, Loans, 

and from all other sources 119,794.42 

profit on sale or maturity of Ledger Assets 2,498.01 

Received from Home Office 2,628.21 



TOTAL INCOME $1,939,462.90 



Expenditures. 

Net amount paid for Fire Losses $ 

Expenses of adjustment and settlement of losses 

Paid or allowed for Commission or Brokerage 

Paid for Salaries, Fees, and other charges for officers. 

clerks, etc 

P:iid for State, National and Local taxes 

- decrease 111 book value of Ledger Assets 

Remitted to Home Office 

All other Expenditures 



917.431.87 
25.377.17 
413,274.93 

185,494.67 

iO • i 

12,868.35 
■un.L'iir,.2l 
:i«.-,m2.9ci 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES $2,081,876.04 



Losses incurred during the year (FIRE) $966,513.12 



Risks and Premiums. 

Fire Risks Premiums 

Net amount of Risks written during the year..? 

count of Risks expired during the year... 224,583.881 

in force December 31, 1912 297.803,001 3.272.640.15 

A. H. WRAT. U. S. Manager. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of February, 1913. 

H. R. RAY. Notary Public 





MAYERL E'S GERMAN EYEWATER 

is a perfectly harmless eye remedy 

for strained. Inflamed, sore, watery 

painful, burning, smarting, blurring. 

itchy eyes; red. gluey or heavy lids; 

floating gpots. injured eyes, indispensable for mechanics exposing their eyes 

to the wind, sun and dust. At druggists 50c: by mall 6Sc, direct from 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Fxpert Optician and Optometrist 

960 Market St., San Francisco 
Catrter Member of America* Association of Opticum (Established 18 Years) 

Mayerles Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers <a chemical cloth). large size 3 for 25c 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 




momm 



-- ■• ■'.-tf 



BY BURLEIGH DAVISON. 

California's Natural Park Open to Motorists 

With the news that the Yosemite National Park will be open 
to automobilists after August 1st, and that the Sequoia National 
Park is to be opened to them at once, California takes the first 
rank amongst those States that have scenic parks of surpassing 
grandeur, free to all kinds of travel. 

The long fight that the automobile dealers and automobilists 
have made to gat the privilege of touring through the Yosemite 
Valley is one of the finest examples of modem progressive ideas 
triumphing over old, conservative notions, and the fact that 
they won the right to tour through the valley only after every 
effort had been made to keep them out, makes the victory all 
the more remarkable. 

What the opening of the Yosemite National Park will mean 
to the State in the way of increased motor and augmented tour- 
ist travel, at this date is hard to say, but it is safe to state that 
thousands of motorists from all over the country will avail 
themselves of the chance to visit this scenic wonderland, as 
soon as they know that they can tour through Yosemite without 
a thousand petty restrictions to mar the pleasure of the trip. 

Why the automobilists were denied the privilege of the 
valley so long is one of those mysteries that cannot be ex- 
plained by a surface reading of conditions, but after an exami- 
nation of actual conditions, and a look into the many private 
little enterprises, whose owners feared the advent of the motor 
car into the valley, it is easily seen where most of the opposi- 
tion came from. However, all is well that ends well, and Cali- 
fornia motorists as a unit are more than thankful for the right 
to drive through the valley. 

The opening of the Sequoia National Park will also mean 
much to local and visiting motorists, and will help spread the 
fame of our State's wonderful scenery far and wide. Too much 
cannot be said in praise about these new scenic drives. 

* * * 

Poor Crossings Rack Motor Cars 

Many complaints are heard these days about the poor con- 
dition of the street crossings of some of our principal thorough- 
fares. Even with the best possible kind of crossings, where 
car tracks are on the streets, the wear on tires and springs of 
automobiles is severe, but when these intersections are allowed 
to become running ruts, alongside of the railroad beds, the 
damage to motor cars is extreme. 

As there are so many cars in use in modern street traffic, it 
should be the first duty of the authorities in charge of the 
thoroughfares to see that this important part of their work is 
well done. Not only do motor cars suffer from the poor con- 
dition of crossings, but all wheeled traffic is affected, and in 
addition to making the work of teaming much harder and more 
expensive, the neglected crossings become sources into which 
dirt and rubbish accumulate, to be blown about by the first 
high wind that strikes there. By all means let the automobile 
public get together and strive to have not cnly better streets, 
but better crossings and protection around street railroad inter- 
sections. 

* • • 
Coast Awaits Coming of Hooslers 

The entire Pacific Coast is anxiously awaiting the coming of 
the Indiana Automobile Manufacturers, who are en route for 
this coast on one of the longest tours that any organization of 
this kind has ever taken. 

From every point of view the present tour is one of the most 
important events of this kind that has ever taken place, and 
outside of the immediate effect it will have upon the motor car 
industry out on the Pacific Coast, it will be the means of further- 
ing a better understanding amongst dealers, manufacturers and 
the general public than any other single factor. 

When a body of representative men like the Indiana Auto- 



mobile Manufacturers get out and see for themselves just what 
the United States territorially and in population means. When 
they realize, as they will after the tour, the wonderful potential 
possibilities of this great land, and when they recognize that the 
Pacific Coast is an integral part of this big country of ours, 
they will feel a deeper and keener sense of unity with the aims 
and ideals of the west. 

From a good roads standpoint no single event of recent years 
ranks in importance with this tour, and it will be the means of 
educating the States and cities through which the tourist travels 
to the need of a great national highway. 

With funds coming in regularly for the Lincoln Highway, 
that big broad road that will span the continent from coast to 
coast, and with the enthusiasm of the Hoosier automobile fac- 
tory men adding impetus to the movement, it looks as if we 
are going to have something big and fine in the line of a 
National Highway in the near future. 

It is to be hoped that California will give the Indianans 
such a welcome that they will want to come out again to see 
us, and that will make them sing the praises of the Golden 

State wherever they go. 

* * * 

Auto Club Needs Infusion of New Blood 

The coming of the Indiana Automobile Manufacturers ought 
to be an excuse for the bringing to life of the Automobile Club 
of California. While the present members seem to have no 
special interest in things in general — merely keeping the club 
alive in name only — yet this is the time. There is a necessity 
for an automobile club that is an active organization, in this 
city. The near approach of the affair demands that this city 
should be represented by such an organization, and there is 
no better time than the present for active work in this direc- 
tion. There is no necessity for a new organization. The Auto- 
mobile Club of California has the name and age, and it is only 
necessary to put new blood in it to make it as good as any 
other club that could be formed. 

It is up to the president and secretary of the club to take 
notice of this fact, and at once to call the members together and 
see that a delegation is sent to the State line to meet the com- 
ing motorists from Indiana. And after that to keep up the 
meetings and interest in the club, and prepare to get things in 

shape to handle the incoming tourists that will arrive in 1915. 

* * * 

Should Establish Motor Touring Bureau 

One of the things that the California State Automobile Asso- 
ciation should do, and one that would greatly facilitate the pro- 
gress of the State in getting settlers and visitors out here, 
would be the establishment of a bureau whereby all traveling 
automobilists could come and get reliable and detailed infor- 
mation pertaining to the various tours in and about the State. 

This work, which would do tremendous good, could be car- 
ried out at a very small expense, and would be the means of 
attracting motor tourists here from many States. At the pres- 
ent time, though California has beyond doubt some of the 
finest scenic country in the world for automobilists to tour 
through, there is no definite way for Eastern or foreign motor 
car owners to know the relative merits of the different drives. 
There are many details, such as the mileage, road conditions, 
supply stations, hotel accommodations, etc., that are not avail- 
able to strangers within our gates, or the tourist contemplating 
a trip to California. 

With headquarters in the principal cities of the State, where 
all this data could be kept on hand, with some reliable agency 
in the Eastern cities supplied with maps, booklets, telling of 
the different tours and other information, there would be 
hundreds of automobilists who would come to this State yearly 
who now go elsewhere. This is a movement that well deserves 
the earnest consideration of the Automobile Association of 

California. 

* * * 

A. A. A. Pathflndlng Trips for 1918 

On July 1st, the official pathfinding trip of the American 
Automobile Association started with the Indiana-to-the-Pacific 
Coast tour, and with W. O. L. Westgarde in charge of the work 
for the A. A. A. in place of his brother, a change made in the 
arrangements at the eleventh hour. 

On account of the loss of last year's survey notes, somewhere 
between Oakley, Kan., and St. Louis. Mo., a resurvey of that 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



part of the Midland Trail which is being followed by the Indi- 
ana tourists will be necessary. 

As the above is the only link in the three transcontinental 
trails routed by Westgarde in his Pathfinder in 1912, the im- 
portance of getting this data in shape for the A. A. A. publica- 
tion of this important subject is apparent, and when it is ready 
will supply motorists and the public with a mass of reliable in- 
formation on American roads that will be invaluable. 

Making the Streets Safe for Children 

A movement has been started in Massachusetts by an or- 
ganization called the Automobile Legal Association, for the 
instruction of children in rules of safety when using the streets, 
and from reports so far received, the work done by this asso- 
ciation is meeting with gratifying results. .A set of ten rules 
has been prepared, telling children just what to do when cross- 
ing streets in case they should meet with automobiles. How 
they should look to the left and right before venturing on the 
street. For them not to play on the streets, as the streets are 
made for vehicle traffic, etc.* and other wholesome warnings. 

Thousands of copies of these rules have been sent to the 
schools of the State, and the co-operation of the teachers 
has been assured. No better work than this could be devised 
for the protection of children in the streets, and some such or- 
ganization here would be the means of doing tremendous good. 

* * * 

Local Motor Circles Await Touring Hooslers 

Scarcely has the noise and excitement attending the recent 
Panama-Pacific road race died away along Automobile Row 
when the air is again vibrating with feverish activity over the 
expected arrival of the big party of Indiana tourists, who will 
soon make this city a flying visit. It seems too bad that, after 
crossing the continent to come here, the Indianans could only 
stay with us for three days, but as that is the case, we will have 
to make the best of it, and crowd all our hospitality into those 
few short hours. 

* * * 

Many Dealers to Welcome Indiana Manufacturers 

Many motor car dealers of this city will go to the State line 
to welcome the Indiana Automobile Manufacturers to Califor- 
nia. This is the proper spirit to show to our visitors, and the 
more automobilists who can take the trip the bigger will the 
tourists feel their welcome is here. 

* * » 

Looking Forward to Activity 

Automobile Row is loking forward to considerable activity 
as soon as the present summer quietness has passed. In fact, 
with the readjustment of Automobile Row, after this year's 
wholesale moving epidemic, it looks as if the automobile in- 
dustry will be able to settle down to a good business year. 

* * * 

Race Returns Make Hit 

"The returns from the race on July Fourth proved a very 
popular idea," says Henry D. McCoy, of the Chanslor & Lyon 
Company. 

"At one time during the day we counted 118 dealers and au- 
tomobile men in the store, besides thirty or forty interested 
parties whom we did not know. Along the curb in front of the 
big sjiow windows on Van Ness avenue was gathered a crowd 
who watched the bulletins as they were displayed. As many 
as thirty automobiles were lined up in the street when the re- 
port of the finish of the race came in over the special wire 
leased by Chanslor & Lyon Company. 

"All in all, it was really like a big party, for the men knew 
each other, and those who did not, under the excitement of the 
moment soon got acquainted. Messages were coming in con- 
stantly from the checking stations along the extensive route, 
telling what drivers were in and giving their time and what was 
happening to them. 

"With the aid of flashes by telegraph giving the time of the 
drivers, we were also able to post the winner's time within a 
few seconds before it had come to us from Sacramento. In 
fact, we were kept so accurately in touch with the movements 
of the various cars that we had posted their time before they 
themselves knew it." 



Meet Many Parties Headed for California 

"We are in receipt of a letter from A. L. Rhoden, of Stock- 
ton, who is driving his Mitchell car to Rochester, New York, ' 
says O. C. McFarland, of the Osen-McFarland Automobile 
Company, Mitchell dealers on the Pacific Coast. 

"It is as follows: T have not written you before, owing to 
my time being taken up with a battle royal over the deserts, 
mountains, plains and bad roads, having struck a storm period 
in this section. I am writing this ■ from the top of Mount 
Sherman, Wyoming. After leaving Reno, the roads are not in 
very good condition, as they are not being cared for as they 
should be. The washouts are never broken down and leveled, 
which means a sudden drop of three or four feet and straight 
up again. However, the road is fairly well logged, and the 
people are wide awake to the possibilities of the National 
Highway coming through this section, being for the most part 
quite willing to do anything. In some places in Wyoming, 
roads are now being built for automobiles. Mr. Hoag, of Ely, 
-, Nevada, has the roads in that State properly labeled. This is 
no, small task, as is indicated by the fact that it is necessary 
at times to run sixty miles without water. Gasoline in this 
section is selling very reasonably in view of the fact that it 
has to be freighted sixty and seventy miles. 

" 'In many places in each State through which we have come 
the opportunity offered for good time, and at no place either in 
the desert or mountains, is there a lack of material close at hand 
with which to build a wonderful overland road. I have taken 
some fine pictures, which I shall forward at once. 

" 'So far, we have met seventy-five automobile parties headed 
for California, the majority of whom seem to be home-seekers, 
and are people of means. Some of them started west by the 
old Santa Fe trail and had to turn back and come over this 
route." 

* * * 

Metal Garages Offer Many Advantages 

"The beauty and neatness of metal products fit them for 
any desired location," says Manager Mannist of the Metal 
Shelter Company of San Francisco. "Being strictly fireproof, 
all danger of damage to their contents or adjacent property is 
eliminated. The low cost enables all automobile owners to 
give their cars the real protection the large investment justifies, 
and enjoy the convenience of having their own garage. 

"The material used is heavy-gauge galvanized steel. The 
wall sections are embossed in dressed stone pattern, and the 
roof sheets are stamped to represent fluted tile. 

"For outing cottages, extra quarters for hotels and resorts, 
settlers' cabins, hunting lodges, fresh air sleeping or living 
quarters, the Pruden System offers ideal advantages. It in- 
sures absolute security of person or property against fire, wind, 
weather, thieves or lightning." 

» » * 

Non-Stop Packard Motor on Wheels 

Following its official non-stop run of 300 hours at the Auto- 
mobile Club of America, the Packard "38" motor, which estab- 
lished this world's record, is prolonging its endurance test by 
additional mileage on the road. After the completion of the 
block test, which more than doubled the previous world's rec- 
ord of 132 hours, the motor was sealed under the observance 
of the technical committee of the Automobile Club, and re- 
placed in the chassis from which it had been taken. It was 
then run at full speed on the Long Island Speedway. 

From the metropolis the car containing the motor was driven 
at a high rate of speed to Philadelphia, where it is now the 
center of much interest occasioned by its endurance record. It 
still carries the seals which show it has undergone no adjust- 
ments. 

* * * 

Rapid Growth of Klssel-Kar Company 

"The growth in popularity of the Kissel-Kar has, when you 
come to think of it, been almost magical," says H. F. Noake. 
"Only a few years ago, Kissel-Kars were produced in a building 
50x100 feet, no larger than an ordinary garage. To-day two 
big plants at Hartford and Milwaukee, aggregating more than 
a half million square feet of working floor space, are neces- 
sary to supply the demands for Kissel pleasure cars and 
trucks. The answer ? A good car plus good service to owners 
— that's all." 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



Goodyear Breaker Strip Best Combination of Fabrics 

P. W. Litchfieid, of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, 
in speaking of the advantages of the breaker strip in tires, 
recently said : 

"When sharp stones or glass cut the tread rubber, in many 
cases the abrasion is stopped at the breaker strip, preventing 
the water and dirt getting down to the main fabric, thereby pre- 
venting the tire being water soaked or sand blistered to quite 
an extent. As the breaker strip is the nearest fabric to the road, 
it receives all the cuts, water, dirt and sand, and should be 
made, as far as possible, to resist any damage caused by 
them. For this reason, we wish an open fabric which can be 
more effectively united to the rubber. On the other hand, we 
wish a closely twisted yarn, tightly woven, to avoid becoming 
spongy when water soaked, thereby letting go from the rubber. 
We believe that our rivet fabric is the best compromise be- 
tween these two qualities, as it is made from closely twisted 
yarn, tightly woven to make it as waterproof as possible, but 
leaving large holes at intervals through it, which results in the 
formation of large rivets of rubber, making a fabric which is 
more closely united to the rubber than any ordinary loose 
woven fabric, and at the same time it is more waterproof after 
the tread has been cut. 

"Always bear in mind when you have breaker strip trouble 
that undoubtedly this has saved the tire from much more serious 
injury at a much more vital point in its construction. To ob- 
tain the best results from breaker strips, there should be a 
cushion of rubber between the breaker strip and the main 

fabric of the tire." 

* * * 

Royal Auto Club Tests Tires 

"A set of four puncture proof tires manufactured by the 
Lee Tire and Rubber Company, Conchohocken, Pa., have re- 
cently been submitted to an official test by the Royal Automo- 
bile Club of Great Britain and Ireland," says Henry D. Mc- 
Coy, head of the Chanslcr & Lyon Company. 

"The four tires to undergo this, measured 815 mm. by 105 
mm. with all-rubber Lread, and were fitted to a car weighing 
2,853 pounds, and which was loaded with 353 pounds more. 
The tires were inflated to the following pressures : near front, 
77 pounds per square inch; off-front, 75 pounds per square 
inch; near back tire, 67 pounds per square inch; off back, 69 
pounds per square inch. 

"A distance of 207.8 miles was run without stopping on 
Brooklar.ds Track at an average speed of 43.76 miles per 
hour. At the end of this distance the temperature of the wall 
of the near back tire was taken and found to be 36 deg. C, or 
97 deg. F. ; that of the outside air being HVjj deg. C, or 53 
deg. F. 

"After finishing this test, a non-puncture test was given the 
same tires under the same conditions. Two seven-eighths inch 
boards 6 feet long and 11% wide, were provided. Two inch 
wire nails were driven through, so as to project about l l / 2 
inches. These nails were so placed as to be approximately 1% 
inches from one another. The boards were placed upon a 
track and the car was driven steadily over them five times in 
the following manner. Along the boards lengthwise twice over 
same track; along the boards lengthwise over a different track, 
and twice across the boards. After the test the nails were 
found to be bent, and in many cases driven back through the 
boards. The tires were not punctured, and after standing all 
night, were still at approximately the same pressure." 

• • • 

Portable Garage Cuts Motoring Expense 

"The most expensive part of motoring is the cost of garag- 
ing," says Manager Mannist, of the Metal Shelter Company. 
"The owner who has a garage of his own, and drives the car 
himself, you will find spends quite some time going over the 
engine and thoroughly examining bolts and nuts. He becomes 
acquainted with those parts which are inclined to loosen, and 
by keeping them tightened, prevents the mechanism from be- 
coming out of alignment, thereby saving serious repairs. The 
average owner uses the public garage. When through with the 
car for the day, he drives into the garage and leaves the car. 
The next morning he gets his car and drives it again. He hasn't 
looked at it; he takes it for granted that it is all right. Motor- 
ists are coming to realize that this custom is too much of a 
hazard." 



Extra Tires Add Weight to Car 

"A man who has an automobile that is not equipped by the 
makers with attachments to carry spare tires, rims or wheels, 
does not realize that he is constructing an engineering problem 
when he puts those spares on the car in any place that seems 
convenient to him," says B. H. Pratt, of the Fisk Rubber Com- 
pany, this city. 

"In other words, the average man does not know what it 
means to add the weight of a couple of tires and rims to the 
load of a car, and that unless the maker has arranged for the 
carrying of this extra weight, the wearing qualities of the car 
are apt to be considerably affected thereby. 

"It is not a matter of merely deciding whether it is more con- 
venient to put the tires at the rear end of the car rather than 
at the side. Unless these matters have been considered and 
planned for before the car has been turned out and delivered, 
some very fundamental points of engineering law are ignored. 

"A great many automobiles now for the first time carry the 
spare tires at the rear. Originally, this was done only with 
roadsters or cars of the raceabout type, but latterly it began 
to be done more and more with machines used for touring. 
Carrying spares on the roof of a closed car naturally went out 
of fashion when demountable rims came in vogue. Two such 
tires with rims make rather too much of a load for the ordinary 
car roof to bear." 



Interesting Trip In a Reo 

One of the most interesting motoring tours taken this season 
has just been completed by R. C. McNally, of Roswell, Mexico. 
McNally, in a letter to Norman DeVaux, the head of the Reo- 
Pacific Company, Pacific Coast agents for the Reo, says : 

"I have just returned from a trip to Los Angeles, to which 
place I drove a new Reo the Fifth. I do not think that a car 
could be put to a harder test than we put this car. We were 
only seven days on the road, and we never ran over seven hours 
a day. The distance covered was 1,280 miles, and on the 
whole trip we only used 76 gallons of gasoline, 6V 2 quarts of 
lubricating oil, and two quarts of water. 

"We went by way of Yuma, Arizona, and struck right across 
the desert. If any one contemplating the purchase of a car 
could have seen the way this little boat bucked these sand- 
drifts for 47 miles, they surely would have been convinced that 
the Reo could not be duplicated anywhere for twice the money. 

"When we reached the Imperial Valley of California, we 
found that the spring rains had been pouring down for over a 
week, and that heavy gumbo mud did not look very good. But 
as long as the car didn't seem to care, we made up our minds 
to tackle the 62 miles of it. We not only tackled it, but we 
pulled over it in less than five hours. 

"Our tool kit was never unrolled on the whole trip from Ros- 
well, New Mexico, to Los Angeles, and I know that is more 
than any car can say that has come through there in the last 
two months. We ran as long as 60 to 70 miles on second speed 
through that sand, and never boiled the water." 



Motor Car Proven by Service 

"The true worth of a motor car is proven only by its daily 
service, and by this is meant comfort, reliability, endurance and 
economy," says Harvy Goodwin, of the Dillon-Goodwin Auto- 
mobile Company, agents for the Westcott car. 

"Given these four attributes of the motor car, it is interest- 
ing to note, viewed in the light of human nature, which one is 
the most important in the mind of the car owner or prospec- 
tive motor car buyer. True, all four are absolutely essential 
to a marketable motor car to-day; yet one of those transcends 
the others by far, although the average motorist may not have 
thought of it, but is well aware of it sub-consciously, never- 
theless. 

"A careful analysis of the four necessary qualities of a 
motor car, comfort, reliability, endurance and economy, has 
clearly demonstrated that comfort to the motorist comes first. 

"For forty-four years the Westcott Motor Car Company has 
been making automobiles for the man or woman who wants 
genuine comfort, and by comfort we mean reliability, power, 
service, endurance and above all, economy of operation." 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



Elwood Haynes En Route with Tourists 

Traveling with the Haynes contingent of the Indiana Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers who are touring from that State to Cali- 
fornia, Elwood Haynes, the builder of "America's First Cars,'' 
in a lecture before Denver's local civic bodies gave an inter- 
esting account of some of his impressions. 

"When I built my first car in 1893 and 1894 the first thing 
that impressed me after the tests had been made on July 4th 
was the important part the road question was going to play in 
the future development of the automobile. Since the day I 
took my first ride in a 'horseless carriage' a great change has 
taken place all over the land, a great movement for the better- 
ment of the roads of the nation has swept over the land, making 
the highways of the country one hundred per cent better than 
those of a couple of decades ago. 

The growth of the good roads movement, however, has not 
kept up with the improvement in motor cars, nor in the ratio of 
the increased use of them. However, the people now realize 
that good roads mean better social as well ai commercial con- 
ditions, and they are demanding better highways all over the 
land." 

* * * 

Wins With Water In Magneto 

The Buick car which in the recent Panama-Pacific race car- 
ried the number "45" and which finished second in the memor- 
able contest, defeating many makes of high priced cars, owing 
to the fact that some water got into the magneto during the 
early part of the race, lost considerable time en route fixing up 
the damage. 

Waterman and Perry, who drove the Buick, as the car reached 
Fresno, jumped out and started to look for trouble. After 
inspecting motors, cylinders, etc., they at last found that some 
water had lodged in the magneto and had been responsible for 
their troubles on the road. After this had been remedied, the 
Buick sailed away on her course and captured second place in 
the gruelling contest. 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 186S 

Announces the removal of their Offices and Factory to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sts. 
Phone Prospect 80 

Where their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery of 
the best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



Flsk Rubber Company's New Booklet 

"The Fisk Rubber Company has just issued a booklet en- 
titled "Veteran Fisk Tires," and this interesting booklet, pro- 
fusely illustrated, is attracting much attention among motor car 
owners," says B. H. Pratt, head of the Fisk Rubber Company 
on the Pacific Coast. 

"The tires shown in the booklet have been selected from 
representative Fisk products. We have had submitted to us, 
and have eliminated photographs of tires that have given ex- 
treme mileage. We could cite instances where Fisk tires have 
run 40,000 miles, one where the original four tires have all 
given 28,000 miles, etc., but these are exceptional. Any repu- 
table tire manufacturer can report these rare cases. 

"The direct factory service which is at the disposal of each 
of our customers is consistent with the quality of the Fisk pro- 
duct. A repair shop, fitted with every modern facility for this 
work, and in charge of factory trained experts, is maintained at 
each branch. These shops play an important part in our direct 
factory service plan. Customers profit not only from our 
knowledge of how to repair but also from honest advice as to 
how to avoid repairs." 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine. 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
» » r-r-\ r~"\ | If you want to reduce your oil 

MoloRoL — 

Use MoToRoL 
''It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich JS. Tiros 

Best in 'the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 

341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Com Atoms 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 
CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 


PEART & EL.KINGTON 

VULCANIZING *-*—»•» 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Full factory equipment oo all Pack- 

lliM/umnii ards. OlJsmobiles. Cotes. Thomas and 

HOOVhK Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four — Si4 to SiS. Under 

AIIVII IARY ^PRINC". Rr compression by heavy loads, rough 

AUAILIAK1 arKllNVj Ot ,„.ds or bumps, t'nder all cor..: 

rides as easv as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCk ABSORBER slble to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 

6i7TurkSt.. San Francisco 


FREE FROM CARBON 

PANHARD U H. A B. I. BILL. 

s-~\ T T 543 Golden Oate Ave. 
^S •*• •*— ' San Francisco. Cal. 


Machinists and Engineer* 

KFFNAN RROS Auton,ob " e Repilr1nt ' spedlltr 

IXLLMnlX LJIXWO. ,,„ Golden Gate Avenue, be! Hyde 

and Lai kin Streets 
Phones: Franklin Me). Hesse J ears 


AMERICAN THERMOS BOTTLE 

THERMOS company 

Thermos Building. New York City 

BOTTLES. CARAFES * n<1 

MOGENSON WELLS CO. 

And LUNCH KITS Phelan Bide.. San Francises 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



Cross Country Makes Remarkable Tour 

Major R. B. Grubbs, of the Medical Corps, recently drove his 
Cross Country car 1885 miles along the Pacific Coast between 
San Francisco and Tia Juana, Mexico. Major Grubb's car is 
completely fitted for camping, after the adequate fashion of 
the army, but it also embodies one feature that is altogether an 
innovation. A stove is incorporated in the machine, which con- 
sists of six compartments,- all of which are built around the ex- 
haust pipe in a manner to furnish all with heat. 

A start was made at San Francisco, and the Coast route fol- 
lowed to Los Angeles via Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo and 
Santa Barbara. The tour continued south through San Juan 
Capistrano, Delmar, La Joila, San Diego to Tia Juana. Most 
of these roads were in good condition, and touring a pleasure. 
A great variety of scenery was passed through, including 
mountains, beautiful, fertile valleys and virgin forests. 

Returning, the party turned inland, passing through Escon- 
dido, Temecila, Elsinore to Riverside, Redlands and San Ber- 
nardino, thence to Los Angeles. Taking the road followed by 
the fifty race drivers on the Fourth of July, the tourists pursued 
the winding, narrow mountain roads that twist maze-like 
through the San Francisquito Canyon until reaching Bakers- 
field. After braving the hot sands and winds of the desert the 
journey turned toward Tehachapi, where a tour of the valley 
was made ; then to the north, home. 



Chandler Cars Expected by End of July 

"Work at the Chandler factory is progressing with all pos- 
sible speed, and shipment of cars will be made not later than 
July 15th," says S. G. Chapman, who has taken the agency for 
the Chandler car on the Pacific Coast. 

"I expect several carloads of Chandler cars about the last of 
July, and not later than the first of August. Judging from 
present indications, it will be much. more difficult to get cars 
than it will be to dispose of them. We are booking orders 
right along for agencies throughout the West, and for many 
individuals as well. I have realized for a long time that a 
light-weight, high-grade six-cylinder car would fill a much felt 
want, for from personal contact with car owners I find that 
there exists a keen demand for a car of this type. Aside from 
the first cost of a heavy six-cylinder car, the upkeep for oil, 
tires and gasoline involves a tremendous expense. Even men 
of means object to this expense; it is too much. The Chandler 
is the first high-grade light-weight six on the market, and the 
demand is very great all over the country. 



Oakland Manager on Motor Trade Outlook 

"The motor trade in California is unlike any other section 
of the United States," says Arthur Bunker, General Manager 
of the Oakland Motor Company. 

"California is wonderfully rich, and during any twelve 
months one can depend upon a certain amount of good trade, 
but the short time I have been here, however, has proved to me 
that it is hard to define the selling season for automobiles. 

"When I first arrived, there was a slackness in trade, and 
considering the advanced season in touring, I felt that it would 
not be until the new models were announced that there would 
be a change for the better in trade conditions. 

"About two weeks ago, suddenly, without any warning, the 
sales of our cars commenced to increase to such an extent that 
I am afraid that we will not have enough cars to fill the de- 
mand. The factory has announced that they have finished up 
the last of the 1913 cars and shipped them to us. This means 
that all we will have to offer to the public is what is en route 
to this city. The factory is turning its attention to the 1914 
product, which we will receive sometime in October." 



Rambler Branch Manager Goes East 

A. J. Kleimeyer, manager of the local branch of the Thomas 
B. Jeffery Company, left Tuesday for the East to attend a 
meeting of Cross Country managers to be held at the factory 
at Kenosha, Wisconsin. Kleimeyer expects to be gone at least 
three weeks, most of which time will be spent at the factory 
Before returning West he will visit his home in Cincinnati. 



Cadillac Announces 1914 Models 

Promising a new element of efficiency, economy and luxury, 
the 1914 Cadillacs will soon demonstrate by their material 
presence what the factory means by its statements. The pres- 
ent Cadillac season for California has just successfully been 
closed with a record of one thousand machines, setting a high 
water mark for automobile selling in this State. 

It has been eleven years since the Cadillac Company put 
out its first practical motor car in large numbers, and the 
growth of their business during the intervening years has 
proven just how trustworthy and practical these cars were. 
Some of them are still in use. 

Five years ago the Cadillac demonstrated to the automobiling 
world that it was possible to place before the public a thor- 
oughly reliable, high-grade, standard automobile to sell for less 
than $2,000. Two years ago the same company was the first 
to equip their cars with the electric lighting and cranking sys- 
tems, which has revolutionized motor car building all over the 
world. At the salesroom of Don Lee, Cadillac distributor for 
California, just what the fourth big step forward the Cadillac 
Company -has made in their 1914 models they were not ready 
to announce, but will let the public know in the second 1914 
announcement. 



Women Drivers Benefited 

Tire troubles have been the bane of women drivers of auto- 
mobiles and especially on electrics, and many otherwise en- 
joyable rides and short tours taken by women owners of elec- 
trics have been spoiled by the fear of having to get out and re- 
pair a puncture on some busy street corner, or alongside of a 
lonely country road. 

"The obstacle to the woman motorist's happiness has been 
removed," said McCoy, of the Chanslor & Lyon Company, 
which has branch houses in all the leading coast cities, "and 
tire troubles, blowouts, punctures, cement patching, extra 
equipment and dozens of tire worries are abolished by the 
Motz cushion tires for electrics. With the disappearance of 
tire troubles the last obstacle to the pleasure of driving an 
electric car has been done away with." 



rniiismsuiiinmisiJiiuumimmisinnmmannsiminiuiSiimriRRjuiimas 





It Made The Automobile Safe. Do 
not accept substitutes. "Raybestos" 
is the standard brake lining of the 
industry. The name is stamped on 
every foot for your protection. 



The Royal Equipment Company 

Bridgeport. Conn. 
CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

Pacific Coast Distributers 



^iI^^iIZniiSZSU2IZJVinnI2IiIiSi^TiJUlJiIUZiUiSinnSiSiSinSZIUiiJUiIini2IUinnSiIi 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing worn out Bearinee with the world re- 
nowned H ESS-BRIG HTS. All sizes carried In stock 




Pacific Coast Distributors 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

San Francisco Fresno LosAngelei Portland Seattle Spokane 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
. County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. . 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



STORE YOUR AUTOMOBILE 

Convenient to All Downtown 
HOTELS - CLUBS - THEATRES 



COLUMBIA GARAGE 



655 GEARY ST., near Jones. 



Phone Franklin 544 



Day and Night Washing and Storage— Supplies— Tires 
Machine Shop— Vulcanizing— Electrics 



BETTS 

CRESCENT GRADE 

AUTOMOBILE SPRINGS 

Guaranteed against break- 
age or settling for 
one year 



Phone 
Kearny 2472 




Manufactured by 

BETTS SPRING CO. 

888-890 Folsom St. 



Stn FriDciic. Cal. 



Copyrleht 1912 BetU Spring- Co. 



f^/^VT) Oil I]> I Fireproof garage and 
■ill |\ /X r\ I . Ii . » machine shop fully 
K V^J-V LJ1 »■■■-'■■-'• equipped. More work 
than can be taken care of. Large list of satisfied cus- 
tomers. A fine paying proposition. Elegantly located 
near San Francisco. Must sell. 



Box 100, News Letter 



21 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
tarsest west of New York, covers 9.000 square feet of 
pace, and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
wo will he very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
etc You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULOING CO., 
Everything in Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin US4. Home C 40S4. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street, 



San Francisco 



Tips to Automobi lists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the_ touring public. Attractive parlors for ladies in connec- 
garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 



"Mission Front" 



SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North hirst street. The best French 
dinner In California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention, 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTG GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— just opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 



MONTEREY COUNTY. 
SOLEDAD.— JOHNSON'S GARAGE. Gas, oils, machine shop, repairing, 
storage. Telephone Main 171. Autos for hire day or night. Agency 
Overland and Kissel cars. 

MONTEREY.— SELBY EROS. GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP-. Agents 
for Stutz and Oakland cars. Autos for hire. Oil, gasoline and sundries. 
First-class repair work and service. Phone Monterey 33. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

SANTA CRUZ.— Stop at JENSEN BROS. AUTO CO.. the newest and 
finest equipped garage and machine shop. One-half block from St. George 
Hotel. One block to right after crossing covered bridge. Phone 637. 

SANTA CRUZ.— When in Santa Cruz stop with the BEACH GARAGE, 
opposite the Casa Del Rey Hotel. Noted for its high-class service. Com- 
plete repair shop, open day and night. Full line of accessories and 
tires. 



SONOMA COUNTY. 
SANTA ROSA.— OCCIDENTAL HOTEL. 'You Auto" stop here. A 

mm n ii mi limited irarietj It ■■'■■■ 6 

SANTA ROSA.— GRAND GARAGE. Third and Main Sts., opp. Court- 
house. First-class repair work. Electric starting system and batteries re- 
charged. Phone 166. Cadillac cars. 



GEYSERVILLE.— PIONEER GARAGE. A. Lampson & Sons, Props. 
Fully equipped blacksmith and machine shop. Studebaker headquarters. 
Tires in stock; supplies and repairs. Tel. Main 251. Main St., GeyservHle. 

PETALUMA-— PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 

& Murpl ; and C Sts; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 

nine work and gear cutting; supplies, repairing', auto livery; 

lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries. 

CLOVERDALE-— WARREN'S GARAGE. Geo. F. Warren. Prop. Fully 
equipped blacksmith and machine shop; Studebaker headquarters; tires In 
stock: supplies and repairs. Upper West St., Cloverdale. Phone Main 221. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT. WALTERS & FRASER, G Shop, Fifth 

and Main sts. Vulcanising, gasoline and lubricants. General machine and 
I ;il work. W. Walters, Y. E. Frazer. Phone Main 84. 

LAKEPORT.— lakkview HOTEL (under new management), on Clear 
Lake. Every convenience for automoblllsts. Garages near by. Rates 
reasonable. F. E. Carpenter, Proprietor. 



San Francisco 



"Pillsbury's Pictures" 

of California's Scenic Beauty Spots. When you return 
from your auto trip have your films finished by experts 
and see the largest collection of Western views at 
219 POWELL STREET 



A FEW BARGAINS 



BAKER ELECTRIC 
FLANDERS ELECTRIC 
WOODS ELECTRIC 
OVERLAND ROADSTER 
7 PASSENGER KNOX 

BOX 101, 



NEW 

NEW 

NEW 

$ 500 

3,500 



NEWS LETTER 

21 SUTTER STREET, S. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



leading j\mericarL (grs 




HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 
San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Models Prices 

24 Runabout $950 

25 Touring Car 1JS0 

30 Roadster 1125 

31 Touring Car ■ 1285 

40 Touring Car 1650 



CASE 



Model 
2-Pass. 
5 -Pass. 
5-Pass. 
7-Pass. 



J. I. CASE T. M. CO., INC. 
San Francisco. 
Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

H. P. Price 

Roadster 30 $1500 

Touring 30 1600 

Touring 40 2200 

Touring 40: 2400 




PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1913 Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model "6," Thlrty-slx. 

Touring Car, 5-pass $2400 $1950 

Touring Car, 7-Pass 2600 2150 

Torpedo, 4-Pass 2400 1950 

Roadster. 2-Pass 2400 1960 

All prices Include full equipment and are f. o. b. 
Detroit. 




PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 
Golden Gate Avenue and Polk St., San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. San Francisco. 
Models — 

40 — 4-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster $1800 

40 — 4-eyl. 5 Pass. Touring 1800 

60— 6-cyl. 2 Pass. Roadster 2600 

60 — 6-cyl. 4 Pass. Demi-Tonneau 2600 

60 — 6-cyl. 5 Pass. Touring 2600 

60— 6-cyl. 7 Pass. Touring 2650 



L 




OSEN-McFARLAND AUTO CO. 
San Francisco and San Jose 

Model — Price 

Empire 31 $1050 

5-Passenger touring car, completely equipped. 




PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
'Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Model — 

Model "T" Touring Car 
Model "T" Runabout .. 
Model "T" Town Car .. 



Price 
..$600 
.. 626 
.. 800 




MOTOR. CARS 



J. W. LEAVITT &. CO. 
301 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Model H. P. Price 

Touring Car 60 $2900 

Roadster 60 2900 

Town Car 60 3900 




HAYNES AUTO SALES CO. 

Turk at Polk St. 
Prices F. O. B. Pacific Coast. 

Model 24— 2, 4 and 6 Pass. (4-cyl.) $1,950 

Model 24— Coupe (4-cyl.) 2,400 

Model 23—2. 4 and 6 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2,700 

Model 23—6 Pass. (6-cyl.) 2.960 

Model 23— Coupe (6-cyl.) 3,200 

Model 23— Limousine (6-cyl.) 3,860 




H. O. HARRISON 
1036 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Standard Models 



Prices F. 
Model "37 37 h. p. 

Touring Car $1875 

Phaeton 1875 

Roadster 1876 

Limousine 3250 

Coupe 2360 



B. Factory. 
Model ■•54■' 54 h. p. 

Touring Car $2450 

Phaeton 2450 

Roadster 2450 

Limousine 3750 

Coupe 2950 




BEKINS-SPEERS MOTOR CO. 
Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 



Type 72 


Prices F. 


O. B. Factory Type 77 


Model — 


Price 


Model — Price 


7-Pass. 


Touring $5000 


6-Pass. Touring $3250 


5-Pass. 


Touring 5000 


2-Pass. Runab't 3250 


4 -Pass. 


Touring 5000 


6-Pass. Limous'n 4450 


4 -Pass. 


Toy Ton. 5000 


5-Pass Limous'n 4450 


2-Pass. 


Runab't 6000 


3-Pass. Coupe 3850 


7-Pass. 


Limous'n 6500 





fttcPUon, 



..j 



MARION MOTOR CAR CO. 

.t55 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

37-A Touring 40 $1476 

IS-A Touring 48 1850 

36-A Roadster 40 1425 

38-A Roadster 40 1476 

All Cars Completely Kqulpped. 



A\AR/AQN 



MORRIS KENNEDY CO., INC., 

545 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

New Series Marmon "Thirty-Two" 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Mod. Thirty-Two 

Chassis $2500 

Five-Pass. Tour- 
ing Car 3000 

Four-Pass. Sub- 
urban 3000 

Roadster 2900 

Speedster 2860 

Limousine 4000 



Landaulet $4100 

Marmon "Six" 
2, 4, 6 and 7-pas- 

senger $5000 

Limousine 6280 

Landaulet 6350 

Berline Limousine 

6450 



Remodeling of Overland Home 

The remodeling and decorating of J. W. Leavitt & Company's 
salesrooms and service station, the home of the Overland cars 
in this city, is progressing rapidly, and soon this firm will again 
be settled in their renovated headquarters, ready to sail into 
the big automobile business with renewed energy. Though 
business has been going on as usual during the alterating and 
remodeling of the salesrooms, stock rooms and service station, 
with the additional facilities. that the new arrangement of space 
gives, the Overland sales force will be able to handle their 
constantly increasing business much more expeditiously than 
before. 

J. W. Leavitt & Company have one of the best locations 
along Automobile Row, and have shown their faith in the future 
of the motor car business by their renewal of the lease of their 
present quarters. 



Kissel-Kar Service to Buyers 

"Service is a question of the very highest importance in de- 
termining automobile or truck values," said H. F. Noakes, of 
the Kissel-Kar. "No matter how high class the car, or how ap- 
parently right its price, it is at least of doubtful value unless 
there is accessible service behind it. Before purchasing a car, 
buyers should find out just what is going to be done to simplify 
its care and keep the cost of its upkeep where it belongs. The 
acceptance of verbal promises is not good business, for, even 
assuming perfectly good faith, misunderstandings must occur. 

"Every buyer of a Kissel-Kar receives a written guarantee 
that is simple and specific, but more important still is the phy- 
sical evidence of ample facilities to carry it out. No evasion or 
hedging is morally possible, and the buyer can see with his 
own eyes just how well the Kissel branches are equipped to 
insure performance." 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



31 




-, — - — ■ ; — '. « 



MICHIGAN MOTOR CAR CO. 

California Branch 

283-291 Golden Gate Ave San Francisco 

Imperial Garage — Oakland 



Model — 

"I," and "O" 

"R" and "S" . 



Standard Models 



..33 h. p 
.40 h. p. 



Price 

$1690 
1875 



Maxwell 






UNITED MOTORS S. F. COMPANY. 

Polk St.; near McAllister San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model 2B. 5-Pass. Touring Car 

Model 35, 5-Pass. Touring Car 31086 

Model 40. 5-Pass. Touring Car 1650 

Model 50, 7-Pass. Touring Car 2360 




MERCER 



IH 



SIMPLEX-MERCER PAC. COAST AGENCY 

1319 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Model H. P. Price 

Type 35, Series O, 4-Pass 32.4 h. p. $3100 

Type 35, Series H. 6-Pass 32.4 h. p. 3100 

Type 35, Series J, Race'b't 30.6 h. p 2850 

Type 36, Series K, Runabout . .30.6 h. p. 2850 




LOUIS J. BORIE, 

Central and Northern Distributor, 
1255 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

Delivered In San Francisco. 

Pries 

Met* "22V4," fully equipped. 22 h. p 1676 

Metz Special. 22ft h. p 496 




fctzbnat 



HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 

523 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Five Models, Improved Series V. 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

Semi-Racing- Roadster $2750 

Speedway Roadster 3150 

Toy Tonneau 3300 

Five-Passenger Touring Car 3300 

Seven-Passenger Touring Car .." 3400 

Also Limousines. Sedans and Coupes. 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 
301 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 











Standard 


Models. 










Model 


H. 


P. 


Price 


Model 


H 


. 


P 


Price 


69 


T 


30 h. 


P 


$1100 


71-T 


45 


h 


p. 


$1625 


69 


•V 


30 h. 


P. 


1126 


71-P 


45 


h 


P- 


1626 


69 


R 


30 h. 


p. 


1100 


71-R 


45 


h 


p. 


1625 


ea 


■0 


30 h. 


P 


1660 


































PATHFINDER MOTOR CAR CO. 

Geary and Polk Sts. San Francisco 

Standard Models 

Prices F. O. 8. Factory. 

Five-Pass, touring 1 car. 40 horsepower $2185 

Four-Pass, phaeton, 40 horsepower 2185 

Two-Pass. Roadster. 40 horsepower 2160 

Three-Pass, coach, 40 horsepower 2500 

Two-Pass, cruiser. 40 horsepower 2000 

Delivery wagon. 40 horsepower 2000 



^.,. — 



(j&rceQn 



rrew 

PIERCE-ARROW SALES CO. 
Geary and Polk Sts. San Francisco 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Model 


H.T 






Price 


3S-C 


38 h. p. 


5-Pass. 


Touring 


$4300 


48-B 


48 h. p 


7 -Pass. 


Touring 


5000 


fifi-A 


66 h. p. 


7 -Pass. 


Touring 


6000 




FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

F, O. B. San Francisco. 

Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Model "T" Underslung Touring Car $1126 

Model "N" Underslung Roadster 1075 

Model "H" Underslung Touring Car 1525 

Regal Underslung Colonial Coupe 1375 

Model "C" Standard Touring Car 1375 




REO-PACIFIC COMPANY 
Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Standard Models. 

Model h. P. Price 

5-Passenger 30-35 h. p $1296 

2-Passenger 30-35 h. p 1295 

1% Ton Truck 30-35 h. p : 1975 




AUTO SALES CO. 

418 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 

"40" 6-Pass. Touring Car $2000 

"40" 4 -Pass. Torpedo 2000 

"4o" Limousine 3000 

M Special 5-Pass. Touring 1000 

"32" Model R 5-Pass. Touring 1500 

"32" Model W 5-Pass. Touring 1350 

"32" Model RX Roadster 1460 



WINTON SIX 



THEWINTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

S. E. Cor. Sutter and Van Ness 
F O. B, Factory 



Roadster $3000 

Toy Tonneau 3000 

roaring 3000 



i< airing 
Limon- 
[AndMlet 

Coupe 



»: rj'o 
1260 



Aftermath of the Big Panama-Pacific Road Race 

In relating how he secured first place in the recent race 
from Los Angeles to Sacramento, Frank Verbeck, who drove 
the Fiat, relates an interesting story. "As we lan into Antelope 
Valley," said Verbeck, "there were several machines ahead 
of us, one of them containing Barney Oldiield. We were run- 
ning some distance behind him, owing to a slight mishap that 
we had met with earlier in the race. Knowing that the country 
around here was all level, and that the roads curved around a 
bit, when we saw Oldfield's rear light disappear around a bend 
we determined to steal a march on him. Cutting across the 
road, we swung into the sagebrush, and after a short run had 
the good luck to come into the road ahead of Barney's car." 
The Fiat that Verbeck and Ham piloted to victory on the 
Fourth is on display at the salesrooms of the Fiat Motor Sales 
Company on Van Ness avenue and Jackson street, where 



Dwight Whiting, manager of the local branch, is proudly show- 
ing her to the admiring public. 

* * * 

Goodyear Tires Win Elgin Races 

Another victory was awarded Goodyear motorcycle tires re- 
cently, when "Fearless Falke" won the National Motorcycle 
Race at Elgin, for the V. Ray trophy. 

Out of five machines finishing first, four of them were 
equipped with Goodyear tires, and as a result S. A. Falor, head 
of the motorcycle department, who had witnessed the races, 
returned to Akron a very happy man. 

For 245 miles at an average speed of 57 miles per hour Falke 
led the other fifty contestants, and during the race his tires re- 
ceived harder usage than would be given them by two years 
wear. This illustrates the toughness and wonderful mileage 
lhat can be taken out of Goodyear tires. 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



lM@w Aitomdbfe IR@™ft[r«itfcn@nn§ 



New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
July 12th. The number of automobile licenses authorized to 
date for the State of California is 110,882. 

GORE, JAMES T. 910 1-2 13th St., Sacramento Overland 

LEAP, HARRY, tare 523 Golden Gate Ave., S. F National 

WADDELL, R. P., 1014 Franklin St., Oakland Reo 

LANE, Z., Morse Hotel, Berkeley Chalmers 

HART, B. E., Quiney Chalmers 

HERMANN, J. J., box 52. Sisson National 

STRUBE, JAMES. Madera Ford 

PARKER, GEO. E., R. P. D. No. 6, Bakersfield Oakland 

HOCHEIMBR & CO.. Bakersneld White 

BREWSTER, ALMON J., Placerville Stanley 

McNEIL. R. T., Lafayette Ford 

AGER, J. A., Ager, Siskiyou County Studebaker 

BRIGGS, W. E., 2209 M St.. Sacramento Maxwell 

WARD, P. B., 810 22d St.. Sacramento Ford 

HUNT, F. C. 3724 Park Ave., Sacramento Ford 

HAYS, H. C. 953 Jones St.. S. F Imperial 

WILSON, CLARK, 545 O'Farrell St., S. F •. Oldsmobile 

MATHEWS, \ E., 151 Sutter St., s. F Buick 

BROWN, A. F.. 915 Postal Blag., S. F Overland 

KLINGER, MRS. T. 1!.. 120 Lyon St.. S. P Detroit 

BARNETT. MISS HELEN, 58 Palm St., S. F Detroit 

WOOD, R. J.. 580 McAllister St., S. F Buick 

NEWELL. D. I... 52(1 Lyon St., S. F Wagenhals 

FUNGE. L. B.. 557 Mark, t St., S. !•' Ford 

ROBINSON, PAUL, Lodge Cafe, S. F American 

STAGG. J. S.. Turlock Ford 

SHELBY', MILES M.. Hughson. Stanislaus County Ford 

DOUGHERTY'. .1.. care 22 F.. Miner St.. Stockton Hercules 

CHAPPELL, MRS. G. E., Grass Valley Ford 

YOUNG, s. .1., Grldley Buick 

WRIGHT, THOS., Hi tie la Overland 

BURTON & ANGDON, R. F. I). No. 2. box 88, Hartford Ford 

BOND, A. W.. Chico Overland 

CURTIS. A. A.. Red Bluff Ford 

BASHER. MADISON, Kelsej ville Ford' 

PAC ENGINEERING & CONS. CO., Eureka : Ford 

DAVIS, GILBERT, Stockton Overland 

McPHEE, A. J., Stockton Kissel 

HETZLER. R: A., Bscalon Overland 

FELTON. HERMAN A.. Stockton Overland 

SAMSON IRON WORKS, Stockton Overland 

BRANSTETTER, H. M.. L nls, Placer County Ford 

LINCOLN HD\Y. CO.. Lincoln Ford 

VAN DYK BROS., Pleasant Grove Studebaker 

CR1PP, F. L.. Auburn Overland 

WHEELER, F. D„ 2353 San Pablo Ave., Oakland Ford 

LESSIG. C. H., 1419 Mound St., Alameda Ford 

McCULLOUGH. A. P.. Red Bluff Ford 

BRAGHETTA. 1. C. 905 N. Main St., Napa Overland 

SHERWOOD. B. G., Sheriff's office. Placerville Galloway 

GELDER, D. V., 146 McAllister St., S. F Ford 

LUNDY, R. E.. 2814 36th St., Sacramento Ford 

LUHRS, .MRS. A. C. Colonial Hotel. S. F Paige 

WESTERN SUGAR REFINING CO., '•" California St., s. F Ford 

YAGER, W. W.. 1129 Hyde St.. S. F Kissel 

PEARCE. MRS. A. H.. 257 Leavenworth si., s. F .'Overland 

GOLDWATER, R. H.. 167 Market St., s. F Overland 

SOMERS, DR. HOWARD, Butler Bldg., S. F Ford 

SALMANSON, 11.. 31S2 Washington St.. S. F Cole 

PILLI, E„ 3576 18th St.. S. F Studebaker 

SEIGER, LILLIE M., 712 Wesley Ave., Oakland Michigan 

RISDON, C. O.. 240 Mather St.. Oakland Iiein.it 

LOWREY, M. I... l.iMiiitore Ford 

YOST, BERT. Fair Oaks Stud' 

FRAY. ALFRED J., R. F. D. No. II. Modesto Ford 

POMEROY, C. F.. Healdsburg Ford 

TARK HILL FLORAL I • >.. Heme! stud 

SCOTT. CHAS. E., 270 S. 1st St., San Jose American 

THAYER, MRS RUFUS C, Lawrence Studebakei 

Schwartz, g.. Lemoore Ford 

PARSONS. J. I., box 654. Santa Rosa Cadillac 

HUTCHINSON. J. A.. Crescent City Ford 

HAM, L. R., 2226 Thomas St., Fresno Regal 

UNDER, j. U., Gllroy Ford 

FRESNO bakery, 1402 i St., Fresno Studebaker 

SIMPSON, II. R.. Fresno Studebaker 

HESSE, F. L.. Fresno Studebaker 

BUTLER, B. R.. 616 N. Douty St.. Hanlord Regal 

BERRINGER, J. 1... St. Helena Cadillac 

DAVIS & RAYBURN, Placerville Gramm 

ZELINSKY, H. K, 564 Eddy St., S. F Regal 

PRY'OR, GEORGE H.. Presidio, San Francisco Touring 

BRUNING, J. J.. 5856 Locksley Ave.. Oakland Haynes 

SOMXER, R. O.. 932 H SI.. Fresno Lewis 

LEE. FRED. Pentz, Oroville Buick 

REESE, A. B., R. F. D. No. 8, box 54. Visalia Regal 

SHAW, H. W., 106 Forsythe Bldg., Fresno Regal 

TUITE, THOS., Palace Market, Redwood City Studebaker 



JACKSON, T., Golf and Country Club. San Rafael Ford 

PENRYN FRUIT CO.. Penryn Stanley 

MARCUS, C. L.. Columbia Hotel. S. F Ford 

MORGAN, D. N.. Nevada City ii 

HUDSON, R. N.. R. F. I '. No. '1, Lindsay Ford 

BLACK. A. R.. Lindsay Ford 

STONE. O. W., 233 X. Vine Ave., Ontario Ford 

SUTTON, C. E., Oleander Ford 

BROW. C. C, Durham, Butte County Cart rat 

LY'TLE, H. J., 727 9th St.. Sacramento Ford 

GOLliSTEIN, S. L., 120 Market St., S. F Oakland 

UNION OIL CO., Mills Bldg.. S. F Kelly 

BOYD. GUY' c. 1846 Pint St.. s. F Cadillac 

OEHM, F. A.. 524 Guerrero St.. S. F McFarlan 

JAS. CAHILL CO.. .".72 12th St.. Oakland Overland 

CONNOR, S. B., 2009 Central Ave., Alameda Peel IE 

McDERMOTT. A. !'.. Faiclnes Buick 

HUTCHINSON, L. M., Coalinga studebaker 

KAKA1IADIAN. K.. 1 In:' 1 St.. Fi esno Studebaker 

FRITZ. G. L.. Corralitos ■ Overland 

BLACKBURN. FRANK D., Ml 3d St.. WatsonviUe Overland 

UARI l AM, ED., Butte City Rambler 

WAUL, HERMAN, 1021 E St.. Eureka Cole 

DAVENHILL. W., 47 Garfield Ave., Santa Cruz Studebaker 

JESSEN, CONRAD. Gilroy Empire 

FITZSIMMONS. CATHERINE E, Loleta Ford 

ERICKSEN, ERICK. Ferndale Ford 

WALSH, DR. K. F„ 911 F st. Eureka Ford 

PRESTON, "W. A.. Areata Ford 

CHAPMAN. I... Napa Federal 

STEIERT, A. R.. 4:13 Emerson St. Palo Alto Buick 

lyux, w. c, Emerson St., Palo Alto ti rial 

BELL. T. K.. Holtville Studebaker 

ELLIS, M. C Sunnyvale Ford 

LEWIS, E. G., Atascadero Ranch, Tompleton Ford 

SMITH, A. C. Melones Overland 

HESS, MRS. BERTHA, box 7. McKittrlek Ford 

COBB. WILLIAM, Eden Vale Overland 

lassere. romai.x. 727 s. Uth si., s.m Jose Overland 

THOMAS, M. S., Hanlord Ford 

HOWE. E. H., Sanford Ford 

MARTELLA, JAMES. Hanford Ford 

WILSON, W. J., Hanlord Ford 

ZUGG, B. E.. Hanford Ford 

SILVER &. PEREIRA CO., llaywa.tds 

LAMBERT. MRS. W. D., II Sumner St., S. F Metz 

CAITO, A., 755 Lombard St.. S. F Studebakei 

HALL, S. W., care Hanford Garage, Hanford Stud 

BREEDEN. DR., Fresno Reo 

BBSAN BROS.. Reedley Overland 

HAMLIN, J., Delano '. On 

CLIFFORD FARM CO.. Exeter Studebaker 

GRIGSBY & LINDAUS. Alturas Studebaker 

TRAVIS, WM., Sacramento Studebaker 

KING. J. E., Sacramento Studebaker 

BRENDAL, J. P.. 302) I 1 St., Sacramento Overland 

ROSE. FRANK. Free-port Chalmers 

BROCK. FRANK. Wheatland Chalmers 

RANKIN, JOHN. 229 1-2 I St., s, F '. Stevens 

FERNHOFF, FRED i: LOS Montlcello Avi .. Piedmont American 

GALLIGAN. H. P.. Chico 

HARWOOD. R., Lebes, Kern County Overland 

MONTGOMERY, box 71. Taft Ford 

UPI'YKE. J. L.. Wasco F <> rd 

ADAMS, I. B.. De Sabla, Butte County Ford 

HOBART, WALTER, Pacific-Union Club. s. F Mercedes 

THOMPSON, W. A.. Meridian Ford 

Y. M. C. A., Ventura Ford 

1TNKERTON. JOHN. Ventura Ford 

MORGAN. M. E„ Upland Baby Reo 

KING, JR.. F. J.. Hotel Arcade. Oakland Ford 

PAC. CRUDE OIL CO.. 110 .Market St., S. F tones 

WITTNER, JOHN J.. 171 2d St.. s. F Oakland 

BECKNAGLE, MRS. KITTIE, 2711! Lexington Ave., S. F Ford 

MEEK. T. EL, 1157 Mission St., s. F Hud on 

JORDAN, C. L„ 2611 Filbert St., S. F 

PARAFFINE PAINT CO.. 31 First St.. s. F Union 

JOOST BROS.. 1274 Mu.kei St., S. F Federal 

JUDSON. C. W.. 1319 Van Ness Ave., s. F Mercer 

BAILEY! t. EDWARD, 310 12th Ave., S. F Ford 

LINCOLN SIGHTSEEING CO., 156 McAllister St., S. F liael 

WCODFIELD, W. II aission St.. S. F M B 

ARNSTEIN, LAURBXCi;. ::,l and Mission Sts.. S. F Firestone 

NEWMAN', A. B.. 865 Aileeri St., Oakland Ford 

TOMJJNSON, T. L.. 454 .ban St.. Oakland Abbott 

ENSIGN, B. G., 1762 Broadway. Oakland H 

MILLER. A. J.. San Leandro Commerce 

FREEMAN. AX I 'HEW. Tompleton 

l.UNTGSROVER. HARRY. Tulare Fo ' d 

MONCRIEF. R. 10.. Reediey Overland 

COSTA, REV. ABEL A.. R. F. D. NO. 1. box 111. Merced 

YORK, M. C. Highland i," -^a'' 

MINTURN, James W., Sharon Franklin 

WRAY. F. P.. Davis Empire 

WIENSE. P. .1. R Hey Oakland 

CUNNINGHAM, ROBERT, Sebasl 1 studebakei 

STANDARD OIL CO.. Taft ....Ford 



July 19, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



33 




HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles South from San Francisco. Finest all 
grass Golf Course in California. Daily rates $5, $6, 
$7 per day. Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL MONTE, under same 
management. Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 

Special monthly rates. 

CASTLE CRAGS 

In the yellow pine forests of the Sacramento River. 
Rates $18 to $24 per week. Western Union, Wells- 
Fargo and Southern Pacific offices. Good fishing; 
riding horses; automobiles. For further information 
and folders address 

MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS, CAL. 

Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 



Anderson Springs 

4 Miles from Middletown. On the most beautiful fishing stream 
In California. 

NOW OPEN. 

Hot steam baths. Cold sulphur and sour springs. $10 per week. 
Children half price. 

Good automobile road. Special attention to lutomobllists. 

Address: MISS ROSE ANDERSON, Andenon Springs Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

P. S. — Received gold medal for best springs in Lake County. 



Brookdale Hotel 

In the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains, only 2% hours from 
S. F. White sulphur water springs on hotel grounds. No wind; 
no fog. Climate ideal. TROUT FISHING, the best In 10 yeans. For 
Information and booklet, write MRS. M. FAIRLBE, Prop.. Brook- 
dale, or Peck-Judah's. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT. NATURAL HOT 
SULPHUR WATER. 
Swimming tank. 50 bath tubs. Hotel strictly modern; excellent 
service: rates reasonable; no staging. Send for Information and 
booklet to THBOPOR RICHARDS, proprietor. Agua Callente. 
Sonoma County. Cal.. or Peck-Judah. 687 Market St.. San Fran- 
cisco. Good auto roads direct to the springs. 



FETTERS HOT SPRINGS 

California's Ideal Health and Pleasure Resort. 

Onlv two hours' ride from San FmndsCO and Hay Cities on the 

N W P or S F. R. R. Concrete Swimming Tank; Tub. Plunge 

and Electric Light Paths. Expert Masseur*. Path House 60 feet 

from Hotel and Cottages. Rates reasonable. Fine table supplied 

■ dairy ami farm. Electric lights: hot and cold mineral 

water In every room. Buv ticket to Fetter Springs Station. For 

and other Information address GEORGE FETTERS. Fet- 

>irua Caliente. Sonoma Courrty Cal. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

3 Miles from Middletown. 
:EST LAKE COUNTY RESORT TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
A delightful run over good roads through a beautiful country. 
Automobile supplies kept; facilities for ordinary repairs; wash 
rack. 

Hot and Cold Tub Raths. Showers. Natural Hot Mineral Water. 
Plunge, Swimming Tank. Etc. 

EXCELLENT TABLE. 



SANTA CRUZ 



A Place to Rent. 



BOATING BATHING 
GOLFING 



A Place to enjoy yourself. 

FISHING SWIMMING 
TENNIS 



Casa del Rey 

American Plan $5 and $6, European 
Plan if desired. Cottage City European Plan 
$1 per day up. 



For Reservations Address 



E. S. deWOLFE, Manager 



HIGHLAND SPRINGS 

Lake County, Cal. 

The home of the automobile and tourists. Queen of 
all American watering places. Weather and roads un- 
surpassed; most accessible of all Lake County resorts, 
only 14 miles from Pieta, N. W. P. R. R., l l / 2 hours auto 
stage ride, and only 5% hours from San Francisco. Won- 
derful natural hot mineral baths; finest swimming pool 
in the State, supplied with natural mineral water, con- 
stant flow day and night; waters are very beneficial in 
stomach troubles, rheumatism, liver and kidney com- 
plaints; expert masseur; finest table in the county; per- 
fect analysis of all waters. Get booklet. Finest improved 
springs in Lake County; all electric lighted. All kinds 
of amusements, and weekly excursions on Great Clear 
Lake. Dancing, bowling, tennis, croquet and games 
every day and night. Further information, get booklet: 
Peck-Judah, 687 Market St., or write direct: Highland 
Springs P. 0., Lake County, Cal. 

OLAF NELSON, PROP. 

Thos. F. Chatfield, Manager 



TALLAC, Lake Tahoe 

Most scenic resort on Tahoe; 14 small lakes nearby; 
fine livery; automobile road now open via Placerville; 
State road; much the shortest and best route; auto stage 
now running between Tallac and Placerville; June fishing 
always best. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK. Tallac. Cal. 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

EOSON BROS.. Props. 

A resort for pleasure and health, also Ideal for hunting and fishing. 

Is situated In Siskiyou County. Cal. on highway to KlamaUi Fairs 

and Crater Lake. Good roads, garage, gasoline. Particulars write 

W. C BROWN. Manager. Beswlck. Cal. 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



REMEMBER! ! ! 

WE WRITE 
Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automo- 
bile, Plate Glass, Burglary, Elevator, and Health 
and Accident Insurance. 

PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 



San Francisco. Cal. 



C. H. CRAWFORD. President 



1863 



1913 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $8,650,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Samome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well-managed institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Ita policy forma are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Killings Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Dtnsmore J. C. Meussdorffer James W. Dean 



GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 



312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Douglas 2283 
Home Phone C 2899 



The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1850. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total Assets " 7,736,110 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,266,021 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building - San Franctav.o 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 

Assets. Over a Million 



Capital, $100,000 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best in the West) 

Employers' Liability. General Liability. Teams, Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels, Automobile. Burglary. Plate Glass 1 , Accident and Health 

Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers— Edmund P. Green, President: Marshal A. Frank. Vice-Presi- 

dent; Carl G. Brown. Secretary; F. P. Deering, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, 

General Manager Accident and Health Department. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 




Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PEASE. President 589. S91. 593 Market St. 



The belt sod 

atrongest 
Garden Hole 

Guaranteed to 

■tand 700 Ibi 

P ream re 

TRY IT AND 
BE CONVINCED 

Sao Francieco 



OPPOSITE MISSION STREET 
ENTRANCE TO EMPORIUM 

P. E. O'HAIR & CO. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

SOLD DIRECT TO YOU 

857 MISSION ST. Phone Sutter 1813 




JINSVKANCB 




More 1915 
Endorsements. 



W. L. Hathaway, commissioner for 
the World's Insurance Congress to 
be held at San Francisco in 1915, 
advises that three more local asso- 
ciations have adopted resolutions favoring San Francisco as 
the convention place of the National Association of Life Un- 
derwriters for 1915. The proposition to hold the National meet- 
ing of that year at San Francisco was endorsed by the Life 
Underwriters' Association of Los Angeles, and by the Topeka, 
Kas., and Kansas City, Mo., local associations. The first offi- 
cial endorsement given the movement was by the Oregon as- 
sociation, and in addition to those given above, the Nebraska 
association has also adopted resolutions approving San Fran- 
cisco as the 1915 convention place. 

* * * 



The report of the Washington State 
Rejecting Claims. Industrial Insurance Commission, 

which was recently published, pre- 
sents a rather peculiar state of affairs which is giving rise to 
no little comment on the part of insurance men. According 
to the report, the commission has thrown out at least twenty- 
five per cent of the requests for compensation under the State 
law. 

The one conclusion which all who are interested in the matter 
have come to is that Washington is experiencing the same diffi- 
culties which have been experienced by Germany as a result of 
a large number of fraudulent claims under State insurance. This 
feature is pointed out by opponents of the California Work- 
men's Compensation law as the strongest argument against its 
acceptance by the people of this State. The News Letter has 
from time to time drawn attention to like difficulties which .are 
being experienced in England and has advised the people to 
support the referendum which the employers of this state are 
endeavoring to use in the defeat of the measure. 

The members of the Washington state insurance commission 
have been forced to admit that their law is faulty in that there 
has been a steady increase, month by month, in the number of 
accidents reported. The law instead of necessitating the in- 
crease of accident prevention, is working the ether way, mainly 
because the factory with up-to-date safety appliances is taxed 
the same as the one with practically no preventatives of ac- 
cidents. 

* * * 

The Washington Supreme Court has again been called upon 
to pass on the constitutionality of the State insurance act. Argu- 
ments in the case were heard by the court in the suit to collect 
a $1,000 assessment levied against the Mountain Timber Com- 
pany. The court has already passed on the law, but the at- 
torneys for the timber company argued that the points as to 
the constitutionality were not properly raised in that case, and 
the decision of the court not binding. In the oral arguments the 
attorneys contended that the law was unconstitutional because 
it took away from both workmen and the employers the right 
of trial by jury; because it was class legislation, and because 
it tended to destroy the republican form of government. As- 



OLD FORESTER 

Don't Simply Ask for Whisky— Ask for 
OLD FORESTER 

It is Straight Old Whisky, direct from Distillery in 
Kentucky, to You. Take a bottle home and treat 
your friends right. 

For Sale By All Dealers 

KENTUCKY MERCANTILE CO. 

488 Sutter St, San Francisco Phone Sutter 4081 



July 19, 1913. 



and . California Advertiser 



35 



sistant Attorney-General Kelleran, arguing for the State, held 
that it was within the police powers of the State to enact and 
enforce the law. 

• • c 

The department of Commerce and Labor has ordered an in- 
vestigation of railroad accidents resulting from broken car 
wheels and axles. The secretary decided to make the in- 
vestigation as the result of the data gathered by the Interstate 
Commerce Commission, which showed that during the eleven 
years, 1902 to 1912, inclusive, about four times as many wrecks 
were caused by broken car wheels as by broken rails and that 
wrecks from broken axles were half again as numerous as 

those from broken rails. 

* * * 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Fire Protection 
At Exposition. 



Mr. F. H. Porter, manager of the 
Fire Underwriters' Inspection 
Bureau, has issued a comprehensive 
report of the proposed fire protec- 
tion equipment for the Exposition. Mr. Porter explains that: 
"During the early stages of Exposition activities, a committee 
consisting of representatives of the National Board of Fire Un- 
derwriters, The Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific, and 
The Fire Underwriters' Inspection Bureau held several con- 
ferences with Mr. H. D. H. Connick, Director of Works of the 
Exposition Company. This resulted in the laying out of a fire 
protection system and the elimination of structural hazards in 
a more efficient manner than could have been accomplished at 
any later date. It also resulted in Mr. W. M. Johnson, one of 
the engineers of the National Board of Fire Underwriters, be- 
ing given a leave of absence and appointed Chief Engineer of 
the Department of Water Supplies and Fire Protection for the 
Exposition, to carry out in detail, the work the committee had 

done in a general way. 

* * * 

Warren M. Horner, of Minneapolis, general agent for the 
Provident Life & Trust, and chairman of the committee on 
education and conservation of the National Association of Life 
Underwriters, has declined to aliow his name to be considered 
as a successor to Neil D. Sills as president of the National 
association. He states that he has not the time to hold that 
office, and also continue as head of the committee on education, 
and prefers to give his attention to the latter work. 



The Smart Set humorist says that prohibition is the 

theory that the best way to combat a vice is to make it more 
vicious. Not only are the statistics showing the increase in 
consumption of liquor in spite of the decrease of saloons strong 
proof that there is something radically wrong with the prohibi- 
tion idea, but the fact that the very moment you tell a man he 
must not, he will do all he can to disobey you, is seemingly 
strong evidence in favor of the contention of Smart Set. 



F. H. C, who is a humorist, says that Mr. Hearst's edi- 
tors are the only people who still see danger of war with 
Japan. He forgets that it is knowledge of that fat pay en- 
velope awaiting them that breeds most of the stuff. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, Santa Rosa. :.i mllei from San Francisco. 
I rviei 



Dr. Byron Halnea, Dentist, has resumed practice at his offices in Gunat 
Building, S. W, corner Qeaxy end I ■ 



The SAN FRANCISCO NKWS l.KTTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed ami published every Saturday hy the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott. ?1 Sutter Street, San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny J594. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal.. Post-office as second-class mall matter. 

Now Yuik I ri Information may be obtained regarding sub- 

scriptions and advertising* — S. L. Carman, representative. 166 Fifth Ave 

Chicago Office — .Tno, A. Tenney, 462 Peoples Gas Building. Chicago. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr. fC5 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England. 

Matter Intended for publication In the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO N1CWS LETTER ANP CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 
be sent to the office 6 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage!— 1 year. 14.00; « months. I1.U. 
Foreign — 1 year SI 00: I months. S3.K. 



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Principal 



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REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



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36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 19, 1913. 



Low Rates East 

Via 

Southern Pacific 

Good on Limited Trains, also on Fast 
Express Trains with Tourist Sleeping Cars. 

Excellent Dining Car Service on All 
Trains. 

Stopovers Both Going and Returning. 

ROUND TRIP 



Baltimore 


$107.50 


Boston 


110.50 


Chicago 


72.50 


Colorado Springs 


55.00 


Dallas, Tex. 


62.50 


Denver 


55.00 


Duluth 


83.30 


Houston 


62.50 


Kansas City 


60.00 


Memphis 


70.00 


Minneapolis 


75.70 


Montreal 


108.50 


New Orleans 


70.00 


New York 


108.50 


Philadelphia 


108.50 


Quebec 


116.50 


St. Louis 


70.00 


St. Paul 


75.70 


Toronto 


95.70 


Washington 


107.50 


and other 


points 



Sale Dates — 

July 22, 23, 24, 30, 31. 

August 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28. 

September 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11. 

Final return limit three months from date of sale, but not 
later than October 31, 1913. 



Southern Pacific 



SAN FRANCISCO : Flood Building, Palace Hotel, Ferry 
Station. Phone Kearny 3160. Third and Townsend 
Street Station. Phone Kearny 180. 

OAKLAND: Thirteenth street and Broadway. Phone 
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1420. First-St. Station, Phone Chhland 7960. 



HOTEL AND SUMMER RESORTS 



WITTER SPRINGS 

Lake County's Finest Hotel 

NOW OPEN 



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VACATION 1913 

A Handbook of 

SUMMER RESORTS 

Along the Line of the 

Northwestern Pacific 
Railroad 

This book tells by picture and word of the many 
delightful places in Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake 
and Humboldt counties in wnich to spend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Resorts, Camping Sites, Farms and 
Town Homes. 

Copies of "Vacation 1913" may be obtained at City 
Ticket Offices of Southern Pacific and Santa Fe com- 
panies; also at 874 Market Street (Flood Building), 
Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or on application to 



J. J. GEARY, G. F. and P. A. 



808 Phelan Building 



San Francisco 



Ocean Shore Railroad 

"Reaches the Beaches" 



NEW SERVICE 



See Newspaper* For 



Schedule 

YOUR SUNDAY TRIP - 



DEPOT 12TH AND MISSION STS. I. N. RANDALL. Geucr J Ajenl 




BtUU lilted July <0, l*M 




(Bnlxi amok Mftitrtxztt* 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 26, 1913 



No. *4 



Wars may rage and blood may flow, but The Hague 

basks on forever.- 

How time does change the old order. Once it was mort- 
gages that kept the farmer worried — now it is his automobile. 

What a lot of letter writing United States Senators and 

Representatives will save now that embossed stationery is 
abolished. 

Meantime the manufacturers should worry because the 

consumption grows every time a saloon shuts down, according 
to statistics. 

Possibly the reason they are making laws for earlier 

closing of saloons in certain American cities is to give more 
time to sobering up. 

Secretary Bryan's grape juice and "Teddy's" milk- 
shake have certainly had a disastrous effect on Washington's 
Sunday entertainment. 

Of course the king can do no wrong. Robert Bridges 

has been appointed the English poet laureate, and it is not for 
us to comment thereon. 

No, sir, woman can't keep a secret notwithstanding all 

this talk of her modern awakening. Instance — the plot to burn 
London was discovered. 

Even though those Mexicans cannot decide upon a favor- 
ite son for president, they can at least give the world a whole 
iot of worry and anxiety. 

Mexico's Minister of the Interior savs that peace may 

be considered an accomplished fact. Just what does the word 
"peace" mean, in Mexican? 

The reclaimed Niagara demonstrates that the ship does 

not always make the man, and we think all the more of Com- 
modore Perry because of it. 

If some well intentioned newspapers keep on trying to 

separate McReynolds and Bryan from the Cabinet, we will wit- 
ness some fun in Washington yet. 

Congressmen have apparently become tired of having 

magazine writers get all the glory for muck-raking which has 
become a popular American pastime. 

If Willie Hearst can't have war with Japan, he can at 

least do a lot toward stirring up quite a little semblance of one 
with Mexico — if he keeps on — perhaps. 

Financial reports say that more gold is going to Paris. 

Either Frenchmen are terribly greedy or they are not the 
money savers we have been led to believe. 

The preference the hydroaeroplane seems to have for 

the water makes it appear that, for convenience sake at least, 
the name ought to be shortened until the thing shows some 
aero symptoms. 



David Lamar seems fairly well satisfied with himself, 

which does not say much for the old proverb that the punish- 
ment for evil consists in being what you are. 

Strange what a wonderful awakening has come to people 

who have "sunken" since the Bulletin started its school of 
writing among the denizens of the underworld. 

In spite of the compelling of the "end-seater" to move 

along, as is the vogue in some Eastern cities, the rule doesn't 
seem to affect the fellow who takes his place. 

Where will the thirsty Washingtonians go on Sunday ? 

Hurry up and answer because there is a limit to some things, 
and the politician's thirst is considered one of them. 

An elastic currency is perfectly acceptable to us, bank- 
ers notwithstanding. But we would suggest placing a per- 
fectly unmistakable emphasis on the second syllable. 

Another financier and clubman of San Francisco gone 

wrong. Really, belonging to club life in this town seems to 
be something we would just as soon be relieved from. 

Ambassador Page earns money on the side from his 

magazine. So why condemn Bryan for wanting to make a little 
more than his salary, so that he may live in proper style. 

Illinois troops had a sham battle the other day which 

ended in a draw. The European method of declaring results 
does not seem to have found its way over on this side yet. 

No wonder President Wilson wants the White House 

bathtub changed. What was just right for President Taft be- 
comes rather too much of a swimming pool for his successor. 

Japan's tax rate is mighty high despite the fact that she 

is extremely poor, and still some people urge us to copy them 
just because some one wants to sell a lot of steel and some one 
else wants the job of building Dreadnaughts. 

We are told that the tariff bills will become law on or 

about September 1st, which information does not seem to give 
promise of a vacation for our hard-working Congressmen and 
Senators. 

Brazil's premier was amazed at the grandeur of Ari- 
zona's Grand Canyon. And still our own people keep going 
abroad to see things before stocking up on amazement in their 
own country. 

As long as people are willing to pay so much per, who 

should worry because Mr. Bryan draws down $250 for one 
little lecture, and incidentally augments that measly little 
Cabinet salary? 

A French aviator recently made Ill's miles an hour. 

What we would like to see is some one who can make 25 miles 
with absolute security that no accident can overtake the air- 
ship. Safety, not speed, is most important before some of us 
will forsake the old-fashioned means of locomotion. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 




E/DITORIAL. COMMENT 




Don't Be Misled, 
Mr. Taxpayer. 



The proponents of the bond issue 
for $3,437,000 to be spent in the 
extension of municipal street rail- 
ways are endeavoring to convince 
the people that they will not endanger their credit, jeopardize 
the possible sale of bonds and securities already begging on the 
market, or increase their tax burdens by one dollar. 

Don't be misled, Mr. Taxpayer! The issue is as plain as 
ordinary English can make it. Mr. Mayor and his friends aie 
determined that they shall play at politics when they are sup- 
posed to be doing their level best to protect and foster the in- 
terests of the city and every taxpayer in it. 

Don't be misled, Mr. Taxpayer! William Randolph Hearst 
is endeavoring to make you vote for the bonds by representing 
that the United Railroads is interested in accomplishing their 
defeat. 

Once and for all, Mr. Taxpayer, put from your mind any 
question as to whether or not the United Railroads are inter- 
ested in seeing you vote for or against the bonds. It has abso- 
lutely nothing to do with the big question at issue. What you 
want is economy in the administration of the business in which 
you are a stockholder — and the issuance of these bonds do not 
mean economy, but extravagance. And the price of the ex- 
travagance will not be borne out of the pocket of Hearst, Mayor 
Rolph or the Supervisors. // must come out of your pocket. 
And you cannot affo'd the price. 

Mr. Taxpayer, you have been told by reputable people who 
have presented absolute facts to support their statements, that 
the market for municipal bonds has reached the limit of ab- 
sorption. And remember this, unsalable bonds cannot but shat- 
ter the municipal credit — your credit. 

Don't be misled, Mr. Taxpayer. Don't take our word, and 
for your own sake, don't take the word of the San Francisco 
Examiner. Satisfy yourself by putting two and two together 
for yourself. 

Consider the fact that the City Engineer and the Board of 
Directors of the Exposition have declared that the proposed 
construction will not and cannot relieve the situation as far as 
the transportation for 1915 is concerned, and that it will block 
all streets available for Exposition traffic. 

Consider the fact that nearly $7,000,000 of our bonds are now 
unsold and begging for buyers, with no prospect of success. 

Consider the fact that the advocates of municipal ownership 
who now promise so much, long ago promised you that they 
would finish the County Jail, the County Hospital and the 
City Hall. And consider that they have not kept their word be- 
cause they have been unable to obtain buyers for the bonds 
they issued to accomplish that work. 

Mr. Taxpayer, have you any assurance that they will be 
able to keep their word in regard to the promises regarding 
turther street-railway construction any better than they have 
with reference to the jail, hospital and City Hall. 

Mr. Taxpayer, would it not be better to finish what we have 
already undertaken before we rush further into debt for the 
sake of gratifying Mr. William Hearst and the gang of poli- 
ticians at the City Hall? 

Think it over, Mr. Taxpayer. Think twice before you agree 
to foolishly increase your present tax burden and altogether 
ruin your credit. 



Although the election for Governor 
Will Johnson is a year distant, there is much 

Run Again. speculation as to the personnel of 

the candidates for that office. The 
recent tempest which was stirred up as a result of the sudden 
resignation of District Attorney McNab has given rise to the 
rumor that the former prosecutor intends to make a strong 
bid for the Republican nomination, and there are those who 
assert that he is likely to get it. 

The names of the prospective candidates for the Demo- 
cratic nomination have been recently augmented by the boom 
launched in favor of Fred Hall, and there seems reason to 
believe that the new possibility is likely to prove a favorite. 

And now comes a query from the Sacramento Union: "Will 
Johnson run again?" 

The News Letter is inclined to agree with a portion of a 
Fresno Republican editorial which says that California "never 
had such a Governor nor such an administration," and for that 
reason would say that Hiram Johnson will not run again. Not 
if he is the wise and shrewd politician he would have his ad- 
mirers believe. 

There are those who affirm that the one sure and certain 
means of defeating the Progressive party in this State is to 
have the name of Hiram Johnson on the ballot for re-election. 
Therefore, it is likely that some mean political enthusiasts 
would welcome the affirmative answer to the Union's question. 

Of course, the query is inspired by the fact that Editor 
Rowell is one of the foremost to advise the present Governor 
to announce his intention — whether he aspires to the office of 
United States Senator or return to Sacramento. And as Editor 
Rowell is said to have his eye on one of the two positions, his 
eagerness is readily explained. 

Politics is a strange game, and only those who play it know 
just what their personal intentions really are. But if the ap- 
parent dissatisfaction which is being expressed with a large 
number of the enactments of the 1913 legislature have made 
their impression upon the present incumbent in office, there 
does not- appear to be any necessity for hesitation in answering 
the question as to his running with a decided negative. 

VST 
Apparently Japan is satisfied to 
Japan Resigned. leave matters to readjust them- 

selves with regard to the difficulties 
which have been the subject of so much newspaper discussion 
and more or less foolish talk from men on both sides of the 
Pacific. 

The Japanese Magazine, a publication close to the throne, 
declares that "The question now is whether America is going 
to treat her Japanese visitors as guests or trespassers; will 
she permit them to be regarded with aversion and suspicion, or 
will she insist upon their receiving equal treatment with all 
other foreigners in the United States? In other words, will 
the time soon come when a Japanese will be welcomed to 
American citizenship on the same terms as a European ? Japan 
cannot expect less than this; but she will never demand it." 

This attitude on the part of the Mikado's government would 
tend to discountenance the impression which certain news- 
papers and men of more or less prominence would convey to 
the American people. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



Why should not Secretary Bryan 
Mr. Bryan's Salary. continue to deliver lectures through- 
out the country if he so desires? 
And why should he not do so, in the light of his own explanation 
of the fact that his salary is such as to necessitate it? 

If the critics of Mr. Bryan will but stop to think, they will 
remember that Secretary Hay, during his tenure of office, de- 
voted a great deal of his time to the writing of a book. Great 
Britain never raised any objection to its Ambassador, Mr. 
Bryce, devoting a goodly share of his time to literary pursuits. 
And in the language of the Christian Science Monitor, few 
"nations are more punctilious than England with regard to 
proprieties in diplomatic positions." 

Instead of poking fun at the Secretary of State, and attempt- 
ing to charge him with gross neglect of his official duties, we 
believe that those who are loudest in their censure should be 
praising the man for his frankness. It requires more than or- 
dinary "backbone" to calmly state the truth, and in this in- 
stance, Mr. Bryan did so in a manner which should win ap- 
proval from the most bitter and narrow opponents. 

The Sacramento Union qualifies the censure as bosh. "It is 
no secret," says the Union, "that the Secretary of State's 
salary of $12,000 a year will not support him in the style which 
even so unpretentious a citizen as our Nebraskan must maintain, 
and it is no secret that Mr. Bryan is far from a wealthy man. 
Under these circumstances, may he add to his income by any 
honorable and dignified means, or should he run in debt in or- 
der to have the proud privilege of serving the American peo- 
ple? We should be ashamed of ourselves if we ask the latter, 
and the implication involved in this partisan outcry is hardly 
less humiliating." 

According to the Stockton Mail, whose opinions are generally 
considered to be delivered without bias and with a view to ren- 
dering every one just due, the salary of the Secretary of State 
is "a mere bagatelle in his economical expense account," and 
the fact that our high officials are underpaid is a rebuke to the 
American people. 

As to Mr. Bryan neglecting important duties of State, we are 
inclined to indorse the Christian Science Monitor when it says: 

"It ought to be considered that mutual understandings must 
have been reached by Mr. Wilson and Mr. Bryan before the lat- 
ter was offered or accepted a place in the Cabinet. Having ac- 
cepted such a place, it ought to be considered likewise that it 
was, and is, the Secretary's desire to conform to the wishes of 
his chief. Critics who are disposed to point to neglected diplo- 
matic business, to embarrassment caused by the frequent ab- 
sence of Mr. Bryan from the State Department, etc., would do 
well to remember, perhaps, that the condition of the business 
of that department is in all probability better understood by the 
President and the Secretary than it could possibly be by any 
outsider, no matter how zealous for its welfare." 

In maintaining that Mr. Bryan is perfectly justified in adopt- 
ing his present course in order to augment his insufficient sal- 
ary, we are but doing so with undeniable precedent to support 
the contention. The criticism of those who are his political 
opponents and of such two-faced pretenders as the Hearst pub- 
lications, is something worse than small. 

It is unlikely that Mr. Bryan will suffer any loss of the re- 
spect which a great majority of the American people now have 
for his frankness and for his ability as a leader of men. And it 
is unlikely that those who have attempted to ridicule and dis- 
parage him will gain anything in the favor of the people to 
whom their real motive is only too apparent. 

The News Letter asserts its admiration for Mr. Bryan, and 
without any hesitation ventures the opinion that the general 
verdict wjll be, "Go ahead, Mr. Secretary." 



The action of Mayor Cotterill, of 
Seattle Riots. Seattle, in attempting to deny the 

freedom of the press, has aroused 
no little excitement and indignation in the Puget Sound me- 
tropolis, and has possibly resulted in the editor of the news- 
paper attacked gaining widespread sympathy. 

Such occurrences as those which led to the action of the 
Mayor are of course regrettable, yet it is strange that the ac- 
tions of those who apparently hold the Stars and Stripes in 
brazen disrespect, should be practically encouraged by the 
weak-kneed policy of the man who is supposed, as chief magis- 
trate of the city, to see that the flag, and what it stands for, 
receive proper consideration at the hands of all citizens. 

Colonel Blethen, editor-in-chief and owner of the Seattle 
Evening Times, one of the leading dailies on the Coast, is well 
known as a staunch and patriotic citizen. His patriotism is no 
less well known than is his straightforward and at times bit- 
ter attacks upon all who demonstrate any disposition to forget 
the respect they owe to the Star Spangled Banner. 

Mayor Cotterill's attempt to suppress the liberty of the 
press is inexcusable. But when that attempt is made in a man- 
ner apparently justifying the suspicion that personal animosity 
actuated it, then it becomes something much worse. 

The Industrial Workers of the World and the extreme social- 
ists of Seattle have, on more than one occasion, flaunted the 
Red Flag and insulted the one they are living under. And 
they have not been dealt with quite as severely as they should 
have been. 

While the citizens, and those others who participated in the 
riots, were not altogether justified in taking matters into their 
own hands, the fact remains that the action of the Times in 
demanding respect for the American flag was no justification 
for the action of the Mayor in attempting to suppress its pub- 
lication. The sympathy of all who desire a fearless stand and 
dislike petty spite and weakness, which encourages what it 
presumes to put a stop to, cannot but be on the side of the 
Seattle editor. 

The Southern Democratic League 
Hall for Governor. of California was the first to launch 

the boom which it is said is likely 
to enlist every fighting Democrat in the State in a deter- 
mined effort to place Fred H. Hall in the Gubernatorial chair 
next year. 

The first step in the boom for the nomination of Hall was 
made on Saturday last when the Southern Democrats tendered 
the Bakersfield man a banquet in Los Angeles, at which was 
present a representative gathering from almost all sections. 
Hall was formerly assemblyman from Kern County, and is a 
well-known business man of sterling worth, and one whom his 
backers feel confident will receive the support of every man 
in the party. 

The leaders of the movement which is being gradually ad- 
mitted is a forlorn hope, now that the people have become ac- 
quainted with just what measure of progress is represented in 
the work of the present administration at Sacramento, have 
been amusing themselves with speculations as to just how the 
Democrats will be able to pacify the warring factions in their 
party in order to even make a showing at the next election. 

But it is generally admitted that the launching of the Hall 
boom has taken some of the wind out of the Progressive sails, 
and they fear that their days are really numbered. Those 
who should know say that Hall is the one man who can be re- 
lied upon to gain the combined support of the whole party. 
And. judging from his business and public record, Hall is a 
likely looking possibility. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



LOST OPPORTUNITY (?) 



Under the caption, "Opportunity Lost," Chester Rowell of 
Fresno has contributed an article in the California Outlook, in 
which he refers to the recent celebration of the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the battle of Gettysburg as affording an opportunity 
for a distinguished public utterance from the man who is 
President of the United States and the first Southerner to be 
elected to that office since the Civil War. 

And Chester Rowell therein places himself on record as of 
the opinion that President Wilson failed to take advantage of 
his opportunity. "It is a pity," writes Mr. Rowell, "to let so 
great an opportunity go by without leaving behind it a single 
memorable phrase or one concrete intelligible thought." 

Of course, Mr. Rowell is entitled to set whatever standards 
he sees fit. It is not, perhaps, his fault that he cannot agree 
with such critics as the Springfield Republican, which described 
the President's address as a "noble utterance of unmistakable 
power and imaginative beauty." Nevertheless, we regret the 
evident limitations of Mr. Rowell's ability to understand and 
appreciate his own language when it touches heights which rise 
above mere frothy jingoism and empty, florid sentiment. 

Says Editor Rowell : "President Wilson's Gettysburg address 
illustrates once more the peculiar limitations of the President's 
style, both of language and of thought." 

In marked contrast is the opinion. expressed by another news- 
paper editor who, like Mr. Rowell, would possibly be pleased 
to see another man than Woodrow Wilson in the Presidential 
chair. Says the St. Louis Globe-Democrat: "The note of re- 
consecration rings true in every line of the brief and polished 
address, which will hold high rank among printed orations. 
. . . Mr. Wilson has seen clearly the one way for him to touch 
a responsive chord in the breast of a public which, on the 
same day it read his address, would be re-reading that of 
Lincoln." 

That the address has failed to touch that chord in the breast 
of the Fresno editor is, to us, indication that his patriotism and 
citizenship is something smaller and less worthy than the 
Americanism which was appealed to in the words, "We are 
made by these tragic, epic things, to know what it costs to 
make a nation — the blood and sacrifice of multitudes of men 
lifted to a great stature in the view of all generations by know- 
ing no limit to their manly willingness to serve," followed by 
the question : "Are the forces that fight for the nation dis- 
persed, gone to their homes, forgetful of the common cause?" 
Mr. Wilson might have inserted into his address some of 
the sentiments which we are forced to believe are favored by 
Mr. Rowell. But he chose to speak the truth indispensable to 
the day and the hour — the truth which we believe will linger 
and inspire and will actuate those real builders of our nation 
who will one day present in these United States a democracy 
lespected before the World, for its true adherence to the prin- 
ciples upon which it was founded. 

That truth will appeal to those who believe with our presi- 
dent that "the day of our country's life has but broadened into 
morning." 

Was it lost opportunity when President Wilson uttered such 
words as these : 

"I have in my mind another host, whom these set free of 
civil strife in order that they might work out in days of peace 
and settled order the life of a great nation. That host is the 
people themselves, the great and the small, without class or 
difference of kind or face or origin; and undivided in interest, 
if we have but the vision to guide and direct them and order 
their lives aright in what we do. Our constitutions are their 



articles of enlistment. The orders of the day are the laws upon 
our statute books. What we strive for is their freedom, their 
right to lift themselves from day to day and behold the things 
they have hoped for, and so make way for still better days foi 
those whom they love who are to come after them. The re- 
cruits are the little children crowding in. The quartermaster's 
stores are in the mines and forests and fields, in the shops and 
factories. Every day something must be done to push the cam- 
paign forward; and it must be done by plan and with an eye 
to some great destiny." 

President Wilson appealed to Democrat and to Republican, 
to Progressive and to every man who realizes the meaning of 
citizenship, when, after giving voice to this lofty conception, 
he asked : "How shall we hold such thoughts in our hearts and 
not be moved?" 

Yet Chester Rowell, editor of the Fresno Republican, con- 
tributor to the California Outlook, and professed patriotic 
American, declares that "it was a pleasantly worded occasional 
address, which had the misfortune to be uttered at the scene of 
the greatest and most inspiring opportunity offered to an 
American ceremonial speaker of this generation." 

Are we to judge the Americanism of Progressives by the 
opinion expressed by the man who occasionally is brought to 
San Francisco as special instructor at the party's "love feasts?" 
If so, then it is little wonder that the American people refuse 
to be won by the blandishments of the mock heroes of Ar- 
mageddon. 

Because there are those among the supporters of the Progres- 
sive party who really believe that they have the right solu- 
tion for the betterment of our conditions, we venture the opin- 
ion that Chester Rowell will not win any lasting favor among 
even his own partisans by his smalfness in permitting a rather 
limited conception of true ideals of present-day citizenship to 
tempt him to condemn an address which, politics aside, echoes 
what must have been the ideals of men who shook hands after 
peace had come at last, and set their faces toward the building 
of a newer, better and a united nation. 

It seems that it is Chester Rowell who has lost an oppor- 
tunity — an opportunity to permit manhood to overcome the 
promptings of partisanship, to permit of the realization that the 
truest citizenship means the comprehension of its opportunities 
and its obligations, and to forget the politics of the man who 
spoke in rising to the appeal he uttered. 

Men like Lincoln and Wilson stood on the field of Gettys- 
burg fully realizing that they could neither consecrate nor hal- 
low that ground. Lincoln realized that it remained for those 
who lived after the battlefield had been consecrated by those 
who fell upon it, to be "dedicated to the unfinished work" 
which lay before them. President Wilson, standing upon that 
self-same hallowed spot, realized that, even now, the work is 
unfinished. And that acknowledgment is to his everlasting 
credit, calling as it did, in words of such noble grandeur and 
such lofty purpose, for patriotic and united effort toward the 
fulfillment of our mission. 

Mr. Rowell has indeed lost an opportunity if he fails to 
answer to the plea of the President made to every man, woman 
and child who is, first and last, an American. Perhaps, when 
Mr. Rowell comes to a realization of how small has been his 
Americanism, he may change — we sincerely hope so. In the 
meantime, it is for all of us to endeavor to measure up to the 
standard set for us on the field of Gettysburg, first by the 
martyr Lincoln, and now by the man who to-ciay follows in his 
footsteps, President Woodrow Wilson. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 




Attention has been called, in the columns of the News 

Letter, to the archaic methods of the San Francisco police force 
in its efforts to substitute, brutality for intelligence in the detec- 
tion of criminals. The "detinue" system, by which suspects 
are arrested and kept incommunicado, without evidence, at the 
pleasure of the police, is itself an anachronism, and, if for no 
other reason than that it is a violation of the safeguards pro- 
vided by the Constitution to every citizen, should be abolished. 
It is the very thing that led to revolutions in the past, and was 
one of the cruelties against which the United States protested 
in Cuba. Another putty-headed as well as brutal practice is 
that of insulting and goading prisoners in order to make them 
either confess, or rebel, and thus get themselves into even 
deeper difficulties. Perhaps the worst practice is that of 
parading prisoners, before they have even had a preliminary 
hearing, before a row of heavy-footed, empty-headed detec- 
tives, to whom is related a story of the crime of which the 
prisoner has not been convicted. The basis of our law is that 
every accused person is presumed innocent until proven guilty. 
Such things are not only repugnant to our whole American 
spirit, but downright violations and contempt of the law by 
the very persons supposed and paid to uphold it, in both 
theory and practice. The day is gone by when physical force 
can take the place of brains. 

Just what did Baron Crawhas mean when he said that "in 

no place in the world, not even in Paris, does woman display 
her natural beauty in more artistic fashion than in San Fran- 
cisco?" We have been waiting patiently for the dear people 
who are self-appointed guardians of our morals to make some 
cutting remarks about the Count's little compliment to our 
fair sex. We were under the impression that Paris had the 
world beat for display of "natural beauty" since the arrival 
of the "Expose gown," but here is a real Count, who should 
know, saying that San Francisco women display it, whatever 
"it" means, more artistically than any women in the world. And 
Chief Peterson of Oakland has asserted that this same artistic 
display is distorting the morals of every one beyond recogni- 
tion. Personally, I am inclined to think that somebody has 
made a mistake, but I am not prepared to say whether it is the 
police chief or the nobleman, who is evidently well satisfied 
with the San Francisco revelations. Meanwhile, it is satisfac- 
tory to the ladies themselves in that the compliment implies 
that their beauty possessions are at least natural. So much 
cannot always be said of the fair sex when they have completed 
their modern toilets and are ready for parade. In all, the Count's 
compliment was very neat — and delicate. 

And despite the opinion of the visiting Hungarian baron 

regarding the artistic display of feminine beauty in San Fran- 
cisco, word comes that the Chief of Police of Boulder has is- 
sued an order that the women of that town are to at once don 
more or thicker clothes, or less diaphanous drapery, to use 
a more artistic expression. Well, I suppose it is all in what 
one considers is the most artistic display of natural beauty. 
Perhaps those boys and men who gathered round the county 
square in Boulder to watch the parade of beauty, will consider 
mat, despite the police order, their viewpoint had its ad- 
vantages. 



When, about dinner time, or perhaps well along in the 

evening, you hear the excited voices of newsboys shouting 
"Extra!" don't stop, but keep right on at whatever you were 
engaged in at the time. The practice is a cheap device to boost 
circulation by increasing street sales, and the Bulletin is the 
chief, if not almost the only offender. Or maybe the boys 
themselves, to get rid of surplus papers, resort to it. You will 
observe that the boys always travel in pairs, so that their simul- 
taneous cries, uttered with dramatic voice, will add to the air of 
excitement, and make a general uproar, so that people will fly 
to door or window and give up a nickel to read what they have 
already read in their evening paper by carrier, or will find out, 
after purchase, is something trifling or absolutely false. Al- 
together, it looks like a cheap graft. 

A prisoner of Alameda County escaped from the county 

jail the other day by simply changing his clothes for those of 
some kind-hearted visiting friend. The fact that the prisoner 
donned women's wearing apparel had a great deal to do with 
his escape, but how this lightning change performance could 
be done with the visitors and prisoners around seems a mystery. 
Can it be that the official in charge of the jail over on the east 
side ot the bay so seldom looks the way of the fair sex that 
he did not recognize anything unusual in the departing lady, 
who in reality was none other than one of his escaping wards. 
Oakland will soon have to instruct her police officials in the 
mysteries of women's wearing apparel so that an incident like 
the above cannot take place again. 

Baseball may be a harmless game enough in well regu- 
lated and law abiding communities, but in towns and cities 
where warm blooded, enthusiastic citizens are addicted to the 
baseball habit, it is well to see that some officers of the peace 
be at hand. The recent attempt of a crowd of excited fans at 
Elmhurst to do bodily harm to the umpire, who had made an 
unpopular decision, and who was forced to protect himself at 
the point of a revolver, adds strength to the opinion that base- 
ball may sometimes become quite deadly — especially to the 
umpire. That the umpire escaped with no unpleasant memen- 
tos of the occasion other than the excitement of the episode, 
he owes to his trusty gun and the kind offices of the fire mar- 
shall who escorted him off the diamond and to safety. 

While most Americans would like to see peace descend 

upon poor, revolution-torn Mexico, and civilization take up 
her work there again, still it is doubtful that many of them 
would care to see this at the expense of recognizing the 
Huerta government down there as the Republic of Mexico. 
President Wilson probably knows what he is doing in this re- 
spect, and the country will await patiently his decision on this 
important diplomatic tangle. 

The recent exhibition of patrotic rioting in Seattle gives 

the lie to those who would tell us that love of country is dead, 
and that the flag means nothing to the average American. It 
fairly demonstrates that at least in our army and navy the re- 
spect for Old Glory is very real, and one that the sailor boys 
are prepared to demonstrate even if they have to do a little 
rough house work in illustrating their ideas. 

Experts at Washington have declared that the original 

document on which was written the Declaration of Independ- 
ence will keep longer if placed in a vacuum. An opportunity 
for Hearst to suggest having the Secretary of State memorize it. 

Mayor Cotteriil, of Seattle, and Colonel Blethen, of the 

Seattle Times, still seem to be mixing it up in the Puget Sound 
city. And the things they are saying about one another make 
us believe that they are still far from being mutual admirers. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 




Lannigan — Amateur Detective. 

A remarkably clever series of stories is wrapped around one 
Lannigan, a police reporter on a San Francisco newspaper, 
who possesses an unerring instinct for tracking down criminals 
and an indomitable will, as well as a big heart that causes him 
at times to forget the brutality of the man-hunt in his sympathy 
for the sufferings of those innocent ones whom a not too effi- 
cient police system torture in what has been called the Third 
Degree. The stories are comprised in "Lannigan, Amateur 
Detective." which is the latest arrival in bookland, and which 
promises to become a headliner among detective stories. 

The book is written by Edward H. Hurlburt, one-time police 
reporter in San Francisco, and now editor of the San Francisco 
Wasp. It is an exceptionally pathetic story, replete with in- 
tense human interest, and, while presenting a remarkable char- 
acter in remarkable achievements in the detection of crime, 
is undeniably probable, f.nd does not attain its dramatic note at 
the sacrifice of anything which will appeal to the average reader 
as perfectly natural. 

Because this new book is so natural and probable is perhaps 
the reason we feel certain of its success, and we predict a 
splendid future for the author. We cannot believe that the 
man who could produce "Lannigan" could possibly be at the 
end of his tether, and we look with pleasant anticipation for 
more stories from his pen. 

It is not the easiest thing in the world to write such stories as 
these, but the author, in a direct, forcible manner, has so pre- 
sented them that they will reach all classes of people and in- 
terest them. They are romantic as well as thrilling, and pos- 
sess a snap or "punch" which no reader can fail to appreciate. 
The book is published by Sturgis & Walton, New York. 
Price, $1.25. 



Gettysburg. 
It is appropriate that the labor of years, which Jessie Bow- 
man Young has spent in collecting and analyzing material for 
his comprehensive narrative, "The Battle of Gettysburg," 
should be crowned by the publication of the book almost upon 
the anniversary of the battle and at a time when the attention 
of the whole country is turned toward the former battle-field. 
But the book is far from being of the sort which bases its chief 
claim to interest upon timeliness. As a fresh survey of the 
campaign and battle, including every fact of importance, writ- 
ten with vividness of reminiscence, and characterized by a 
clearness and definiteness that result from the author's long 
familiarity with the region in which the battle was fought, 
"The Battle of Gettysburg" has a permanent and distinctive 
value. Mr. Young was an officer in the battle, and his duties 
as assistant provost marshal assigned to the headquarters of 
Brigadier-General Andrew Humpreys gave him unusual oppor- 
tunities for observation both on the march and in the thick of 
the fight. For a dozen years after the war he resided in the 
Cumberland Valley, and in Adams County, of which Gettys- 
burg is the county-seat — for three years of this time in Gettys- 
burg itself. "During these years,"" he writes, "the different 
landscapes, along with the incidents and movements of the 
campaign, wove themselves into panoramic visions in my brain 
so vividly that they have become an indelible part of my ex- 
perience." As a "circuit-rider" he journeyed over all the roads 
traversed by the two armies, and while in Gettysburg he came 
to know every foot of the great battle-field and the location 
of every organization which took part in the engagements. 
Few men, we imagine, have ever attained such a clearly and 
throughly inter-related conception of any great battle. The 
author has supplemented his personal knowledge by wide read- 
ing and close study of military problems involved. In ad- 
dition, the book contains many personal sketches, and a special 
feature is its compact array of the record of all West Point 
graduates who served in the campaign and battle on either 



side. The student of history, the student of warfare, the 
veteran of the war, will each find "The Battle of Gettysburg" 
of peculiar interest from his own point of view. To the gen- 
eral reader it presents a wonderful picture of two great armies 
in action. 

Published by Harper Brothers. 



"The Social Rubaiyat of a Bud." 
Paul Elder & Company, of San Francisco, announce that they 
have a most unique little volume in press to appear for the holi- 
day season that is in a delicate, sparkling manner a satire of 
the Social Institution. It is "The Social Rubaiyat of a Bud," 
by Mrs. Ambrose Madison Willis. In a very clever manner it 
shows behind the scenes in V. nity Fair with Cupid out of work, 
while the up-to-date Bud is mistress of her own heart, which 
she unlocks at will — but only with a golden key. The book, 
most appropriately, is to be printed in purple and gold, and is 
to have illustrations and embellishments by Elsie A. Harrison, 
a London artist. It will be one of the clever volumes for which 
these publishers are noted. 



Masefield Uniform Edition. 
John Masefield's three books have recently been brought out 
in a new edition uniformly bound in plain red cloth and gold 
lettering. Mr. Masefield is an author who believes in constant 
revision; consequently these issues are not merely reprints — 
except in the case of "The Daffodil Fields." "The Everlasting 
Mercy," which is bound with "The Widow in the Bye Street," 
embodies a number of changes and includes a new stanza, 
while "Dauber," the principal poem in the third volume, "The 
Story of a Round House," has been very extensively revised, 
some verses being taken out, others added, and almost all of 
them having been altered to a greater or less extent. 



California's Four Literary Giants. 
Herman Whitaker, author of "The Mystery of the Barranca," 
has lately been characterized by a critic as one of the "four 
California literary giants" — the others being the late Frank 
Norris, Jack London and John Fleming Wilson. But it will 
be remembered that Mr. Whitaker has been a Californian only 
since 1895. His interest in Mexico, the scene of "The Mystery 
of the Barranca," as of his other novels, dates from his first 
visit to that country in 1904. Mr. Whitaker acknowledged in 
a private letter that the life he set forth in "The Planter" with 
its descriptions of conditions on the rubber plantation he had 
"actually lived for a period of six months on the Colorado 
River — in the State of Vera Cruz — only it was much worse 
than J. ever dared to put down in the book." 



Through the Balkans. 
Mr. Robert Hichens and Mr. Jules Guerin traveled through 
the Balkan Peninsula to gather material for the articles which 
have been running through The Century Magazine this year, 
and for the elaborate book which The Century Co. will publish 
in the late fall. The text and pictures — twelve in the colors 
of Mr. Guerin's canvases — will cover the natural scenic glories 
of Dalmatia, the classic ruins of Greece, and the wonderful 
mosques of old Constantinople. 



CHAMPAGNE 



PIPER-HEIDSIECK 



Anc n - e M°- n HEIDSIECK fondee en 1785 
KUNKELMANN &C? Succ r . s 

REIMS 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



A*iht« Pacific Coast 



314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



Efc Mini/tar of- Yom&t Affainr 



The Time for Action. 

The manner in which the Balkan embroglio continues to oc- 
cupy the diplomacy of Europe is growing more wearisome and 
perplexing. While Europe calls upon the United States to put 
an end to the atrocities and turmoil in Mexico, she is permitting 
wars and rumors of wars and constant equally atrocious actions 
to rend the Balkan peninsula. 

It would seem that the Powers are remiss in their duty to 
humanity, and their censure of the United States for her appar- 
ent lack of interest in Mexico is misplaced. Vast territories in 
Southern Europe are being laid waste, and thousands are ren- 
dered homeless. Lives have been sacrificed and are being 
sacrificed in strife which has no excuse for existence. 

Trade throughout the Balkans is stagnant, and the effect 
is felt in the commercial centers of the world. Agriculture 
and commerce are at a standstill, and all financial schemes 
for the regeneration of Macedonia are impossible. 

No matter what was the meaning of the original struggle, or 
no matter how much good was accomplished in the reduction 
of Turkey to a mere husk among the nations, the fact remains 
that the struggles now going on as an aftermath of the Turko- 
Balkan war are sordid and a disgrace to civilized Europe. 

The moral force behind the alliance which made possible 
the final readjustment of the wrongs of the little Balkan States 
was a great one, and held the sympathy of all nations. But 
there can be found no excuse for the petty animosities which 
now rend those who were not so long ago fighting a common 
cause. 

The French president has been appealed to, and the warring 
factions in Roumania and Bulgaria have signified their wish 



that he settle their disputes. What is Europe going to do about 
it ? That the Powers. England, France and Russia, can readily 
put an end to all the strife, so that all sides will be satisfied, 
is acknowledged by all leading authorities and newspapers on 
the Continent. And it is their duty to do so. 

But apparently the Balkan States believe that real action on 
the part of a united Europe is something verging on impossi- 
bility. Perhaps that is why they flaunt all advices and sneer 
at their great neighbors and continue the atrocities which are 
as bad, if not worse, than those uncivilized ones in Mexico. 
While concerted action by the Powers might prove to be diffi- 
cult and perhaps dangerous, there does not seem to be any ex- 
cuse for inaction. 

The pressure brought to bear on the warring factions thus 
far has been weak, and there is demand for something more 
unmistakable. The great Powers owe it to themselves, to the 
Balkan States and to the world at large to at once put an end 
to all squabbling and evasions. In the words of the London 
Daily Express, the alternative is "a fresh installment of chaos, 
with new threats to Europe's peace." 



German Prosperity. 
Sir Francis Oppenheimer, commercial attache to the British 
Embassy in Berlin, in his annual report on the trade of Ger- 
many, shows that 1912 was a year of unexampled prosperity. 
It was a record year for German farms, factories, railways, and 
steamships. The railways had not enough wagons to handle 
the merchandise, and a loan of $135,000,000 was issued to in- 
crease facilities. The number of emigrants was considerably 
lower than 1911, "which," says Sir Francis Oppenheimer, "re- 
flects the prosperous condition of German industry during the 
year." 



"Henry, it says here that Mr. Jackson pelted the pill 

for three sacks. What does it mean?" "Good heavens, Mary, 
can't you understand plain English ? It means that he slugged 
the sphere safe and landed on the third pillow." — Chicago Rec- 
ord-Herald. 



TRIUMPHANT 

GOLDEN STATE CHAMPAGNE 

Wins Another "Grand Prix" 
at Ghent, Belgium 

We are just in receipt of advices from Francis Hope of the California Development Board, 
who is in charge of the California State Exhibit at the Exposition Universelle et Internationale, 
at Ghent, Belgium, that our GOLDEN STATE Extra Dry Champagne was awarded the "Grand 
Prix" by a jury consisting of thirty-three famous wine tasters (twenty-five of whom were 
French.) 

It will be remembered that in October, 1911, this exquisite wine also won the "Grand Prix" 
at the International Exposition at Turin, Italy. 

This remarkable recognition received in Italy and Belgium ought to convince American con- 
noisseurs (and California wine drinkers in particular) that GOLDEN STATE Extra Dry Cham- 
pagne, which is served everywhere, IS NOT SURPASSED BY ANY FOREIGN BRAND, 
AND SHOULD BE USED IN PREFERENCE BY EVERY LOYAL CAL1FORNIAN. 



ITALIAN-SWISS COLONY 

Main Office : Battery and Greenwich Sts. San Francisco, California 




San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



PARIS IN 1913 



It might be interesting to tell you that in Paris there are 
no closing hours for refreshment places, and it might also in- 
terest all American citizens, both male and female, that in all 
parts of Europe my travels so far have yet to produce any man 
or woman incapacitated from liquor, and yet it is universally 
used, but discreetly, decently and moderately. I think we had 
better revoke the national law against the "canteen," 
achieved by misguided women, and save our boys from worse 
evils than beer. This evil, cocaine and morphine, is just now 
setting France to thinking. France also has passed restrictive 
military measures regarding stimulants, and they have finally 
realized the error. The indulgence in mild stimulants, such as 
beer, white wine or claret, never affected the rank and file either 
mentally or physically, but the deprivation enforced by army 
regulations has produced most deleterious results, and tends 
toward the undermining of the young French physique. It is 
my personal opinion, from careful inquiry and observation, 
that the "canteen" in the U. S. Army should be restored and 
put under the same rules as formerly. I have seen and heard 
too much in Europe and America to realize the greater evils 
that follow it; abolition. So let us use common sense and take 
the lesser evil. 

There is a peculiar atmosphere about Paris life that is diffi- 
cult to explain to those who never visited it. It has a decided 
individuality of its own, and a sort of refreshing "mental tem- 
perature" (if you may so term it), that you feel free from all 
restraint at any hour of the day or night. It has room for both 
the saint and the "would be," the "might be," the "don't care 
because nobody knows me," and the sinner, but it can accom- 
modate all classes, either separately or collectively. The room 
is usually occupied by the fourth class, "because nobody knows 
me." As to the night cafes, a little comment might be of inter- 
est. Maxims, of which we all have' heard so much, and which 
was so adroitly exploited in "The Merry Widow," is still at the 
same old stand, but, on account of change of management, and 
being run on corporation rules, it has lost its individuality, and 
its present patronage is absolutely the mediocre of Paris, both 
as to visitors and well dressed ladies. The Moulin Rouge 
practically comes under the same head, and it is really nothing 
more than a free and easy ball room. 

The old celebrated Cafe Anglais closed just one day before 
we reached Paris, I regretted it in one way, and was not dis- 
appointed in another. It was the most celebrated cafe in all 
Paris on the Avenue des l'Opera, and was the rendezvous of 
kings, princes, dukes, and in fact all the royalty of Europe. 
Others went there also, both to see royalty and feel the tinge 
of the atmosphere, as well as to pay from $20 to $30 per plate 
for the "service." This is the other way I was not disappointed. 

The Folies Bergere is the most interesting place of its kind. 
It consists of a vaudeville show, fairly good, but it produces 
some of the most stylishly dressed women in Paris in a place 
of this character, and who are not over-particular about a for- 
mal introduction. 

The Abbeye Albert is now the "Maxims" of Paris, and is 
the swellest and most popular. Here they have the best enter- 
tainers and the best music, and it is frequented after the theatre 
hours by the best theatrical talent, who occasionally favor 
the guests with a free exhibition. 

Seats here are not charged for, but you cannot sit down un- 
less you order a bottle of champagne. If must be served to 
you, but you are not compelled to drink it!! It is certainly a 
beautifully equipped place. Gorgeousness surrounds you on 
all sides, and while frivolity prevails and Bacchus is king, 
yet geniality on the part of both sexes is strikingly noticeable, 
and this obtains in all Parisian resorts. 

The resort which has also succeeded Maxims in its line is 
the Bal Tabarin, which might be described as a "high class 
dance house." The principal entertainment is music and fe- 
male dancers, who are not very particular about showing an 
inch or so above the shoe. 

As prefixed, I have avoided any general description of public 
places, because they are fairly well known, and any correspond- 
ent could write tomes on any one structure. I think that the 
social night life of Paris will prove more entertaining to the 
average reader. I could tell you about three trips to the top 
of the Eiffel Tower, of several trips to the famous Louvre, of 
the underground railways and sewers and many other places 



of interest, but each one would deserve a long letter, and could 
be found in many books on Paris. For that reason I have con- 
fined this letter to "lighter" subjects, just to be different from 
other published writings. So in this connection, I might men- 
tion a quaint exhibition at "The Circus" we saw on the Rue St. 
Honore. The interior resembled a regular circus ring, about 60 
feet in diameter. All the stage setting is done in full view of 
the audience, and the "flies" are above in evidence. The most 
novel features were a roof scene at night with a chorus of live 
cats, and another of huge water lilies and human "flying an- 
gels" (ten in all), together with live ducks and swans, floating 
in a mechanically filled tank, covering the_ full area of the cir- 
cus arena. It took two minutes only to fill it. 

Versailles and Fontainebleau, both a short distance from 
Paris, are two beauty spots, and really worthy of an independ- 
ent description each, but time will not permit. They show many 
historical evidences of Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and Napo- 
leon I, which could take pages to tell about. Marie and Louis 
were mutually accommodating, for they occupied separate pal- 
aces, thereby being free from intrusion when receiving their 
various "friends." 

The Hall of Justice in Paris might be worth mentioning. 
The Court of Appeals here corresponds to the U. S. Supreme 
Court, that is, the highest in France. No lawyers are allowed 
to plead there. The Chief Justice reads the testimony, and any 
questions arising are discussed by the justices themselves. 

Carriages are almost exterminated in Paris. The taxi hire is 
very cheap. You can jump in for a ride of half a mile for 75 
centimes (15 cents), and while they charge by the kilometer, it 
will average about 80 cents to $1 by the hour, including short 
stops. Tips, of course, of about 10 per cent are necessary in 
addition to the charge. Hotels are very reasonable, and at the 
best you can obtain an outside room with bath, including meals, 
for $8 a day for two people. The best compliment I can pay 
Paris is to say that I thought it sufficiently interesting and at- 
tractive to remain there six weeks. 

Very truly yours, 

William V. Bryan. 



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ban. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 




PLyE/ASURD'S 



'We obey no wand hut Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 

ISy Pfinnfi Qetrs®ia 





Gus Edwards' "Kid Kabaret," at the Orpheum Sunday afternoon. 



The Orpheum. 

The program this week opens with Theodore Bendix and 
his splendid musicians, and closes with an elephant act, which 
illustrates and exemplifies the fact that in vaudeville we can 
witness the absolute extremes in entertainment. A more lit- 
eral application to the vaudeville form of amusement should 
be called "variety;" in fact, vaudeville is supposed to convey 
this idea. The Orpheum this week certainly does offer almost 
every branch of the vaudeville world, from an animal act to a 
chamber concert. Bendix and his players give us another de- 
lightful musical treat, their program including some musical 
gems which the quartette do in a masterly manner. They are 
an innovation in vaudeville and an acquisition which everybody 
who loves good music appreciates. Ida O'Day is an extremely 
good-looking girl, who sings several songs attired in fetching 
costumes. Miss O'Day is a pleasing personality, and she wins 
her audience. She proves a capital entertainer. Hal Davis 
and Inez Macaulay and Sara Lewis present a tabloid comedy 
which is entitled "The Girl from Child's." Inasmuch as in 
two acts this week reference is made to Child's, be it known 
that there is a string of quick lunch counters in New York by 
this name. In this act, a former waitress at one of the many 
Child places is the heroine. The act is mildly amusing, and 
does not offend, and though the laughs are not many, the act 
has quite a little merit. Hal Davis is a comedian of more 
than ordinary ability, and his associates are effective aids. 
Irene Franklin scores as heavily as she did last week, though 
her selections this week are not so happily chosen as before, 
but even as it is, the audience clamors for more and more. 
They would be willing to keep Miss Franklin busy for an hour 
or more if the opportunity afforded. We ought to be proud of 
Miss Franklin and her success, as during the last few years we 
have had a perfect swarm of music hall character singers from 
London, a strong intimation that over here we have nobody 
as clever as our English cousins in this kind of work. Miss 
Franklin effectually dispels this idea, as Alice Lloyd and the 



others never scored a greater success than our own Miss Frank- 
lin. Indeed, the Orpheum announces that she is to be retained 
for a third week, which in itself is almost an extraordinary 
proceeding for our local Orpheum Theatre to do. Do not miss 
her, as she is a thorough artist, and her songs are original; 
in fact, she composes the lyrics and Burt Green, who presides 
at the piano, and who, in private life, is her husband, com- 
poses the music, and the result is surprisingly good, as every 
one of her songs is interesting and really musical. 

Val Harris, Rita Boland and Lou Holtz present an affair 
which is called "Three in One," the program informing us that 
it was written and produced by Elsie Janis. If this is the test 
Miss Janis can do, she had better stick to the particular line 
of work in which she has achieved a large success, as her effort 
as an author and producer is simply awful. There is not one 
commendable thing about the act, and even the people are not 
what they should be. Fortunately the act is a short one, and 
the agony is soon over. Lamberti, who styles himself "The 
Master Musician," has a clever act. He makes up in view 
of the audience as some of the old music masters, and he plays 
on the piano and violin and the 'cello with a remarkable dis- 
play of musicianly technique. The act is unique and very 



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10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



entertaining. Pat Rooney and his clever wife, Marion Bent, 
are back again, and create the same furore as before. Pat 
Rboney is the son of his father, all right, and bids fair to be- 
come even more famous than his father. You must see him to 
appreciate him. Miss Orford has a wonderful elephant act, 
using three of them, two being huge monsters, and completely 
filling the Orpheum stage. It is really a wonderful act, a fitting 
climax to a splendid program. 

* * * 

"The Mikado" at the Tivoli. 

It is indeed gratifying to note the steadily growing interest 
which is being manifested in the Tivoli productions, and it is 
only a matter of time when this theatre will be as high in pub- 
lic, estimation and favor as it was in its most prosperous days, 
and these conditions are going to happen within the space of 
the next few months. They are doing wonderful things at 
this theatre nowadays in many directions, and the satisfactory 
part of it is that the performances are taking on a greater de- 
gree of excellence every week. When it is taken into considera- 
tion that the company had five days in which to rehearse "The 
Mikado," you will certainly give utterance to words of com- 
mendation and admiration, as the performance in every depart- 
ment is a sheer delight. The company, as a whole, conforms 
to the best traditions of Gilbert and Sullivan, and as a matter 
of comparison, I would go further and state that the perform- 
ance at the Tivoli this week is far superior to that seen at an- 
other theatre last season, with an all-star cast. There are 
many reasons for this, the principal one being that the Tivoli 
organization did not try to revise the opera, but gave it as it 
was originally written, and the Tivoli comedians did not try 
to improve on Gilbert. For this we are thankful. The present 
flood of cheap musical comedies has tempted the managers 
to bring them to a musical comedy level. Be it known that 
the Tivoli was never guilty of such proceedings. The Tivoli 
is exactly what it claims to be, "The home of opera," and when 
you go there you can safely assume that you will see the operas 
in their original form, adhering to the original text in both 
libretto and music. Inasmuch as we are having a revival of 
the Gilbert and Sullivan operas, I should like to see a revival 
of many of the former brilliant gems of light opera which are 
absolutely new to this generation to which I have had occasion 
to refer lately. And what a delight it will be to them to revel 
in the beauties of the music of the old giants of this kind of 
opera. It will, furthermore, be a literal and liberal education 
for them, and convincingly emphasize the fact that salacious- 
ness is not the prime factor for musical success. 

I want to give praise to the Tivoli organization for an all- 
round fine performance. Pitkin is good as the Mikado, a 
characterization which could not be improved. John Phillips 
is very satisfactory as Nanki-Poo, and Teddy Webb comes into 
his own as Ko-Ko. He does not burlesque the role as we saw 
DeWolf Hopper do last season, and the result is pleasing and 
eminently satisfactory. Charles Galagher is capital as Pooh- 
Bah, and his voice is a pleasure to listen to. Henry Santrey 
as Pish-Tush does not have much of an opportunity, but he is 
as reliable and conscientious as he has been in everything he 
has shown us thus far. A word for Robert Ryles, who does a 
"bit" in an original manner which shows that he possesses 
considerable ability. Rena Vivienne, who does Yum- Yum, is 
unusually good, and her singing is always a pleasure to listen 
to. She is at home in this kind of a character, inasmuch as 
she scored a large success in "Madame Butterfly" some years 
ago. Sarah Edwards scores the biggest success of her present 
season as Katisha. The best performance of the part I have 
seen in years. The chorus, in their various ensembles, show 
excellent discretion, and their voices blend harmoniously. 
There is a sincerity evinced by the entire organization which is 
an object lesson, and for this, many thanks to Edward Temple, 
the stage director, and to Hans Linne, the musical director. 
The settings are fine, and the houses very large, and the audi- 
ences enthusiastic, all of which augurs well for the welfare 

of the new Tivoli. 

* * * 

Pantages Theatre. 

Heading the bill at Pantages this week is Arthur Pelky, the 
man who was recently acknowledged the heavy-weight cham- 
pion of the world. Pelky is a new-comer, having sprung into 
prominence over-night, and this is his first appearance in this 



city. With him is his manager, Tommy Burns, who, despite 
the fact that he is burdened with considerable superfluous flesh, 
goes two fast rounds with his big protege. On the same bill, 
and sharing headline honors, is Mrs. Bob Fitzsimmons, sup- 
ported by Charles Dano, of "Chocolate Soldier" fame, and a 
company of fourteen, in an elaborate musical extravaganza; 
"A Bulgarian Romance." Mrs. Fitzsimmons, as Julia Gifford, 
will be remembered for her beautiful lyric soprano voice, and 
she more than sustains her reputation. The act is elaborate, 
the dancing of Mrs. Fitzsimmons and Dano being a feature. A 
real live comedy playlet, well staged, is "The Newly Married 
Man," presented by Bernard and Herrington. The comedy is 
wholesome and mirth-inspiring, arid without any of those fea- 
tures which so often turn such acts into mere buffoonery and 
more or less vulgar horseplay. Without doubt this little sketch 
is one of the most popular hits scored on the Pantages circuit. 
Sylvester and Vance present a pleasing singing and dancing 
act, while Billy Dodge, represented as the Beau Brummel song- 
ster, wins enthusiastic applause for real imitations of famous 
singers and character actors. Alsace and Lorraine present a 
beautiful scenic musical offering, both clever and enjoyable, 
and the Mars Duo do some thrilling acrobatic stunts. Keystone 
comedy motion pictures conclude an exceptionally well bal- 
anced bill. 

* * * 

Creatore Coming. — Creatore, the most sensational band 
master in the world, is coming all the way from the East 
with his full Italian organization of fifty pieces for a special 
engagement at the Mechanics' Fair in San Francisco next fall. 
Such was the purport of a telegram just received by the direc- 
tors of the big exposition from John Palmer Slocum. 

The range and versatility of this great band master — who 
can render a Victor Herbert comic opera gem with as much 
animation as a Wagnerian symphony — make him capable of 
pleasing all types of audiences, and of making appeal to every 
musical preference. He has been the "lion" of the most pro- 
found musical festivals of both this country and Europe, while 
at other times he has run through more vivacious and popular 
theatre seasons with equally as great success. He recently 
opened Hammerstein's Roof Gardens in New York with a ten 
weeks' engagement, and just previous to that had played in 
the Schlitz Palm Garden in Milwaukee with so great success 
that his season was increased to three times its original intent. 



BRYAN ON TOUR. 



Secretary Bryan will deliver lectures before Chautauquas 
in the Middle West this summer. It is something quite awful, 
and there are papers saying so. Mr. Taft, when President, was 
away from Washington months at a time each year, delivering 
speeches by the score. He holds all records — car miles, num- 
ber of States visited and banquets. 

When Mr. Root was Secretary of State he made a tour of 
South America, speaking at innumerable places, and during 
the months of his journey many things of importance to his 
department did happen; for example, the Cuban insurrection 
of 1906 and the subsequent American intervention. Secretary 
Knox traveled in Latin-America, delivered speeches enough 
to fill a book, and he made also a journey to Japan. The 
Mexican crisis became acute while Secretary Knox was at- 
tending the Mikado's funeral. And so Secretary Bryan is not 
the only American Secretary of State to get away from Wash- 
ington on speech-making tours. The main difference between 
him and his predecessors thus far is that he stays in the 
United States and does his talking to his own people. Those 
who say it is highly improper for Secretary Bryan to leave 
Washington and his diplomatic duties, say he is not fit to be 
Secretary of State, anyway. They ought to be glad when he 
goes off to Indiana and leaves the job in the competent hands' 
of John Bassett Moore. If Secretary Bryan should now use 
the Chautauqua circuit for political purposes, as Senator La 
Follette has always used it, the demand for his return to Wash- 
ington and diplomacy would redouble in volume. Some time 
it may be discovered just why Mr. Bryan was put in the Cabi- 
net. — Springfield Weekly Republican. 



"Daughter and her beau must have had a terrible quar- 
rel." "Why so, ma?" "Five pounds of candy, a bunch of roses 
and two matinee tickets have just arrived." — Judge. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



RURAL CREDITS IN HUNGARY. 

The American commission on agricultural organization, co- 
operation and rural credits, while investigating conditions in 
Austria-Hungary, found that agriculture there had been largely 
complicated by the extreme class distinctions among the popu- 
lation and also by political troubles mainly based upon racial 
divisions. The commission saw little in Hungary which might 
be said to point the moral of self-help. 

The most interesting day's work was a visit paid to the gov- 
ernment farm at Meso-Hegyes, a few hours' run from Buda- 
pest. This farm consisted of 55,000 acres of very level and ap- 
parently quite fertile lands; it belonged entirely to the govern- 
ment, but it evidently was not in the nature of an experimental 
or educational institution, but was being run as a business 
enterprise. 

A stud farm, a fertilizer plant, and a machine repair shop 
formed part of the equipment of the farm. A small group of 
buffaloes, occasionally used for drafts, look enormously strong. 
Thoroughbred and half-breed stallions, some hundred or so, 
were put through their paces by cavalry soldiers. The stock 
was mainly English or Norman, but like everything else of the 
farm, showed signs of great off-breeding, so that there is no 
quite distinctive type. 

The purpose of these horses is simply to serve the army in 
time of war. There were also whole byres full of draft oxen. 
The whole of this village was inhabited by soldiers; it formed, 
in fact, a sort of country barracks, serving the double purpose 
of keeping the soldiers healthy and interested in matters agri- 
cultural, and providing resources for their maintenance and 
equipment in time of war. 

In Budapest the work the government has done to further co- 
operation in agriculture is certainly more State-aid than co- 
operation. The keystone of the situation is the land mortgage 
bank which is a more or less co-operative institution for land- 
owners, for raising money on the security of their property. 
Most of the capital was, provided by the State. It was based 
on the absolute security of titles, brought about in the follow- 
ing way : 

Throughout the Austrian Empire at every provincial capital 
is kept a "land-book." In this book is recorded the name and 
address of every landowner, with the amount of land he owns, 
the grade of each field (all land is divided into first, second 
and third class), the estimated value of land and stock, and 
finally all encumbrances or obligations which lie against such 
land. No man may effect any transaction such as buying or 
selling or mortgaging land without recording it in this book, 
on penalty of imprisonment. The records are open to inspection 
by all, and for a small fee any person may have the page 
affecting a certain farmer copied out by the officials and for- 
warded to him. Hejice any one who wishes to buy land or to 
advance money on it has certainly only himself to blame if he 
allows himself to be cheated. 

In Budapest there is a very large co-operative store for agri- 
cultural purposes which has branches throughout the country, 
and a milk distributing plant for the city. This latter appeared 
to be truly co-operative and quite independent of the govern- 
ment. Its members were mainly large farmers, who kept up 
an even supply of milk, and it seemed from its records to be 
prospering exceedingly.— Exchange. 



THE HIGHER LIVING VS. THE MORE EXPENSIVE. 

The time was, easily within the recollection of any man who 
has survived his generation, when the American ideal was 
higher living instead of the higher cost living which comes of 
greed for the cheapening of the creature comforts, the grossly 
appreciable advantages, material, mental and moral. Yet our 
present recrudescence is not wholly ungenerous, if our lower 
ideal is that not a few but all share these advantages; that 
none shall be left behind or aside in the race for them. But 
undeniably we had once a fineness of ideal from which the 
present ideal has coarsened. In that former time our litera- 
ture expressed a longing for the beauty which is truth; neither 
Longfellow, nor Lowell, nor Whittier could be content with the 
lovely line alone; its curve must lead to the straight and narrow 
path which few find but none need miss ; it was sometinv 
torced to this office.— H'. D. Hon-ells. in Harpefs Magazine for 



THE MINIMUM WAGE QUESTION. 
The Springfield Republican, in a current issue, remarks that 
"The argument for the minimum wage based on the alleged 
frailty of the working girl's virtue has been so completely dis- 
credited the past spring that social reformers now advise 
dgainst using it. Its burial seems to have taken place last 
week at the national conference of charities and correction at 
Seattle, when one of the speakers declared: 'It is indeed, fun- 
damentally a moral issue, one of social justice, but its relation 
to sex morality can easily be emphasized too much. The in- 
sinuation that underpaid girls are largely immoral, and that 
the increase in wages is going to make it possible for them to 
lead moral lives is false in fact and dangerous in policy. Girls 
will not co-operate with reformers who begin by casting reflec- 
tion on their virtue.' The wave of agitation concerning this 
question which swept over the country in the late winter and 
early spring was beneficial, however, if for no other reason 
than that it disclosed the limits of sound argument." 



THE RETORT COURTEOUS. 

Here is a little glimpse of Thackeray that may give a. hint 
of why he could write so subjectively of certain types in 
society. While on a lecture tour through the South, this 
writer — who is supposed to have taught the brotherhood of 
man — was a guest at a reception given in his honor by an 
eminent jurist. The Judge, tradition tells us (and, as the au- 
thor of "The Book of Snobs" himself would say: "I pledge my 
sacred honor it is true"), had a very brilliant and witty young 
married daughter, who through the daring unconventionally of 
her conduct had gained the reputation of being extremely fast 
for her section of the country. 

This local celebrity arrived at the reception late — probably 
in order to lend point to her corning — and was already sur- 
rounded by a crowd of admirers when her father led up the 
iion for presentation. 

"Ah," breathed the great novelist in his suavest manner, 
holding her hand impressively and beaming upon her through 
his glasses; "I can't express my pleasure at meeting so famous 
a character as you are From what I have heard of you I now 
have the distinction of knowing the very fastest woman in the 
State." 

"Oh, Mr. Thackeray," flashed back the young creature, with 
a severely merry smile, "we must never believe everything we 
hear. / heard that I was going lo meet a gentleman this even- 
ing." — Neale's Magazine. 



Aunt Cindy was running around the yard in the rear of 

her cabin seeking to drive into her henhouse a dozen or so of 
chickens that seemed anxious to go anywhere but in the hen- 
house. "Why do you go to all that trouble, Aunt Cindy?" 
asked a passer-by. "Don't you know that chickens come home 
to roost?" "Sho', I knows it, white folk," answered Aunt 
Cindy, "an' dat's de trouble — dey's gain' home to roos'!" — 
New York Evening Post. 



Percy Noodles says, speaking of automobiles, that when 

he asked the capitalist's daughter the other night how her 
father got his start, she replied that her impression was that 
her mother found him in neutral and cranked him up. — Dallas 
News. 



Missionary (to cannibal) — What makes your chief so 

talkative to-day? Cannibal — Oh, he ate a couple of barbers 
this morning. — Minnesota Minne-Ha-Ha. 



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12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 




0°o 




otetx 



Alas; the young daughters of the Will Crocker family have 
burst into the real responsibilities of social life. They, Miss 
Ethel and Miss Helen, have been sued for automobiling over 
somebody and his wife ! The accident is said to have occurred 
last September, and, woe upon woe, is said to have left some- 
body's wife so morose as to have led to a family separation! 
Now, isn't that a disturbing thought to two pretty debutantes 
full of the romance of life! Miss Ethel recently returned from 
a presentation at England's court, but plaintiff' saith not whether 
he believes the motor attack to have been committed in an 
effort to reach a speed satisfactory to the British social elect, 
though every one agrees that Miss Ethel met all requirements 
of our fastidious insular cousins. Both she and her sister are 
modest and gentle girls, and it is safe to say that whatever 
the lawsuit's merits, they would both be genuinely regretful of 
any harm done on their September airing. 

At present, however, neither seems overwhelmed by the pros- 
pect of a new court experience, assuming the matter to be but 
one of the burdens of wealth and social position. Miss Ethel 
is very busy assembling and rehearsing a group of young 
friends who are to present a French play before a favored few. 
Both the Crocker girls speak French "like ze natif," and in 
their own youthful set are to be found many others who can . 
read a French menu aloud, without losing the respect of the 
waiter. So their little Comedie Francais will undoubtedly be 
spoken in a manner to satisfy the ear of the Divine Sara her- 
self. 

© © © 

Certainly we were r>ll startled to learn that Seyd Havens. and 
his stunning bride, Sue Miller, had so early decided to dwell 
apart. Scarcely had we learned of their engagement before 
we were told "it was not so to be." And while we were trying 
to get accustomed to that shattering of a happy romance, we 
all woke up one morning to read in the papers that the win- 
some Sue had wed the wistful Seyd, at ten-thirty the night be- 
fore. They started off merrily on their honeymoon, and while 
Oakland society and all the other cliques that knew the 
'ortunate young people were still breathless at the sudden wed- 
ding, comes a wire from New York that Haven has left his wife 
in Calgary "to get a divorce or do what she likes." The 
terse telegram from the bride of a few days to her parents, con- 
firming this startling news has caused their many friends deep 
regret. Both young folk are high-strung and temperamental, 
and we may yet hear that once more, hand in hand, they're 
"gone again." 

© © © 

Quite as mysterious in its way was the marriage of General 
U. S. Grant, son of the famous war hero, and Mrs. America — 
plus two names — Wills. Now that they are on the high seas 
bound for Australia, we can settle down and try to figure 
whether or not the Grant family wanted a second mamma, 
and whether or not the happy groom of sixty did make his 
blushing thrice wed bride of thirty-one a pre-mortem, or what- 
ever you call it settlement of his property. The principal thing 
that seemed to worry the General, when he was here, was the 
statement that his new wife was thirty-six. This he wished 
to have corrected. As to the attitude of his family on his 
marriage, he had little definite to say. All who met the pair 
agreed to two things — that Mrs. Grant was very pretty and that 
she was quite right in saying that it isn't everyone who can 
marry the son of a former President of the United States. 
Certainly there are few of the species of real American aristo- 
cracy on the market, and can you blame a lady for reaching 
out and grabbing one, if she wanted him and had the chance ? 
With U. S. II out of the way, those ladies next wishing to make 
alliances with sons of former executives of our land of liberty, 
will have to kidnap somebody under age. Now, girls, if you 
would be satisfied with the son of a former President of Mexico, 



we could fix you up in a jiffy, at the same time furnishing you 
with a bullet-proof "going away gown." 
© © © 

There is keen excitement over the pending arrival of General 
Leonard Wood. The head of the army is to be here for the 
Bohemian Club jinks, and incidentally every one hopes for a 
chance to lionize him during his stay here. Mrs. Eleanor Mar- 
tin of course, has the first call, as she has entertained the dis- 
tinguished officer before, and there is anxiety as to just how 
large a function she will give in his honor. A small one would 
be delightfully "intime." In the meantime, the navy is having 
its innings. A closely huddled series of entertainments has 
been arranged to meet the demands of those eager to show at- 
tention to the Secretary of the Navy and his gracious lady. Mrs. 
Hearst made Mrs. Daniels the guest of honor at a large 
luncheon at the Hacienda del Poza de Verona, this Friday, 
while in the afternoon the San Francisco Civic Center's recep- 
tion at the St. Francis afforded its eleven hundred members 
and the officers and ladies of the service opportunity to greet 
the Secretary, who gave a short address. There was an im- 
posing list of names receiving with the Center's president, Mrs. 

James Ellis Tucker. 

© © © 

But for all the attention the sea-dogs of war have been re- 
ceiving, the amateur tars have not been thrust entirely out of 
the limelight. The Corinthian Yacht Club's annual sail to 
Santa Cruz drew many of the belles to that merry harbor. 
During the past week there has been a series of jolly affairs 
aboard the yachts, with short cruises about the bay, and the 
week's festivities will end with a ball in the Casino to-night. 

Much admiration was felt for the plucky tars who had faced 
the Pacific in their pleasure boats. Among those who ran down 
to see the white wings fleet at Santa Cruz was John Borden, 
who has just brought his yacht around the Horn, en route for 
Alaskan waters to hunt whales. Borden is naturally quite a 
hero to the local smart set, who realize that he is facing big 
chances in going into the Far Northern waters. With him will 
go our own Harry Scott, who occasionally has leaped into the 
front ranks as a bold viking. 

© © © 

It was the especial wish of young Horace Hill that no touch 
of gloom, due to the recent passing of his sweet little bride's 
father should be reflected in the wedding ceremony, and cer- 
tainly the whole affair, despite its enforced simplicity, was 
marked with an air of happiness. Mindful of the young 
groom's wish, no one appeared in black, and the beautifully 
decorated rooms at the Fairmont formed a background for a 
very brightly clad large group of friends and relatives. 

The chic little bride made an effective picture in her hand- 
some white gown, as did her attendants, Mrs. J. Cheever Cow- 
din, Miss Louise Boyd and Miss Marion Zeile. By the way, 
Marion Zeile claims a record as bridesmaid at smart societv 
weddings, nor does she seem in the least disturbed by the an- 
cient superstition, having crossed the three times' mark a sea- 



BLACK & WHITE 



SGOTGH WHISKY 



The Highest Standard of Quality 



ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front St., San Francisco 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



son or more ago. Attending the groom were Charles Nordhoff 
as best man, and Stanford Gwin, Roger Bocqueraz, Will Brig- 
ham and Sammy Hopkins as ushers. 

e © e 

The Wellington Gregg ladies are not to desert us this sum- 
mer for Europe. Mrs., Gregg has wearied of housekeeping, and 
has given up her beautiful apartment at the St. Regis and 
moved to the Fairmont. It has been her habit to take her two 
pretty daughters to Paris each mid-year and bring them back 
with trunkfuls of pretty things for the winter season. But 
Enid and Ethel's chums avow they've clothes enough for two 
seasons, with style enough for a longer time ahead. 
© © © 

The news that Mrs. Dan Murphy has sent back from her 
Continental trip an Arabian "Gazelle hound," has quite ex- 
cited society's dog fanciers. "Rashig" now awaits in New York 
his owner's return. . He is the first of his kind to land off Ellis 
Island. Just what kind that is, no one seems sure, but down 
at Hillsborough they're betting he's a beauty, or Mrs. Dan 
wouldn't have wanted him. While Rashig is getting accli- 
mated in America, the Murphys, with the Henry Foster Dut- 
tons, are motoring around the Continent. But Mrs. Dan ex- 
pects to introduce her new pet personally to her home friends 
by the end of September. 

© © © 

It was bound to come ! For a year or more' we have been 
hearing of the "Futurist" decorations in London homes. Now 
we shall probably soon see it used in some of our San Fran- 
cisco mansions. One of our local firms of decorators is show- 
ing some of the brilliant, many-figured draperies, which are 
intended to be hung on black walls. Paul Poiret, in his new 
venture into the field of house adornment, has used the black 
background with flamboyant hangings successfully, as have 
several British interior artists. The effect is very poster-like. 
But many wise dames feel that the riotous colors against the 
sombre walls put so much life into an empty room that it ban- 
ishes the need of a human presence. 
© © 9 

Jennie Blair and Mrs. Fred Sharon have acquired the lovely 
lithesome lines which each is displaying 'neath the draperies 
of the latest edict from Paris. Neither the aforetime plump 
Miss Jennie, nor the formerly rounded Mrs. Sharon ever was 
unpleasantly stout. But now they are both delightfully lissome 
and willowy. "Walks in the early morning, before breakfast! 
That's the whole recipe," confided Mrs. Sharon to a coterie of 
inquiring friends at the Palace tea-table. "No one need have 
a pound more than she wants, if she will just walk." "Woe is 
me," sighed one decidedly corpulent, though youthful matron, 
"I never in the world can get up the energy." "Vanity's the 
whip that should drive you," admonished an interested friend. 

Have you noticed how, these days, the r eally stout woman 
has vanished? One isn't stout any more. Just a little thought 
and a little self-denial seems to make it possible for the erst- 
while most corpulent to join the ranks of the tango-twirlers! 



ALAMEDA BATHING BEACHES. 
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thence by electric line to Fifth street station. Surf and Sunny 
Cove Beaches. See agents Southern Pacific. 

[ (AdTertisemeot) 



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European Plan 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

THIRTEENTH AND HARRISON STREETS. Oakland, California 
Absolutely fireproof Class A construction. Erected 
at a cost of $2,000,000. Perfect service and un- 

surpassed cuisine. Afternoon tea from 4 until 

6 o'clock. Music. 

European plan only Tariff $1,50 per day up 

Under Management of VICTOR REITER 
Electric Bus Meets All Trains 




Scientific Treatment 
SCALP 
FACIAL 

MANICURING 
166 GEARY ST. 



Phone Douglas 977 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUTLER-NELKE 
ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ART 

Alcazar Theatre Building: 

MIRIAM NELKE - Director 

Dramatic Art, Elocution, Dialect, Literature, French, 

Fencing, Dancing and Make-up. Fall term begins Aug. 11th 



CASTLE CRAGS 



Under same management as Hotel Del Monte. 

On main Oregon automobile highway and S. P. R. R. 

In the yellow pine forests of the Upper Sacramento River. 

Wonderful summer climate; bright warm days and coolnights. 

Beautiful trails through the shady forests for pedestrians or 

riding parties. 
Plenty of gentle horses and good guides. 
Automobiles for hire. 



The motor ride through 20,000 acres of virgin yellow pine 
forests is unequaled in California. 

Arrange your motor trips so as to stop over at CASTLE 
CRAGS for a day or two. Garage for automobiles; 
gasoline and oils. 

Rates: $18 to $24 per week. 

For beautifully illustrated folder and reservations, address, 
MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS, CALIFORNIA. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 




SOCBttrHEKSOHSL ITEMS 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

ARQNSON-LEHMANN.— Mrs. J. Aronson announces that the engage- 
ment reception of her daughter, Henrietta, to Mr. F. E. Lehmann, of 
Paris, will be held on Sunday, August 3d. from 3 to 6 o'clock, at the 
residence of her aunt, Mrs. J. Marks, in Larkin street. 

GOOMBS-GYLE.— The engagement of Miss Muriel Coombs and Mr. Jos. 
C. Gyle, of Corning, Cat., was announced Wednesday. 

DEMING-GEARY.— Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Deming of Santa Cruz announce 
the engagement of their daughter, Miss Dorothy Deming, to Mr. Er- 
nest G. Geary of this city. 

GLOOR-HILLKGAS.— The engagement of Dr. George Washington Hille- 
gas and Miss Emma Gloor was announced a few days ago. 

Mi cCHESNEY-ANDERSON. — The engagement of Miss Martha Mac- 
Chesney and Ensign Milton Anderson is announced. The marriage will 
probably take place this fall. 

McNEAR-HUTCHrNS". — As a bit of interesting news from London comes 
the announcement of the engagement of Miss Elizabeth McNear of 
Oakland to John Power Hutchins. 

PARR-SCHLINK.— The engagement of Miss Stella Parr and Mr. Thos. 
Sch link has been announced, and the wedding is to take place this 
month. 

READ-GRAF.— Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Graf announce the engagement of 
their son, Sidney Graf, to Miss Olive Read of Los Angeles. 

ROTHWELL-DUNCAN.— Mrs. Mary E. Rothwell, of this city, announces 
the engagement of her daughter, Miss Clara Adele Rothwell. to Gui- 
don Scott Duncan of San EranciSCO. The wedding will take place in 
the early part of August. 

TREACY-WESTDORF. — Within the week. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick W. 
Treacy have sent out cards announcing the betrothal of their daugh- 
ter. Lillian Elizabeth, to Mr. Vincent Hiram Westdorf. 

WOODMAN-BAXTER.— Mr. and Mrs. W. H Woodman, of First avenue, 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Kathryh Francis 
Woodman, to William A. Baxter, of London, England. The wedding 
is to tike place in the early part of October. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

FITZGIBBON-HEGER.— Miss Geraldine Fitzgibbon and Mr. Ralph Heger 
have decided upon September 16th as the date for their wedding. 
The ceremony will take plate at St. Mary's Cathedral in Van Ness 
avenue, with a reception at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Fitz- 
gibbon afterwards. 

FLOWER-KINZIE. — The engagement of Miss Marguerite Flower and 
Mr. Julian Kinzie came simultaneously with news that the wedding 
is to take place on a day in August to be decided later on. Miss 
FloA'er is the daughter of Mrs. V. L. Flower, and a niece of the late 
Governor Flower of New York. 

LEVEY-MacGREGOR.— Miss Florence Levey and Campbell MacGregor 
will be married on August 2fith, the wedding date being announced 
with the engagement a few days ago. 

WEDDINGS. 

BLOCH- HEI N ME R.— Samuel and Charles Bloch announce the marriage 
of their sister, Hedwig. to Mr. Jacob Heinmer, which took place Mon- 
day, July 21st, at G p. m., at Oakwood Hall. Devisadero street. 

BRINDLING-WENGBR. — The wedding of Miss Elizabeth May Brindling 
and Frank Joseph Wenger took place at the Stai of the Sea Church 
Monday evening, July 14th, at S o'clock. 

BROWN- STEWART. — The wedding of Miss Gertrude Lewys Brown and 
Mr. J. Everett Stewart took place on Thursday, July 17th, at high 
noon, at the home of the bride in Guerrero street. 

CAMP-BIDDLE. — The marriag >' Miss Ellamae Goodale Camp of Hono- 
lulu and San Francisco, and Mr. William Biddl^ Shepard of Phila- 
■ i. .r i,ia, toot place In London on June 21st. 

DAVIS -DURDEY. — Mrs. F. Davis announces the marriage of her daugh- 
ter, Selena, to Alfred R. Durdey on July 3d. 

i- IXON-HEISE. — A simph wedding took place last Wednesday afternoon 

at Grace Pro-Cathedral, when Miss Julia Dixon be came the bride 

of Roy Heise. Thi ueremon; ■■■■■. as performed at four o'clock. 
GIBERSON-WINTERS.— A quiet wedding celebrated in this city Tuesday 

morning last was that of Miss Agnes Giberson and Verne Winters, of 

Spokane, Wash., which was solemnized in the home of the bride's 

parents. Dr. and Mrs. N. S. Giberson, in Union street. 
JACOBS-CHARLES. — Mr3. Ray M. Jacobs and Mi. Max Charles were 

married quietly at noon Tuesday, July 15th, by the Rev. Dr. Nieto. 

Only the immediate family were present. 
L.ODER-KN1GHT.— Miss Evelyn Loder and Mr. Frederick William Knight 

were married in Trinity Church, Oakland, Thursday evening, July 

17th. Rev, CHftOll Macon # officiated. 
MAXATON-YOLNG. — Miss Genevieve Catherin Manaton and Mr. Robert 

William Young were married on Thursday at the church of St. 

Thomas Aquinas in Palo Alto, where the Manaton family has resided 

for several decade's. 
McrvOR-NEWELL..— Mrs. Mary Polk de Bose of Los Angeles announces 

the marriage of her daughter, Jessie Mclvor, to Mr. Daniel E. Newell 

of this city, the wedding having taken place on the loth of the 

month. 



RPPENHKIMER-GOLDING.— In the presence of then immediate families 

and 'lose relatives, the marriage of Miss Jerline Oppenheimer and 
i , .. i£ celebrated last Tuesday afternoon in the Filbert 

I home "f the bride's sister. Mrs. G. Hugo Lyons. Rabbi Kaplan 

officiating. 
PARTRIDGE -CANNON. — The marriage Of Mrs. Rae Partridge and Mr. 
lam vi Cannon, :i well-known attorney of this city, took place 

on July 15th at the urldi s former home in Sacramento. 
ROSENBERG-EDWARDS.- V nuiet marriage celebrated during the last 

,,,.,[, ig thai of Mis.- Eva Rosenberg and Meyer A. Kdwards. 
SCHL \TT.--i.]ViXG.sT"N.— Cards have been issued announcing the 

marriage of Mrs. Amelia Schlatt and Allen Livingston, which was 

quietly celebrated in Sacramento July 15th. 
SELBY-HAYDEN. — The marriage of Miss Mary Selby and Mr. Curtiss 

Crane Hayden took place on Saturday afternoon at Grace Church, 

with Dean Gresnam officiating in the presence of the members «»r the 

two families only. 
SILVERSTEIN-KLETZ. — Mrs. F. SHversteln of Oakland aim ice* th) 

marriage of her daught< i Saydi <•• Charles KletZ, Sunday afternoon, 

July 20th. 

TILLOTSON-YOUNGBERG. — Miss Alice Pearl Tillotson bea the 

bride of J. J. Youngherg on July 16th. The ceremony was conducted 

by the Rev. Father Stark ot si Mi 

LUNCHEONS. 
BAIN.— Twelve guests enjoyed tin- hospitality of Mrs. Frederick Bain 

at the Country Club recently, when she entertained at an .-lab. .rate 

luncheon. 
CARFAGNI.— A novel luncheon was enjoyed by the guests of Miss Jennie 

Carfagnl last Saturday afternoon, who entertained in her home In 

Marin County. 
DANIELS.— In compliment to Mrs. Joseph us Daniels, wife of the s. ■<■(-.■- 

tary of the Navy, Mrs. Phoebe Hearst entertained at an elaborate 

luncheon in her charming v*lla at Pleasanton on Friday. 
FRIEDLANDER, — Miss Frances Frie Hand i b rtalned a congi nlal 

coterie of the youngei girls .it a luncheon which she gave Thursday 

afternoon in her home in Burlingame. 
RILEY. — Mrs. W. v. Rilej entertained at s ■ Wednesday 

home in Steiner street. 
SADLER. — Mrs. Charles M, Sadler was hostess at a bridge lunch 

cently at her home in Alameda, entertaining twenty-four of her 

friends, over half the number being from this side. 

DINNERS. 

BREYFOGLE. — Dr. and Mrs. Win, Breyfogle, who have been spending the 

summer in San Jose, were dinner hosts in the Hotel Vend n 

cently, when they entertained a dozen guests, 

i llAMBERLIN.— Mr. and Mrs. VViilard Chamberlin were hosts at a din- 
ner party at their home in San Mateo recently, and Mrs. Chambi rlin 
also entertained at a pretty luncheon. 

FINCKARD. — Mr. and Mrs. George Monroe Pinckard entertain..! ;ii a din- 
ner at their home in San Rafael on Tuesday evening last in com- 
pliment to Loyal Sewall of Bath, Me., who Is visiting his aunt, Mis. 
Norman MacLaren. 

SPRECKELS. — Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Sprerkels were hosts, at a dinner 
party recently at the Hotel de Crillon. in Paris. Mrs I i. 
Peralta Dargie, who is spending the summer in Paris, was also 
hostess at a dinner, both being elaborate affairs, 

WOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin Wood entertained at a dinner and theatre 
party last Thursday evening in compliment to John Borden, who, 
with Harry Scott and a congenial party of friends, will leave next 
week in his yacht, the Adventuress, for a cruise in Arctic waters. 

PARTIES. 

DAVID.— A masquerade surprise party was given this week in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles David by A. Leslie Aron and Edgar Kl 

ENDICOTT. — Miss Lenore Endicote was hostess at a large part, 
at her home in Jackson street early in the week. The guest 
bered over fifty. At midnight an al fresco supper was served. 

RILEY.— The birthday p anniversary of Miss Charlotte McEwlng was 
made the occasion of a delightful party at which Miss Helen Riley 
was the hostess. The event toofc place last Sunday at the beautiful 
summer home of Miss Riley. 

CARDS. 
GTCHEVERRY. Mrs. M, n. Etcheverry was hostess at a bridge party 

yesterday in honor ol Dr Etcheverry's sister, Mrs. i., Bouvel <>t Ban 

l 'lego. 
1. ash, —Mrs. ii. W. Lash ■ tess Monday afternoon at a brldgi 

in her apartments at tin- Hotel Stewart. 

TEAS. 

BULL. — Commodore and Mrs. Janus Bull gave a delightful Open -air tea 

at their homi in Santa Bai i Sunday, July 20th, In honor of 

Mr. and Mrs. w. Fuller. Eastern visitors in the seaside town. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene i-ayne, Jentlsts. have returned 

practice at 14S Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66, Hour*: 9 to 4. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



DANCES. 

DOE. — Miss Margin irenlng ai 

her home In Montecito, in honoi ot Mr and tfi . Harrj Chiekerini 

and Miss Floren 

MOTORING. 
AXHIXANDER.— Mrs I tnder tored to Boyes Springs early in the 

wee] mled bj hei daughters, for a fortnight stay. 
DE B. ROSSI.— Mi I di B Rosi laughter, Harlta, are 

motoring through the southern part of the State as far as San Diego. 

HALL. — Chaffee Hall moaneii to N"ap;i So. la Springs un Friday afternoon 

to spend the week end as the guesl oi friends. 
KBLHAM. — Mr. and Mrs. George Kelliam and Master Bruce Kelham left 

recently with friends for an extensive motor trip in the northern part 

of the State. 
MAKT1N. — Miss Fannie Martin is touring Southern California by motor. 
McLEAN.— Mr, and Mrs. Neil A, McLean and their daughters, Anne and 

Mary, left recently for a motor trip through Lake County. 

ARRIVALS. 
BISHOP.— Mr. ami Mrs, Thomas P. I lishop and Thomas P. Bishop, Jr., 

have returned to this city after several weeks' pleasant stay at their 

ranch near Santa Barbara. 
BLAIR. — Miss Jennie Blair, who has been at Bartlett Springs for some 

time, returned last Sundaj , 
BRYANT. — Miss Mario Louise Bryant has returned to her residence in 

Broderick street after a week-end visit at the Maxwell home near 

Redwood City. 
BJORNSTAD.— Mrs. Alfred Bjornstad, wife of Captain Bjornstad, is 

here from Berlin, where the Captain was for the past few years 

military attache. 
CLARKE. — Rev. and Mrs. Webster Loring Clarke have returned to 

their home in Vallejo, after a visit at Benicia. 
DARLING. — Mrs. Clara Hastings Darling and her daughter, Mrs. Chas. 

E. Maud, arrived this week from Denver. 
DE GUIGNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Christian de Guigne and Mr. and Mrs. 

Thos. Driscoll have returned to their homes at San Mateo. 
DUNNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Peter Dunne and their two daughters and son 

have returned from Alaska. 
FILMER. — Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Kilmer and their •laughter. Miss Marion 

Filmer returned from Hawaii to their home in this city recently. 
FLEISHHACKER.— Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Fleishhacker, who have been 

abroad, have returned from their travels and an- at their home in 

Fair Oaks. 
fuller. —Mr. and Mrs. William p. Fuller, Jr., who have been guests 

of the elder Fullers in Nevada, have returned to their apartments at 

the Te Kiteroa. 
GALLAGHER,— Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Gallagher have arrived in Califor- 
nia, and aii 1 the miosis of Mrs. Gallagher's brother-in-law and sis- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas II. Williams at their country lodge "ii the 

McCloud River. 
HAAS". — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Haas have returned i<> San Francisco. 
HEWITT. Mr. and Mrs. i 'Ixwell i iewitt have returned From Castle 

Crags, where they passed the weeJ 
josselyn.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Josselyn have returned to theli 

Home In WoodBlde aftei .1 week's motor trip to the southern pari 

of the State, 
LEWIS.- Mr, and Mrs, John Lewis arrived Tuesdaj on the Wilhelmlna 

from Honolulu. 
MARTIN.— Mrs. Eleanor Martin returned this week after a visit of 

several days ai Stag's Leap In Napa County. 
MBLVIN. Judge Henrj Melvln re I £ iturdaj fro East, where 

he has be< ti foi thi p 
PATIGIAN, Mi and Mn Halg Patlglati Frederl 

and Frank Smith have recentij been motoring In the southern part 

of the State 
ta 1 .1 :< 1' 1 Mr hi. 1 Mrs. William H. Talbot , who have ' a In Seattle and 

tat thei 1 1 rived 1 >>■ I 

TUCKEH )&.i Fames Ellis Tuck - arrived this week from st . Helena, 

where she has been pa im ner months at tin- Bourn ranch. 

VAN WYCK. Miss Helen \ m Wyck has returned from b ■■ 

County, and Is 1 1 In domiciled In her Oakland home. 

VASSAl I i ■■■ 

wher d visit with Mrs. Phoebe Hearst. 

WHEKL3 tid Mrs. I*. 1.. Wheeler, Miss Pauline, Miss Catherine 

and Kl rh ha m W heelei ha ■■■ ■ ■ ome in Broads ■ 

WILSON. Mrs. Mountford 9 W In Bur- 

Ung-aiin aftei 1 unty. 

DEPARTURES. 
Idward 1 1. Borden and Miss Eugenie 1 >. Borden have left 
. 
i>a\is Mi nil Mis Norrla Davis and Mis. Harry Spencer nan 

■ and hum: OB t" the McCloud Country Club in 

Siskiyou County. 

I'l-: QJBDA. Mr. and Mrs. Franeise.. Ae OJeda and their daughters left 

this week for Long Beach. 

FLOOD Del Monte for the 

few weeks, 
G< lODF] Mr. and Mrs Hug 

ral weeks' 
McK ITT RICK ECtttridt and M 

nla, 

mtaln, 
e she will remain until the close of the season. 
-dun have gone to the high Sierras 
for ti or a month. 



Pears' 

Most soaps clog 
the skin pores by 
the fats and free 
alkali in their com- 
position. 

Pears' is quickly 
rinsed off, leaves 
the pores open and 
the skin soft and 



cool. 



Established in 1789. 



TALLANT.— Mrs. George Tallant and her daughter have gone to Santa 
Barbara, where they have taken a cottage, and will stay for the rest 
of the summer. 

WELCH. — Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Welch have gone to their ranch, "Big 
Trees," near Felton, where they will remain until September. 

WILLARD. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Willard have gone south for a sev- 
eral weeks' visit. 

ZEILB. — Miss Marian Zeile. who returned several days ago from Santa 
Barbara, has left for Menlo Park. 

INTIMATIONS. 

Aid »IS. — Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Addir are spending a portion of their 
honeymoon at Independence Lake. They will be at home in this city 
after August lot. 

RIGGS. — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Riggs, who were married In New York 
this summer, aro in Alaska, where Mr. Riggs is engaged in a Gov- 
ernment survey of vast Importance. 

BOARDMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Danforth Boardman are at Del Monte visit- 
ing the former's mother, Mrs. S. C. Boardman. 

COLEMAN. — Mrs. James V. Coleman and her son are among those who 
have vacated San Francisco for the seaside. 

CI ' LI .EN. — Miss Rene Cullen and Miss Nellie Johnson are spending 
the summer at Fallen Leaf Lake. 

i K* M 'KER. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker, who have been 
in Paris, are motoring in Southern France. 

GRAVES. — Mrs. Graves is leaving in September on a tour of the world. 

HAVENS. — Mrs. Wickham Havens, Mrs. George Wilhelm and Mrs. Robert 
Newell leave on July 29th for Honolulu, to be away for two months. 

IIKLLER. — Mrs. E. S. Heller and Mrs. M. Heller are at the Hellman 
Bummer home, "Pine Lodge," on the shore of Lake Tahoe. 

ilt'NTlNGTON. — Mrs. Mary A. Huntington leaves in August for New 
Fork, en route to Europe. 

I. ALLY. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Lally motored to Santa Cruz last 
Thursday, and spent the week-end at El Pajaro Springs. 

MAl'ZY, — Mrs. Bynm Muuzy and the Misses Marjorie and Alice Mauzy 
and Mrs. M. E. Hebb&rd, are spending the month at Tahoe Tavern. 

tfcNe&r, who has been in London and Paris. Is 
en route home. 

U..-Mr. ami Mrs. George Harry Mendell, Jr.. and Miss Louise 
Janin, who are spending the summer at their country place in New 
Hampshire, will return to their horre in this city next month. 

MURPHY.— Mr. and Mrs. Daniel T. Murphy, who departed early in June 
for a three months' sojourn, have arrived In New -York. 

NEW LANDS.— United States Senator and Mrs. Francis Newlands ar- 
rived on Saturday from their home In Washington for a visit of 
ral months in California, 

POLK.— Mr. and Mrs. Willis Polk, who have been \lsltlng Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Rose Vincent at Muckrose Abbey, in Ireland, are at present In 
London. 

Siss« iN T .— Mr. and Mrs. Everett Sisson have planned to spend the win- 
:; Berkeley 

BHARON.— Mr, and Mrs. Frederick Sharon, who are spending the week 
the Palace, are entertaining or being entertained every' evening. 

TKVIS-— Lloyd Tevis and Will Tevis. Jr., are spending several weeks at 
Tahoe. where they are occupying the T.evls home near Tallac. 

WEILL.— Raphael Weill will arrive shortly from New York and Paris, 
where he has been for the past six months. 

WINN.— Mlse Dora Winn will return to town the end of this week and 
. will join her grand nn-i 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Orpheum. — Gus Edwards, who is notable for the develop- 
ment of clever youngsters, will introduce next week at the Or- 
pheum his latest achievement, which he appropriately styles 
"The Kid Kabaret." It is one of the most pretentious of vau- 
deville offerings, and contains a cast of twenty juveniles with 
Eddie Cantor and Georgie Jessel at their head. It is a musical 
melange suggested by the present cabaret craze. All the prin- 
cipals sing, dance and impersonate in a clever and entertain- 
ing manner, and their efforts as comedians are quite up to the 
best adult standard. 

Miss Jane Connelly and her company invite you to join them 
in "A Strong Cup of Tea." a comedy of modern life by Erwin 
Connelly for those who have reached the age when a strong 
cup of tea does them a world of good. It will be served in the 
ornamental garden attached to the quaint little cottage where 
Betty makes her home, and Miss Connelly as Betty, Mr. Donald 
Fraser as "Billy," and Mr. Erwin Connelly as "Billy's" father, 
invite the audience to join them. 

A delightful quarter of an hour's diversion consisting of 
song, dance and story will be furnished by Fred Watson and 
Rena Santos. Mr. Watson and Miss Santos have been vaude- 
ville associates for a long time, and are always popular, owing 
to their ability and up-to-date methods. 

Brent Hayes, who is deservedly classed as a banjo virtuoso, 
will play selections without any accompanist, conveying to the 
audience the idea that they are listening to two or three in- 
struments. Mr. Hayes has achieved the difficult feat of having 
committed to memory one hundred and four selections, any 
of which he is prepared to play at instantaneous notice. 

Next week will be the third and most positively the last 
sf the engagement of Miss Irene Franklin, the American 
tomedienne, who is creating such an immense furore. She 
will sing entirely new songs. 

With this program, Pat Rooney and Marion Bent, Lamberti, 
and Miss Orford and her wonderful elephants, will close their 

engagements. 

• • • 

Fourth and Last Week of the Kinemacolor Season. — The 
fourth and final week of the Kinemacolor moving picture season 
at the Columbia Theatre bids fair to attract widespread atten- 
tion, for not only has the management, in making up its pro- 
gram, secured attractive features for those who find delight in 
the drama, in the scenic and in the travelogue, but they have 
placed on the bill one of the most marvelous educational fea- 
tures ever taken by the camera. This is the three reel subject 
entitled "Steam," and those who have given study to the in- 
ventions of Watt and Stephenson, will find the Kinemacolor 
presentation one of exceeding interest. The discovery of steam 
and the realization of its properties as a means of power, and 
the later discoveries and application of steam in the propelling 
of engines, proved a great stimulus in the matter of transporta- 
tion. A very fine patriotic special in three reels, "Nathan Hale," 
is on the program, as is also the old-time English morality play, 
"Everyman." "The Pearls of the Madonna," one of the most 
striking stories ever pictured on the screen, is also to be offered 
during the week in conjunction with other numbers, which are 
sure to help make up a two hour program of great interest and 
entertainment. Matinees are given daily at two-thirty. The 
evening performances are given at 8 :30. 

On Sunday afternoon, August 3d, San Francisco will see for 
the first time the eight-reel "Quo Vadis" production, which has 
been a big sensation for twenty weeks and is still running at the 
Astor Theatre, New York. It is a stupendous affair, which is 

proving the moving picture thriller on both sides of the Atlantic. 

* * * 

Tivoli Opera House. — With the matinee to-day and to-night 
will see the last two performances of the "Mikado." Beginning 
to-morrow night, the Tivoli will stage its fourth Gilbert & 
Sullivan revival, "The Pirates of Penzance." As usual, the 
original text will be followed, and under the able direction of 
Mr. Edward P. Temple, we may expect a fine production and 
performance. The cast will be in good hands: Teddy Webb 
will be the Major-General; Charles Gallagher the Pirate King; 
Henry Santrey, Samuel; John Phillips, Frederic; Robert Pit- 
kin, Sergeant of Police; Rena Vivienne, Mabel; and Sarah Ed- 
wards, Ruth. "The Pirates of Penzance" is in the brightest 
Gilbert & Sullivan strain. 



Frederic, when a boy, was to have been apprenticed to a 
pilot until his twenty-first year, but by the mistake of his nurse- 
maid, he was bound cut to one of the pirates of Penzance, who 
never molested orphans because they were orphans themselves. 
In the first scene Frederic has reached his majority and is 
about to leave them. Ruth requests him to marry her, and he 
consents; but shortly afterwards he meets the daughters of 
General Stanley, falls in love with Mabel, the youngest, and 
denounces Ruth as a deceiver. The second act opens in the 
General's ancient baronial hall. Frederic appears and bids 
Mabel farewell, as he is about to lead an expedition for the 
extermination of the pirates. The Pirate King then shows him 
the papers which bound him to them. He has yet some time 
to go, and he decides to stay with his old associates. Then he 
telfs them of the General's orphan story, and they swear ven- 
geance. They come by night to carry off the General, but are 
overpowered by the police, and confess they are English noble- 
men. Upon promising to give up their career they are par- 
doned, and this releases Frederic. 
* » * 

Alcazar Theatre. — "Miss Dot," the Alcazar's offering next 
Monday night and throughout the week, will be another well- 
fitting vehicle for Bessie Barriscale, Forrest Stanley, Howard 
Hickman and the regular company. Written by W. Somerset 
Maugham, the British playwright, it served Billie Burke as a 
starring medium during a season in New York and a year en 
tour, and this will be its first presentation at popular prices. 

Miss Barriscale's talents are admirably adapted to effective 
portrayal of the central figure in "Mrs. Dot." She has the role 
of the youthful, pretty and vivacious widow of an opulent 
London brewer, and when she finds that Gerald Halstone, a 
poor young fellow who has won her affections, is engaged to 
marry a girl unworthy of him, she neither mopes nor seeks dis- 
traction, but systematically plans to win him for herself. How 
she manages to succeed without conveying dissatisfaction to 
any one concerned makes delicious comedy. 

Mr. Stanley will be seen as Gerald, Mr. Hickman as the 
widow's cynical accomplice, Jerome Storm as the youth she 



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Fine for dance music. 

Sherman, Pay & Go. 

Steinway and Other Pianos Victor Talking Machines 

Pianola Player Pianos 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay St»., Oakland 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



utilizes to transfer Nellie's loyalty, Bert Wesner as Gerald's 
valet, Alice Patek as Nellie, Adele Belgarde as the mother, 
and Anna McNaughton as "Dot's" maiden aunt. There are 
three acts, the places being shown being Gerald's flat in Lon- 
don and "Dot's" villa on the Thames. 

* * * 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — The soloist for the Music Matinee 
to be given under the auspices of Kohler & Chase on Saturday 
afternoon, July 26th, will be Mrs. Richard Rees, soprano. 
This exceedingly accomplished artist is one of the most popu- 
lar appearing at these recitals, and her frequent a'ppearances 
are sufficient evidence of the esteem in which she is held by 
the management as well as the audiences. Mrs. Rees possesses 
a very charming soprano voice, which she employs with the 
utmost taste and artistic discrimination. The works chosen for 
Mrs. Rees' interpretation are especially suited to her fine 
sense of artistic proportions. 

There will be the usual number of interesting instrumental 
compositions to be interpreted on the Knabe Player Piano and 
on the Pipe Organ. 

* * * 

Pantages Theatre. — Fred Ardath and his dainty maids, who 
created the biggest laughing success that ever played the 
Pantages circuit, on their last visit here recently, will head the 
list of attractions opening at the Pantages Theatre on Sunday 
afternoon. Ardath will be seen in a new musical comedy 
called "A Night Out," which follows the regular routine of 
vaudeville farce playlets, but which gives Ardath a splendid 
opportunity for comical "horseplay." His dainty maids, num- 
bering twelve, with Muriel Arlington as the leader of the cho- 
rus numbers, will show a variety of new novelty song hits. The 
Olga Samaroff Musical Trio are the added attraction with the 
show. Miss Samaroff is a young Russian violinist with com- 
fidence and virile execution. Roy La Pearl, billed as "The 
Baritone Blacksmith," is the possessor of an unusually power- 
ful singing voice. La Pearl is known as "the man who sings 
above the clouds," and during his stay in this city will render 
selections from the top of the Pantages Theatre building. Will 
H. Armstrong is back in vaudeville with a merry little play 
called "The New Expressman." Armstrong is a real laugh- 
producer. Little Willie Hamilton, a tiny tyke from Los An- 
geles, will play a number of classical selections on the cornet. 
Howard and Dolores, known as the comedian and the ragtime 
model, have a dainty and catchy singing and dancing offering. 
A white clown and a dark one make up the Lester Brothers 
— eccentric and daring acrobats. 

• • • 

The Mission play of San Gabriel, California, which was pre- 
sented for 422 times at the little playhouse opposite the Mission 
St. Gabriel, is to make its first pilgrimage to the city of Mission 
Dolores and will be a great attraction at the Columbia Theatre 
late in August. Over 100 people will participate in the pageant 
drama of early California life, romance and mission building. 

• • • 

Margaret Anglin will arrive in the city in the near future and 
complete the details for her Greek Theatre production of 
"Electra," at the same time making arrangements for the open- 
ing of her new season at the Columbia Theatre. Miss Anglin 
is to make the new version of "Anthony and Cleopatra" the 
piece de resistance of her repertoire. 



Alcazar Theatre 



a ray 'J; 



"Future generations will think I am the President of the 

Ananias Club," the shade of General Sherman moodily re- 
marked. "What's the matter ?" asked Napoleon. "Why, Car- 
negie has abolished war and the theologians have abolished 
hell," replied Sherman. — Cincinnati Enauirer. 



If the morning's shopping has been delayed or some 

afternoon's coming engagement necessitates your staying down 
town, you cannot find a more delightful place to spend the 
luncheon hour than at the Tait-Zinkand Cafe. The harmonious 
surroundings and tasteful decorations make a most inviting 
resting place in pleasing contrast to the busy hum of the street. 
This cafe has long been noted for the uniqueness of its enter- 
tainments, each week's attraction vying with the one just pre- 
ceding in novelty and originality. The special luncheon served 
daily from 11:30 till 2 is a revelation in the purchasing power 

Of fifty CentS. (AdTertUemoit) 



Hondas' Evonlne.Julj 28, and Throughout the » 

BESSIE BARRISCALE 
FORREST STANLEY 
Howard Milkman and the Alcasai Company ni Blllie Burke 
i'«ssful Starring Vehicle 

"MRS. DOT" 
A Corned? by \v. Somerset Maugham, 

Prices — Nights, 26c. to |1; matinees, 26c. to 60c. Matinee Thura 
day. Saturday, Sunday. 



Columbia Theatre BSfjSs 



Geary and Mason Streets 
klin 150 
The Leading riayhouse 



I \ Greal 
Matinee 



Gottlob, Marx & Co.. Managers 

Banning SUNDAY MATINEE JULY '27. FOURTH ANl> LAST WEEB 

KINEMACOLOR PICTURES 
ALL STAR FEATURE WEEK. "NATHAN HALE." "STEAM 11 
Industrial Subject,) "EVERYMAN" and other notable subjects, 
Every Day at J. :!u— Evenings at 8:80. 
Prices, Matinees any seat 25c. Evening, Reserved 26c, 86c. and 50c. 
Sunday Matinee August 3— Direct from the Afitor Theatre, New York 
George Kleine's Eight Reel Production of "QUO VADIS." 

O'Farrell Street Bet, Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theater in America 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

SUPERLATIVE VAUDEVILLE 
GUS EDWARDS' "KID KABARET" v\'ith Eddie Cantor, Georgie JeSBel and 
a Kompany of 20 Klever Kid Komiks; JANE CONNELLY & COMPANY 
offer "A Strong Cup of Tea;" FRED WATSON & RENA SANTOS Vaude- 
ville Ideas in Songs and Dances; BRENT HAYES, An Artist on the Banjo: 
Last Week MISS ORFORD and her WONDERFUL ELEPHANTS; PAT 
ROONEY & MARION BENT; LAMBERTIi NEW ORPHEUM MOTION 
PICTURES Showing Current Events. Last Week The American Comedienne 
MISS IRENE FRANKLIN, With Mr. Burt Green at the Piano. Entirelj 
New Songs. 

Evening prices — 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c Box seats, $1. Matinee 
prices (except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 25c;, 50c 



Orpheum 



Pantages' Theatre 



Market Street opposite Mason 



Week Starting Sunday Matinee, July 27th 

ARDATH AND HIS DAINTY maids. 20 Staging and Dancing Comedians 

in "A NIGHT OUT;" OLGA SAMAKOKK TRIO, From Royal Conservatory. 

Moscow, Russia: WILL ARMSTRONG CO., "The Nen Expressman;" ROY 
LA PEARL. The Baritone Blacksmith: HOWARD and DOLORES, The Rag 
time Model Girl; LESTER BROTHERS, Clowning Comiqtiesi WILLIE 
HAMILTON. Wonderful Boy Cornetist. 

Matinee Daily at 2:30: Nights at 7:15 and 9:15. Sundays and Holidays 
Matinees at 1:30 and 3:30. Nights Continuous From 6:80. 



Tivoli Opera-House 



Phone Sutter 4200 



One Week Only, Starting Monday, July 28th, Gilbert and Sullivan's Beautiful 
Comic Opera 

"THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE" 

The Gilbert and Sullivan revivals at the Tivoli are the talk of the town, 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

POPULAR PRICES— 25c, 50c. and 75c, Box Seats $1.00 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 




Oriental Tavern 

105 l'i.weii-iiis Ellis Streets 

Most Unique Tavern in 
San Francisco 

Soft Chinese Music 

First Class American 
Dishes and Chop Suey. 

Mercantile Lunch for 
Shoppers. 

Chinese maids in attendance 

Every Friday afternoon a beau- 
tiful present will be given the 
lady holding the lucky number. 



MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

-Have you not always some slight repairs? Stopped 
basins, broken window cords, electrical repair work? 
We will assume all your repairs at a small monthly 
rate. Our representative will call at your request 

Phoenix Repair Company 

Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglas 822 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



IZAAK WALTON DAYS! 




Reddick Bickel fishing on the Van Duzen River. 

These are the days when the followers of the sport that Izaak 
Walton loved are having their greatest enjoyment. The State 
of California affords to the angler fishing of so many varieties 
that any one, from the most expert wielder of the rod and 
caster of the fly right down to the boy with the bent pin and 
the string tied to a bough, can find a place to enjoy himself. 
The streams of this part of the State are now in their best con- 
dition for fishing, and the rod-wielders are not overlooking 
the opportunity. 

From every point come reports of good sport. On the Klam- 
ath River, on the northern border of the State, with its numer- 
ous contiguous streams, the sport has been excellent. The Sac- 
ramento River is whipped daily by hundreds of anglers, and 
the McCloud, with its numerous private lodges and summer 
residences, is affording enjoyment to many. 

In the Big Meadows country and along the Truckee, on Lake 
Tahoe and the surrounding lakes, in the Feather River country, 
now made accessible by the Western Pacific Railroad, and in 
the numerous lakes that can be reached from this road, those 
who have gone there to spend their vacations are daily finding 
that their efforts with the rod and reel yield baskets of trout 
sufficient to satisfy their cravings for the gentle sport. 

Marin, Sonoma and Mendocino Counties are net-worked with 
good fishing streams. And to those who can reach the streams 
of Trinity, a rosy prospect is opened up by the accounts of suc- 
cessful fishing brought to town by parties who have made the 
trip by automobile. 

Reddick Bickel, a young angler of this city, accompanied 
by several friends, spent a couple of weeks :n the northern part 
of the State, and returned enthusiastic about the sport they had 
enjoyed. 

The Bickel party fished the Eel River, the Van Duzen, a 
branch of the Ed, the Mad River and the South Fork of the 
Trinity, and everywhere found plenty of fish. Besides the 
pleasures of angling, the party enjoyed a trip through scenery 
that made them firm believers in the watchword that has be- 
come so lately popular, "See your own country first." 
* * * 

America and England will meet in the challenge matches for 
the Davis Cup, the trophy that carries with it the tennis cham- 
pionship of the world. The matches are scheduled for the 
last week of this month on the Wimbledon courts in London, 
and followers of the game all over the world are eagerly await- 
ing the outcome. 

Most experts, including Anthony F. Wilding, who can claim 
to be the world's champion, are of the opinion that the repre- 
sentatives of the United States will emerge victorious from 
the fray. This country has in Maurice McLoughlin the man 
who ranks next to Wilding, and there are many who believe 
that the San Francisco boy is the equal of the famous New 
Zealander. Wilding defeated McLoughlin in the challenge 
match for the English championship, but it is pointed out that 
McLoughlin must have felt the effects of the strenuous play- 
ing he had to go through to win the all-comers' tournament, 



and that he was at a disadvantage in going against Wilding, 
who had only to prime himself for one match. 

In the matches against the Australian, German and Canadian 
players, McLoughlin and his team-mate in singles, R. Norris 
Williams, Have not lost a match. They are both young, Wil- 
liams being a Harvard student, while McLoughlin is barely 
past his majority, and they have outplayed their opponents, 
most of them experienced and seasoned players, not only with 
their hands and feet, but with their heads. 

McLoughlin and Harold H. Hackett are America's doubles 
team. They lost a match to the Australians in the first inter- 
national contest, but since then they have been universally suc- 
cessful, and they should continue their winning career against 
the English doubles combination, which is not considered to 
be their equal. 

McLoughlin went through the best of the English players 
in the championship tournament, and Williams won all his 
matches until he met his team-mate, McLoughlin, when he 
withdrew to save McLoughlin the wear and tear of a hard con- 
test. America's victory over Canada was an easy one. The 
third set was a long one, but the accounts of the match contain 
the surmise that the Americans were giving the spectators a 

run for their money. 

» » » 

Three other young tennis experts of this city are making 
names for themselves on distant courts. At Longwood in the 
East, William Johnston, a member of the Golden Gate Park 
Tennis Club, is making a fine showing in the tournament that 
brings together more good tennis players than any other in 
this country, with the exception of the national champjonship. 
John Strachan and Clarence Griffin, the Pacific Coast cham- 
pions in doubles, are playing fine tennis in the national clay 
court championship at Omaha. These boys are also develop- 
ments of the public courts in Golden Gate Park, and they are 
on their way to Chicago, where they will meet the winners of 
the Western, Eastern and Southern doubles titles, in a tourna- 
ment to decide which team will play the national champions. 
The holders of the title of United States doubles champions 
are also Californians, Maurice McLoughlin and Tom Bundy, of 

Los Angeles, having won the title last year. 
» * » 

The San Francisco baseball club broke all records during 
the past two weeks when it slid from a position within one game 
of the lead to the bottom of the heap. The Seals took only 
one game out of the seven from Sacramento on the local lots, 
and then went to Portland and lost the entire series of six games 
to the advancing Beavers. Naturally the fans are keenly dis- 
appointed, and the management is scurrying around for players 
to bolster up the team before it gets so far down that the stern 
chase will be too hard. 

The race in the Coast League is the best in the country at 
present, the margin between the first and last club being less 
than between the first and second clubs in some of the leagues. 
Every team has a chance, and the interest in the struggle for 
the pennant is waxing daily. 

An outfielder named Schaeller has been secured by San 
Francisco, and Manager Howard believes he has a second 
Jimmy Johnston in the new man. It is to be hoped that Howard 
is right. San Francisco can stand a few more Johnstons. The 
speedy center fielder of the Seals has afforded the spectators 
at Coast League games more thrills by his speedy base-run- 
ning than any one man in the circuit. 
* « * 

Miss Alice Warner, of Del Monte, just failed to duplicate 
her performance of last year when she won the Potlatch Gold 
Championship on the links of the Seattle Country Club. Miss 
Warner reached the final and lost the match at the last hole. 
Roger D. Lapham, of Los Angeles, who was in the final match 
of the men's championship at the same tournament, was also 
a loser, so that to the Californians it was a case of "so near 
and yet so far." As if to bring some consolation to the visiting 
players, Percy W. Selby, the Burlingame golfer, who is the 
official handicapper, president and general Pooh-Bah of the 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



California Golf Association, was the winner in the defeated 
flight. 

* * * 

The annual yacht race, from San Francisco to Santa Cruz, 
promoted by the Corinthian Yacht Club, was sailed last Satur- 
day. Light winds spoiled the race as a contest, but the ama- 
teur sailors who made the trip enjoyed the session on the 
ocean. The yachts started at 4 :30 in the morning, and the only 
one to reach Santa Cruz the same day was the Olga, a yawl 
that can hardly get out of her own way in the bay. Such 
speedy yachts as the Yankee, Nixie, Thistle and Marian 
drifted into the seaside city the following morning. 



REAL ESTATE BARGAINS. 



NEW FOREST REGULATIONS. 

To give settlers and other local users a larger voice in 
National forest administration, Secretary of Agriculture Hous- 
ton has just promulgated a new regulation which goes into effect 
at once, providing a means by which the forest service may 
systematically co-operate with duly organized" associations of 
such users. Any association whose members include a major- 
ity of the local residents making use of the National forests 
may get together and select a committee to meet with the local 
forest officers. This committee will be recognized in an ad- 
visory capacity in settling questions which may arise between 
the forest service and the public in the use of the forests. 

The exact wording of the regulation is : "Wherever any asso- 
ciation whose membership includes a majority of the local resi- 
dents using a National forest, or portion thereof, for like pur- 
poses, shall select a committee, an agreement on the part of 
which shall be binding upon the association, such committee, 
upon application to the District Forester, may be recognized in 
an advisory capacity on behalf of the association, and shall be 
entitled to receive notice of proposed action and have an op- 
portunity to be heard by the local forest officer in reference to 
any proposed changes likely to materially affect the use or in- 
terest in the forest or portion thereof enjoyed by such permit- 
tees. The general principles of recognition and responsi- 
bility governing cooperation with live stock associations are 
herewith extended, so far as they are applicable to the other 
regular lines of business conducted on the National forests." 

The object of this regulation is to extend what may be called 
home 'participation in National forest management. It is 
recognized that the best use of the forests in the interests of 
the general welfare means the promotion of local welfare, and 
that the forests must be handled with careful consideration 
for all local interests involved. It is recognized also that pub- 
lic confidence in the spirit of fairness with which individual 
citizens are treated is essential, and that local participation 
in the settlement of many questions is the best possible safe- 
guard against arbitrary or unwise decisions by local forest 
officers. 



"You are getting very bald, sir," said the barber. "You, 

yourself," retorted the customer, "are not free from a number 
of defects that I could mention if I cared to become personal." 
— Louisville Courier-Journal. 



STOCK RANCH 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 1,500 acres 
12 miles from San Jose, two miles from a station, on the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. About 300 acres tillable land, 
200 acres of which is mostly level, and has been sown to 
wheat, producing enormous crops. The balance is rolling 
hills, with a small piece of rough land covered with natu- 
ral grasses, affording abundance of feed during the sum- 
mer months. A creek runs through the property, and 
numerous springs give plenty of water for cattle. 
Improvements are old, but with small expenditure could 
be put in first-class condition. The place has been used 
as a stock ranch, and turned off 250 head of horses and 
beef cattle a year, and if properly equipped, would make 
a good dairy or hog ranch, being close to the railroad and 
markets. About 200 acres would be suitable for orchard. 
Price $27.50 per acre, one-half cash, balance easy terms. 

Address OWNER, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. ]. ]. 
Phillips, 12 Geary St., San Francisco. 



FINEST DAIRY FARM IN CALI- 
FORNIA, NINETY MILES 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



ACREAGE 

750 acres (survey shows 787.5 acres), all deep river bot- 
tom sediment soil, less than two miles from a first-class 
shipping point on the Southern Pacific Railroad, within 90 
miles of San Francisco, and 9 miles south of Stockton. 
350 acres are in alfalfa, yielding six cuttings, balance in 
barley and pasture. 

IRRIGATION 

A pumping plant has been installed, equipped with a 

10-inch centrifugal pump, 18 inch steel intake pipe, taking 

water from the San Joaquin River, 40 horsepower electric 

motor, capacity 3,500 gallons per minute. 

A large canal runs through the property, and smaller 

ditches are being completed for irrigation. 

When the balance of the land is prepared, it will be 

seeded to alfalfa. The place will then carry 600 head of 

milch cows, young stock and hogs. 

IMPROVE MENTS 

Fine modern electric lighted dwelling. 
Spacious farm-house. 

New ice plant for cooling milk and refrigeration. 
Cow barn, accommodating 400 head of cows at one milk- 
ing, with storage capacity for 800 tons of hay. 
Two new silos, concrete foundations, of 1,500 tons 
capacity. 

Several small barns. 
Blacksmith shop and outhouses. 

Tank house and tank, 42,000 gallons, operated by elec- 
tricity. 

Large weighing scales. 
All necessary implements. ' 

STOCK 

350 head of fine y.oung milch cows. 
25 head of work-horses. 
5 thoroughbred bulls. 

500 tons of alfalfa and barley hay in the stack. 
At the present time, 750 gallons of milk are being shipped 
daily, with a milking of 250 head. We are in a position 
to contract for all the milk produced at 15 cents per gal- 
lon, F. O. B. railroad station. 

REMARKS 

The place, with only one-half of the acreage under culti- 
vation, is paying over 12 per cent net, and when fully de- 
veloped, at a small expense, will more than double the 
present net income. This is the best acreage investment 
in California, having many natural advantages, cheap 
shipping rate to Stockton and San Francisco, free water 
for irrigation from the San Joaquin River, cheap electric 
light and power, most productive soil, and ideal climatic 
conditions. 

TERMS 

Price, $200,000. $60,000 cash, balance in four equal an- 
nual installments, with interest at 6 per cent. The profits 
of the ranch should take care of the deferred payments 
and development. 

address, HEDLEY HALL, 

21 SUTTER ST., S. F. 

J. J. PHILLIPS, 12 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 





UHNANCIAU 




The Co-Operative 
Bank Project. 



According to the plan formulated 
by Howard L. Mack of the banking 
house of Byrne & McDonald, the 
farmers and ranchers of the State of California will no longer 
be required to pay from 8 to as high as 12 per cent for the 
needful money to finance legitimate business. 

Mack's plans, which were announced in the daily newspapers 
this week, are for the formation of a State-wide farmers' co- 
operative bank, which will mean that the California rancher in 
the aggregate will actually finance his own pecuniary needs, 
backed by a strong central institution, possessed of $2,500,000 
of actually subscribed and paid-up capital, and with an au- 
thorized capital of $10,000,000. Early next week the incor- 
porators will meet, comprising representatives of some of the 
largest commercial houses in the city. Speaking of the pro- 
ject, Mr. Mack says: 

"It is our intention to employ horticultural and other agri- 
cultural experts, attaching them to the permanent staff of the 
central bank. Thus when an association of apricot growers, 
let us say, desires to form a district organization for mutual, 
co-operative, banking purposes, we shall be in a position to • 
despatch to them a man thoroughly conversant with their 
specialized business, to advise and aid them. A buying and 
selling agency, under specialists in these fields of endeavor, 
may also be developed in course of time as a component part 
of the central bank. 

"The real need of such an institution as we are forming, 
State-wide in its scope as we propose it shall be, lies in the 
fact that it is practically impossible for a small, struggling 
farmer to borrow anywhere in California $50, although he 
knows well and can demonstrate that by the use of this money 
he can make $75 a year. The existing banks in the rural dis- 
tricts offer no facilities *o such as he. No country bank could 
afford to lend this man that $50. The business would be too 
small to bother with, and their answer to such an applicant 
would be that his little loan would not pay for the bookkeeping 
involved in recording it." 



At time of writing, the general tone 
Conditions in in Wall street appears to be one of 

Wall Street. hesitancy, while nevertheless the 

market remains fairly strong. Re- 
ports received by local financial concerns seem to indicate the 
general strength of the undertone and a higher range of prices. 

Well known railroad issues remained consistently strong 
throughout the first half of the week, while government bonds 
were affected by renewed weakness. The report of the Re- 
public Iron & Steel did considerable to encourage confidence 
in industrial shares, and the copper market can be said to be 
improving generally, with an increase in domestic buying. 

Advices from New York point to a greater ease in money 
conditions and increased activity. 



The rise of the securities of the 
Benefits of Western Pacific Railway on the San 

Reorganization. Francisco Stock and Bond Ex- 

change continues to be a main item 
of encouragement. The members of the local Exchange claim 
that general confidence in Benjamin Franklin Bush, the new 
head of the company, is the cause of the improvement in price 
of the company's securities. 

It is generally conceded that Mr. Bush will be able to place 
his road on a substantial financial and income basis. The gains 
have been marked, and the advance from the low record of 
$74 on the sale of 5 per cent bonds on June 12th last to $81.50 
on Tuesday, this week, is remarkable and a tribute to Mr. Bush. 
The day after on which the announcement was made that Mr. 
Bush would assume the reorganization of the company, an ad- 
vance of $1 was immediately recorded, and the rise has been 
steady ever since. 



Union Oil Dividend. 



On Tuesday this week the report 
that the Union Oil Company will 
hereafter pay dividends semi-annu- 
ally instead of monthlv, was confirmed by telegraphic com- 
munication to local brokers. It is the intention, moreover, to 
pay the dividends out of the actual earnings. 

Concerning this decision of the Union Oil Company, the 
William K. Staats Company issued a statement which says 
in part: "A change from monthly to semi-annual dividends by 
the Union Oil Company should ultimately result in profit to the 
stockholders, as the cost of handling and mailing monthly divi- 
dends to approximately 5,000 stockholders has been con- 
siderable." 



Do you know that delightful scent known as Parfum 

Mary Garden? It is, perhaps, the most popular perfume of the 
day, and is used by thousands of. ladies whose educated taste 
demands a scent that is sweet and subtle, a mere suggestion of 
odor rathet than a too pronounced perfumery. Souvenir bot- 
tles of Parfum Mary Garden are presented to lady patrons 
of Techau Tavern, and are among the best appreciated of 
the marly attractive little gifts with which the management ex- 
presses its appreciation of their patronage. Everything about 
the Tavern is of a character which appeals to lovers of refined 
environment, and, even during the mid-afternoon hours, when 
restaurants are usually deserted, this cafe is well filled with 
ladies seeking rest and refreshment during shopping hours. 

(Advertisement) 



CALIFORNIA RODEO AT SALINAS 

July 28th to August 3. 

Don't miss the Big Week. Rough Riding, Broncho Busting, 

Daring Feats of the Range. Carnival of Sport. Reduced Round 

Trip Rates via Southern Pacific from all stations in California 

and Nevada. Sale dates, July 26th to August 3d. Return 

limit, August 4th. l&dYerttoanent) 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



Main Office 
HILLS BUILDING 

SiB Francuco, Cilifornie 



Exchange 
chime 
do 
Exchange, Sao Fraocue* 



Breach Officii 



Loi Angeles San Diego 
Coroaado Beach Portland, Or*. 
Seattle. Waih Vancouver. B. C. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Established 1858 

SUTRO & CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Retard to Any Security 
Will be Furniehed Upon Request 

Membere — The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



EXCHANGE 840 ACRES 

In Yuba County, located about seven miles east of the 
town of Marysville, four miles from the main line of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. This land is all level, has all 
been under cultivation, and is fenced and cross-fenced. 

The soil is of a reddish loam, uniform and deep. All 
valley land — would be desirable for most all kinds of 
fruits, including citrus or would grow alfalfa by de- 
veloping the water. 

2 wells on the place at the present time. Water stands 
within 20 feet of the surface. 

This property would make a splendid subdivision which 
would sell from $125.00 to $150.00 per acre in small tracts. 

Will exchange for Bay property and assume mortgage. 
Price, $55,000; mortgage $16,000. 

Address HEDLEY HALL, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



SOCIAL NOTES FROM CASTLE CRAGS. 

Eighteen covers were laid for the dinner dance that was 
given Saturday evening at Castle Crags. The Misses Treat, 
who left for Berkeley, were the complimented guests. After 
dinner, dancing was enjoyed in the Assembly Hall. Amont: 
those present were the Misses Ysabel Chase, Treat, Campbell. 
Callahan, Booth, Lee. Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt, Mr. and 
Mrs. Smitten, Mrs. Martin, Messrs. Cuyler Lee, Jr., H. Wright, 
Richard Lee and Horace Chase, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wall and daughter, Rosell'e, arrived 
at Castle Crags Friday. The former is a sugar planter of 
Honolulu. 

Judge and Mrs. J. A. Cooper, of San Francisco, are stopping 
at Castle Crags. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rolph, the Misses Elizabeth and Doro- 
thy Rolph, of San Francisco, motored to Castle Crags this 
week. The former is a brother of Mayor Rolph. 

Miss E. Garretson and Mr. and Mrs. C. Kclley have joined 
the Alamedans at Castle Crags. 

Mrs. E. D. Donovan, a prominent clubwoman of San Fran- 
cisco, is a guest at Castle Crags. 

The Horace Blanchard Chases celebrated their wedding an- 
niversary on Friday last at Castle Crags. The circular table 
was laid on the east veranda. The favors for the dinner car- 
ried out the nuptial idea. 

The George Rolphs and Arthur Duncans entertained several 
of their friends with an auto trip to the McCloud River last 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Peterson, well known society folk of 
Los Angeles, are summering at Castle Crags. 

Mrs. B. F. Woolner and Miss G. Gibson, of Oakland, ar- 
rived at Castle Crags Sunday. 

The Misses Patterson and Lyford, two well known society 
girls of Los Angeles, are summering at Castle Crags. 

Mr. W. E. Ford, of Oakland, is spending his vacation at 
Castle Crags. 

The Misses Ysabel Chase, M. Treat, G. Booth, J. Campbell, 
A. Treat, Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt, Cuyler Lee, Jr., H. 
Wright, R. Lee and Horace Chase, Jr., enjoyed a picnic to 
Squaw Creek Tuesday. The trip was made on horseback. 



day evening they invited several of their friends to accompany 
ihem in their machine, which had been decorated with lanterns 
to take part in the parade preceding the "Feast of Lanterns" 
at Pacific Grove. 



SOCIETY NOTES FROM HOTEL DEL MONTE 

The past week at Del Monte has been an unusually lively 
one for the guests at the hotel, for in addition to the amuse- 
ments and many forms of recreation indulged in there was the 
"Feast of the Lanterns" at Pacific Grove on Saturday evening. 
Preceding this was the Presidio of Monterey Field Day Events 
in the afternoon. Friday evening Sidney F. Hoben gave his 
dramatic reading of Massenet's "Thais" with incidental music 
upon the piano. Mr. Hoben is a noted pianist, having studied 
in Leipsic and toured extensively in concert work. 

During the week there were many dinner parties at the Lodge, 
picnic parties to the Rancho Del Monte and to the many 
beaches on the Peninsula. The golf links were thronged morn- 
ing and afternoon, many having come down to prepare for the 
big event in the fall. 

A jolly motor party arriving at Del Monte on Sunday for a 
few days consisted of Mrs. John Barton, Mrs. Barton Cuyler, 
Miss Grace Cuyler, Master Cuyler and Mrs. Alice Barton 
Ferrington. 

C. S. Stanton of the San Francisco Examiner joined his wife 
and daughter at Del Monte on Friday after an absence of three 
or four days in San Francisco on business. 

Miss Anna D. Peters entertained a jolly lot of young folks 
from Stockton and Fresno at a Spanish dinner at Monterey on 
Saturday evening, they having come over to attend the "Feast 
of Lanterns" at Pacific Grove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Prossi and Miss Marita Prossi of Menlo Park 
were at Del Monte several days last week, having motored 
down. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Neuhaus, the artist, were visiting friends at 
Del Monte and Monterev several days last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Holiday. Dr. and Mrs. F. W. Sawyer 
of Paso Robles are still at Del Monte, the past week has been 
a busy one with them, they having a picnic one day at Rancho 
Del Monte, and another out on the drive, and part of the time 
has been spent on the golf links or at the bath house. Satur- 



PACIF1C GROVE HOTEL NOTES. 

The "Feast of Lanterns" on Saturday night was a decided 
success : the long, serpentine row of automobiles, so beautifully 
decorated with lanterns and electric lights, was a wonder to 
every one who saw it. The car of Barley Landon was awarded 
the first prize for being the "Best Decorated Car" in the parade, 
by the three judges, as the cars passed in review in front of 
Hotel Del Monte. 

The Sacramento contingent has arrived, and there are now at 
the hotel the Van Voorhies, Hoens, Stephensons, Adams, Heil- 
brons, Chipmans, Southworths, La Rues, Charleys, Hatfields, 
Mrs. A. A. T. Merkley and the Quintons, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. 
Slocum, A. H. Hurd, and more to follow.next week. The man- 
agement will tend the Sacramento people the usual Sacramento 
dinner the coming week. 

Service people here during the week were Colonel Robert H. 
Noble, of the General Staff, who has general supervision over 
the new School of Instruction just located here. The Colonel 
was accompanied by his niece, Miss Schultze, of Washington, 
D. C. 

Major Nance, on duty at the School of Instruction, and Mrs. 
Nance had a dinner party of eight on Saturday night, staying 
over for the hop after dinner. The party included Majflr Hall, 
the Commandant, and Mrs. Hall. 

The Saturday night hops are becoming very popular with the 
guests, and also with the town people and the army people. 
Last Saturday night at least two hundred were on the floor when 
the orchestra started "Home, Sweet Home" at midnight. The 
exceptionally fine music is a feature, and is as alluring to the 
elders and more sedate as to the younger element. 



SANTA CRUZ NOTES. 



Mrs. Henry T. Scott, Mrs. R. J. Russell, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Cadwalader and Miss Mills motored t:> Santa Cruz and stopped 
over at Casa del Rey to enjoy the week-end festivities. 

Mr. Albert Bettens came down from San Jose to take part 
in the inter-city golf match between the San Jose players and 
those at Santa Cruz. Some of the players from San Jose in- 
cluded Mr. H. V. Seggerman, G. T. Tompkins, E. G. Singletary, 
George Singletary, H. J. Lion, Percival Carey, F. A. Schneider 
and E. K. Johnstone. 

Reverend Doctor Frederick W. Clampett, pastor of Trinity 
Church in San Francisco, has been at Casa Del Rey for the 
past week. Dr. Clampett is a great believer in out-door exer- 
cise, and to-day, although over fifty years old, can take the 
measure of most any swimmer in the State when it comes to 
any distance over a half mile. He is also a golfer of no mean 
ability, and plays at least eighteen holes a day on the beauti- 
ful Casa del Rey links. 

The drives around Santa Cruz are probably the greatest asset 
the town has, and for that reason there never is a day that 
passes but what Casa del Rey is favored by Eastern tourists. 
Mrs. Walter Browne and her daughter, who are touring Cali- 
fornia, has registered at Casa del Rey, and intends seeing the 
Big Trees, and drive through San Lorenzo Canyon. Mrs. 
Browne is the wife of the noted playwright of New York who 
wrote and produced "Everywoman." 



A man entered a drug store in a hurry and asked for a 

dozen two-grain quinine pills. "Shall I put 'em in a box, sir?" 
the clerk asked as he counted them out. "Sure," replied the 
customer. "Do you think I'm going to roll them home?" — Ex. 



TO YOSEMITE IN A NIGHT. 
Don't Miss It. 
Pullman sleeping car via Southern Pacific. Leave ferry sta- 
tion 9:40 p. m.; Oakland, Sixteenth street station, 10:17 p. m., 
arriving El Portal 7 a. m. Round trip from San Francisco, in- 
cluding stage between Hotel Del Portal and Sentinel Hotel, in 
center of the park, 14 miles, $22.35. Stage thence to Wawona 
(Mariposa Big Trees), 25 miles, and return, $15 Comfortable 
camps in addition to first-class hotels. (Adicnismait) 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 




M0M0BILE 






BY BURLEIGH DAVISON. 

San Francisco Ready to Welcome Indlanans 

When the touring Indiana Automobile Manufacturers arrive 
in San Franicsco next Sunday, they will find that their wel- 
come will be as sincere as local motorists and the public gen- 
erally can make it. The long, adventurous trip from Indian- 
apolis has set a new mark for automobile tourists, and opened 
a new field for transcontinental traveling that will be of tre- 
mendous benefit to the whole country. 

While the primary object of the Indiana tourists in making 
this tour is to select a route for the proposed Lincoln Highway 
— a transcontinental road that will bind the East and the West 
in closer bonds of social and commercial kinship — still, there 
were other aims that actuated the participants in this first cross- 
continent tour. 

That the tour has aroused unusual interest throughout the 
country goes without saying, for never in the history of 
motor car touring has there been as important an undertaking 
from all angles as this. 

What the results of the tourists' findings will be remains to 
be seen, but one thing is certain, and that is this : they will 
gather an invaluable fund of first-hand knowledge of the coun- 
try through which the proposed highway will run that will aid 
the promoters of this project to make a wise decision on the 
final routing of the transcontinental highway. 

From other standpoints, the tour of the Hoosiers' factory 
men will mean a great deal to local automobile dealers, as it 
will give them a chance to meet personally some of the biggest 
men in the motor car world to-day. From this meeting there 
should spring a better understanding between the dealer and 
the maker, and a deeper appreciation of the aims and objects 
that each in their different fields is trying to attain. 

Let it be said that San Francisco gave the visitors the best 
time that they experienced along the route, and thus keep up 
our reputation of free-handed generosity. Welcome to the 
Indiana Automobile Manufacturers to our Golden City. 



Vast Sums for Lincoln Highway 

One of the most progressive signs of the present era in mod- 
ern civilization is the work being done by States and nations 
towards improving the roads within their respective territories. 
Within the next two years, in six Western States alone, there 
will be available or expended over $40,000,000 for good roads. 
Most of this money will be spent on links of roads that will 
connect with the Lincoln Highway and form a system of com- 
prehensive State roads that will be a delight to every user, 
whether they drive motor cars or horseflesh. 

The States of California, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, 
Utah and Nevada have taken up the good roads work in earnest 
and will expend vast sums annually on stretches of county high- 
ways within their lines that will add to the wealth and attrac- 
tiveness of the West as a residential territory immensely. 

California alone is furnishing $18,000,000 for two good roads 
running north and south, to say nothing from Oregon to the 
Mexican line, besides the road from San Francisco to Lake 
Tahoe, which will pass through Sacramento and connect at 
the Nevada State line with the National highway running east. 

The next State with a goodly sum for highway extension is 
Colorado, which has created a highway commission to expend 
$1,000,000 yearly in good road work. The commission ex- 
pects to put in 395 miles of road to add to the 4,500 miles of 
fair roads already in existence. 

The work of connecting up the roads in Utah and Nevada 
is being handled by the legislature, while Arizona and New 
Mexico have organized z highway commission to promote the 
work of road improvement and extension. 



San Mateo Good Roads Bonds 

The action of the Parrott family and Antoine Borel, the 

banker, in offering to purchase to the extent of $50,000 and 

$35,000 respectively the San Mateo good roads bonds, is a 

gratifying example, and one that should awaken the civic 

pride of the residents of that beautiful county. 

If San Mateo can place her issue of $1,250,000 bonds for 

the improvement of her highways, with her own citizens, she 

will be doing a dual good work by having her citizens spend 

their money on their own communities, and at the same time 

show the world that they have unlimited faith in the future of 

the county. 

'As San Mateo is essentially a residential county, and to a 

great extent a place of fine country homes and drives, it is 

necessary that her roads be of the best in every respect, if 

she would keep her present residents and secure new ones, as 

nothing is so attractive to would-be suburbanites as good 

highways, the present movement to acquire them is in every 

way worthy of the united efforts of all good citizens of that 

county. Let us hope that San Mateo will soon be gridironed 

by a system of magnificent roads, the result of the progressive 

work of her citizens. 

* * * 

"Motorcycle Leaping" New Sport 

The average American enjoys excitement, and is enthusi- 
astic over any sport that is sensational. A new sport now in 
vogue is called "motorcycle leaping." Automobile polo may 
be all right, but it hasn't anything on this. This new sport was 
originated by Mr. Oakley Weibel, an employee of the Good- 
year Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio, and was ex- 
ploited by him on a country road just outside the city of Akron, 
Ohio. Motorcycle leaping can be accomplished best on a road 
with a fairly steep grade, broken by short rises known as 
water breaks. These water breaks are found on the side of a 
hill or slight incline, and are for the purpose of diverting the 
course of the water to the side of the road. 

A moderately fast speed is necessary, the faster the speed 
the farther the leap. By coming down a grade at a fast clip 
and jumping his machine with his knees, when the water break 



Across The Country 
COAL OIL 



on 



IN A 




3500 Miles— Averaging 18 miles to the Gallon 

Cost of Fuel Cut In Half 

This 1914 Henderson Car ran from In- 
diana to California on "Coal Oil," at an aver- 
age cost of 9 cents for 18 miles. Total cost 
of fuel consumption $17.50 for 3500 miles. 

On Display Monday and Tuesday only 

car leaves for Los Angeles on Wednesday. 

The New 1914 Henderson 
equipped with wire wheels. Ready for im- 
mediate delivery. 

BONNHEIM- MOORE MOTOR CAR CO. 

1325 VAN NESS AVENUE 

C. R. ALLEN - 2070 Broadway - Oakland 



July 26. 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



is reached, the motorcycle and its rider clear the top with such 
momentum that quite a distance is covered before the machine 
touches the ground. Recent trials have resulted in leaps o£ 
from 20 to 24 feet, and at a maximum height of 18 inches. One 
trial for height resulted in a leap of 18 feet at a height of 24 
inches. 

* * * 

Henderson Car Runs 3,600 Miles on Kerosene 

The Hendersons of Indianapolis have just finished a trip of 
3,500 miles with a Henderson car from Indianapolis to San 
Francisco burning coal oil. The facts about the use of kero- 
sene in connection with an automobile are now well-defined, 
and after over a year of careful testing, the Hendersons have 
adopted the most up to date device for the use of kerosene 
as a fuel oil for an automobile. The average mileage ob- 
tained on this trip is 18 miles per gallon. The advantages of 
using kerosene over gasoline are well known, and have been 
for a number of years. Coal oil makes more volatile combus- 
tion, more of the heat units generated are used as power when 
coal oil is used instead of gasoline. The motor is kept in a 
much better condition, and is more free from carbon deposits, 
the kerosene having a tendency to remove the carbon from 
the motor and not allowing it to accumulate. Besides, it is 
much safer to handle, and used in connection with an automo- 
bile, it will just cut the cost of fuel consumption in half. This 
Henderson car has been tested under all road conditions, 
weather conditions, and particular attention has been paid to 
the effect of higher altitudes. In leaving Denver to go to 
Hot Sulphur Springs, it is necessary to cross the continental 
divide of the Rocky Mountains, and this road leads over what 
is known as Berthud Pass. This pass is 9,500 feet above 
sea level, and Mr. Harroun drove the Henderson car over this 
pass without making any adjustment on the carburetor. Many 
motorists in California have noticed that the altitude com- 
mences to affect the carburetor using gasoline after a height of 
4,500 feet has been passed. 

It has also been definitely determined that kerosene gives 
a car more power. The Hendersons have been able to main- 
tain a speed of 75 miles an hour on the Indianapolis Speed- 
way with the use of kerosene, and this additional power is 
very advantageous in mud and sandy countries. Of course, 
the Hendersons expect a good deal of criticism which will 
probably be offered by many who are not familiar with the 
circumstances. The Bonnheim-Moore Company, distributors 
of the Henderson car in San Francisco are of the opinion, 
however, that the wise ones will be quick to take advantage 
of the economy which they are bound to get the benefit of by 
the use of kerosene on the 1914 Henderson machines. 



ing recently erected on this site, and when installed in its 
new quarters will have one of the finest motor car sales rooms 
and service stations on the Row. The Stevens-Duryea factory 
branch occupies the corner salesrooms, on Post and Van Ness 
avenue, and is under the management of A. W. Barber. 

• • • 

Lozler Fours Favorably Received 

Before the sale campaign for the season had started, over 
1,500 of the new four-cylinder Loziers had been contracted for 
by dealers in different parts of the country. This revival of 
active business reminded old time automobile dealers of the 
days when cars sold themselves, and when an advertising cam- 
paign was hardly a part of the selling end of the business. 

"We are more than pleased with the result of our first entry 
in the popular priced market," says Paul Smith, sales manager 
of the Lozier Company. "The fact that this is the first Lozier 
to be offered at a price less than $3,250 has evidently played its 
part in the surprisingly large orders we have received from 
New York, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia. 

"The returns from Lozier dealers who have had years of 
experience in handling fours and sixes should also prove of 
interest to those claiming that the cheaper type of six selling 
in the neighborhood of $2,000 will be predominant in 1914. 

* * * 

Mr. Haynes Popular on Tour 

Some years back, in 1894, to be exact, in the early dawn of 
the Fourth of July, the slumbering citizens of Kokomo, In- 
diana, were aroused by an ear-splitting racket along Main 
street. Believing it to ' be some new atrocious method for 
commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, or possibly an explosion of a trainload of fireworks, they 
dashed to their windows, only to behold one Elwood Haynes, 
a hitherto peaceful member of the community, complacently 
seated in what was dubbed a "horseless carriage," biff-bang- 
ing along over their protesting pavements. Probably if El- 
wood Haynes had anticipated what his trip in 1913 from Indi- 
ana to the Pacific Coast was to bring him, being a naturally 
quiet and modest man, he would have hesitated sending off his 
gasoline fireworks on that memorable Fourth in Kokomo, and 
thereby setting into motion the wheels of an industry no less 
than that of the great automobile. But as it is, his fame as 
the inventor, designer and builder of the Haynes, America's 
first car, has preceded him in his travels with the Haynes en- 
tries on the I. A. M. A. tour to the Western coast, and at every 
turn or cross-roads he is beset by an interested group, while in 
the cities his car is surrounded. As one observer remarked, 
"Hobsorj had nothing on Haynes." 



A. Sax Patents Carbon Deposit Cleaner 

As all automobile and motorcycle owners know — or, for that 
matter, any gas engine owner — one of the greatest evils they 
have to contend with is the removing of "carbon deposits" 
that collect in their engines and working parts, and always will 
as long as they use anything combustible, as anything that 
will burn is carbonaceous. So far nothing has been offered that 
will correct this trouble, save in a partial way. Some owners 
use preparations containing acids that affect the parts, and still 
other materials that subject the engine and parts to extreme 
heat, causing a shrinkage when cooling off. A preparation 
has just been patented by A. Sax, of this city, who has been 
experimenting and testing for over a year, that apparently from 
all reports and tests, accomplishes perfect results quickly, 
thoroughly, and is non-injurious to the engine or working parts. 
We predict for it a wonderful success. A quart will clean a 
4-cylinder car, and by using a pint weekly, will insure freedom 
from carbon deposit troubles. It takes ten to fifteen minutes 
to clean any engine, feeding through the air intake of the car- 
buretor and the pressure cocks. It is simple to use, and consists 
of five powerful agencies, temporizing themselves so as to ac- 
complish the purpose, but non-injurious in any way. 

• • * 

Maxwell and Stevens-Duryea In New Homes 

Two prominent automobile concerns are new housed in the 
new structure on the corner of Geary and Van Ness avenue. 
They are the Maxwell Motor Company's local branch, and the 
Stevens-Duryea's local factory branch. The former company 
has the northern section of the palatial new automobile build- 



New Cole Official Is Well Known In Motor Circles 

John Guy Monihan, who has joined the Cole Motor Car 
Company, of Indianapolis, as associate director of sales and 
advertising, is one of the best known men in the automobile in- 
dustry. Aggressive, but conservative, his views have done 
much towards the progression that has marked the advance 
of success in the automobile industry. As father of the idea 
for the amateur driver ocean to ocean tour, he gained inter- 
national prominence. Although only with Cole for one week, 
his assistance on the standardized car propaganda, which will 
be announced to the public soon, has been valuable. 
• * * 

" Tango" Favors Rubber Industry 

"The Tango, also the Turkey Trot, Bunny Hug and other 
dances are one of the reasons for increasing the growth in 
popularity of rubber soled shoes," says Frank Carroll, mana- 
ger of the local branch of the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Com- 
pany, Akron, Ohio. 

"To put these dances on in the proper manner demands 
gracefulness. In order to obtain this, the equilibrium of the 
parties dancing must be very well balanced in order to obtain 
the full benefit that the dance demands. By this I mean that 
the pedal extremities must be handled with care and not be 
allowed to slip and slide to the extent that leather soled shoes 
allow. 

"The adhesive qualities of rubber prevent the slipping 
which makes shoes or slippers with this equipment more effi- 
cient for obtaining the desired gracefulness that these dances 
afford when properly danced." 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



Ju^y 26, 1913. 



American Underslung Comes Through with Flying Colors 

"The American Underslung Sixes came into Ellis without a 
splutter, though the day's run was over 180 miles of typical 
Kansas gumbo. The thermometer showed 112 degrees in the 
shade and nearly 125 in the sun all day, and at times the pace 
hit was 50 miles an hour. Hot winds added to the discomfort 
and hardship of the ride, but we came through with flying 
colors." 

The above telegram was received by the local distributers 
of the cars from E. I. Lewis, a newspaper man and the special 
representative of that car in the Indianapolis-Pacific Coast 
tour, when the Hoosier cavalcade reached Ellis, Kansas. The 
American Underslungs have been acting nobly thus far on the 
tour, though the trip is said to be proving an extremely trying 
one for the cars. The tourists indulged in considerable worry, 
before the start, because of the highways of Kansas. The soil 
in many sections of that State is particularly difficult of navi- 
gation in wet weather, and there were some doubts expressed 
as to the ability of all the cars to negotiate the famous gumbo. 



Ford Company Organizes a Bank 

To handle the tremendous financial business of the Ford 
Motor Company, a bank was organized in August, 1909, and to- 
day it is one of the most prosperous banking institutions in the 
country. It has no direct connection, of course, with the Ford 
Company, but James Couzens, general manager of the Ford 
Company, is president. Mr. Ford is a stockholder, and other 
people interested in the Ford Company have an interest in the 
bank. Its business is not confined to the Ford Company, as 
Highland Park, a suburb of Detroit, in which the Ford plant 
is located, has had a tremendous growth in the past few years, 
and is a live, prosperous city of between 40,000 and 50,000 
people. It is in reality a part of Detroit, adjoining that city 
and getting fire protection, water and lighting service from 
Detroit, although it has never been formally annexed. 

The bank is known as the Highland Park State Bank, and, 
according to its statement of June 24th, it has resources of 
$3,019,787.26, with deposits, both commercial and savings, of 
$2,710,365.13. The bank building conforms architecturally to 
the buildings of the Ford Company, and is situated across the 
street from the Ford plant. 



Not Easy to Sell Cars In Aden, Arabia 

Of the 45,000 people in Aden, probably 300 are Europeans, 
comprising in the most part English army officers, city offi- 
cials and merchants. Probably one-fourth of the Europeans 
have incomes large enough to permit the purchase of inex- 
pensive motor cars. 

There are 16 cars in Aden, of which 6 motor 'buses are prac- 
tically useless. There is one 3Vi> ton French motor truck. Only 
two of these cars are American, but one owner proposes to in- 
troduce 6 Paige cars as public vehicles, and has already ordered 
two. The people here formerly did not take to the low-priced 
American car, but of late have conceded its merits. 

All cars in Aden have been brought there since 1910, and 
many are second-hand. Only two or three are sold annually. 
Their use is largely restricted to about 20 miles of road in 
Aden, and this and the climatic conditions make it impossible 
to push the sale of cars with any degree of success. All cars 
sold in Aden, as far as known, have been handled by one or two 
agents there. 



"Trainload" Collins Sends Another Big Bulck Shipment 

"Trainload" Collins, general sales manager of the Buick 
Motor Company, has set a new record. He sent out a whole 
trainload of Buicks, 150 of them, all 31's, to the Pence Auto- 
mobile Company, at Minneapolis, June 27th, making a total of 
fourteen trainloads that have steamed out of the Flint yards 
during the 1913 season. This practically cleans up on every- 
thing until 1914 deliveries begin to come through. Buick ship- 
ments during the 1913 season totaled 30,000 cars, a figure which 
will be materially increased the coming year by the large out- 
put of commercial vehicles the Buick Motor Company intends 
building. 



Pathfinder's Local Agency Reorganized 

Announcement has just been made that the well known Path- 
finder car will be handled in the future in Northern California, 
Nevada and Hawaii by the Pathfinder Pacific Motor Sales 
Company, the new organization that will take over the local 
business of the former Pathfinder Company here. With this 
change, the new company passes into the hands of San Fran- 
ciscans, and there will be no connection between the Los An- 
geles branch and the San Francisco house. The new organi- 
zation's President, James H. Borland, a local financier; J. R. 
Pringle, Vice-President; J. M. Whited, Secretary-Treasurer and 
General Manager; and Barry Cool, Sales Manager. 

Extensive plans for broadening the field of the company's 
activities are under way, and the new management expects 
to place its cars in the forefront of Pacific Coast motor car 
representatives. 

The company will retain its present quarters on Geary street, 
near Van Ness avenue. It will also have its own houses in 
Fresno, Watsonville and Sacramento. It will establish service 
stations through all parts of the State, and also have a branch 
in the Hawaiian Islands and Reno. In addition to the Path- 
finder, the company expects to take on a truck and a light 
delivery and pleasure car, so they will have a complete line. 
The 1914 four-cylinder Pathfinders are due to arrive this week. 
The six-cylinder cars will be out August 1st. This will be the 
lowest overslung car built to-day, and having excess power. 

* * * 

Federal Truck Aids Fire Fighters 

When a call for help went out from the little towns across 
the bay, which narrowly escaped destruction by the great forest 
fire which raged throughout the Muir Woods district, the Young 
& Swain Baking Company, of San Francisco, offered imme- 
diate and valuable assistance by loading their Federal truck to 
its fullest capacity with bread, and sent it post haste to Corte 
Madera and Larkspur, where the welcome foodstuff was meted 
out to the hungry fire-fighters and soldiers. Through the cour- 
tesy of the Northwestern Pacific, the trucks were allowed right 
of way and free passage on the boats both going and coming. 

After the bread had been distributed, the faithful Federal, 
which had already done 15,000 miles of service, pitched into 
the work of rescue and relief, reloaded with more supplies, 
sped up the steep grades of the canyon over crushed rock and 
stone in charge of two men, who made it their business to watch 
for firefighters overcome by smoke, and there was not a few 
but what can give thanks to the sturdy little Federal which 
reached some of them in the nick of time. 

* * * 

Service Determines Truck Values 

"Service is a question of the very highest importance in de- 
termining automobile or truck values," says H. F. Noake, of 
the Kissel-Kar. 

"No matter how high class the car, or how apparently right 
its price, it is at least a doubtful value unless there is accessible 
service behind it. Before purchasing a car, buyers should 
find out just what is going to be done to simplify its care and 
keep the cost of its up-keep where it belongs. The acceptance 
of verbal promises is not good business, for, even assuming 
perfectly good faith, misunderstandings must occur. 

"Every buyer of a Kissel-Kar receives a written guarantee 
that is simple and specific, but more important still, is the phy- 
sical evidence of ample facilities to carry it out. No eva- 
sion or hedging is morally possible and the buyer can see with 
his own eyes just how well the Kissel branches are equipped to 
insure performance." 

* * * 

Studebaker's New Quarters on Van Ness Avenue 

The Studebaker Company of America has opened a factory 
branch sales department on Van Ness avenue and Post street 
in new Gasoline Row, and are now prepared to handle their 
popular cars from the center of the city's motor car business 
district. The new quarters of the Studebaker Company are 
large, light and airy, and in every way adapted for the purpose 
to which they are dedicated. In addition to the salesrooms, 
they are provided with service, storage and stock departments, 
and in fact with a complete plant for the effic'ent handling of 
their increasing business. 



July 26, 1913. and California Advertiser 

Awtaa&GMs I&©Eiisftiraftn®iiiis 



25 



New licenses were issued to the following purchasers of au- 
tomobiles in San Francisco and vicinity for the week ending 
July 19th. The number of automobile licenses authorized to 
date for the State of California is 111,250. 

NATHAN, MICHAEL W., 2305 M St., Sacramento Cole 

i'UMMINCS, EDWIN A.. 740 Clement St., S. F Buick 

1 1 ART, GEO. D., 49th and I Sts., S. F. American 

ANDERSON, H. E., Powell near Bay St., S. F Ford 

LOMAX, MRS. WALTER B., 182 Clayton St., S. F Rambler 

SHASTA WATER CO.. 6th and Brannan Sts., S. F Autocar 

Ct'RRYER, R. C, 827 Irving St., S. F . .Hupmobile 

HOLLAND, JOHN J., 17 California Ave., S. F Ford 

I .i IOMIS, L. C, 36 Bourbon Place, S. F Hupmobile 

MEAD, EARL, 2388 Fulton St., S. F Packard 

GOODALL, H. W., Pier 7, San Francisco Ford 

ANGLE, ANITA, 1480 Sutter St., S. F Ford 

YOUNG, SAMUEL, 268 Market St., S. F Ford 

UNION IRON WORKS, California and Battery Sts., S. F Buick 

METLAR. E. P., 1330 Taylor St., S. F Buick 

LINDGREN CO., Mtinadnock Bldg., S. F Buick 

JACOBS, S. R., 522 32d St., Oakland Michigan 

E. K. WOOD LUMBER CO.. Oakland Federal 

SYKES, DR. ALBERT E„ 6002 College Ave., Oakland Mitchell 

LESTER, J. N., 1763 San Pedro St., Berkeley Abbott 

FERGUSON. J. W., 2237 Atherton St., Berkeley Marion 

HIRST, SAMUEL, 1628 Walnut St.. Berkeley : Haynes 

CREAGH, DR. J. W„ 1217 Lincoln Ave., Alameda Overland 

MERKEL, GEORGE C, 182(1 Bay St., Alameda Ford 

RICHMOND, RALPH V., Haywards Ford 

HEGEMANN, DR. WERNER, 321 Ramona Ave., Piedmont Ford 

LORSEN, C„ Elk River Corners, Humboldt County Overland 

ACKERMAN, NEWTON, Eureka Overland 

MORGAN, JR., F. E'., 64 Walnut Ave.. Santa Cruz Stutz 

WHITMER, WM. A., box 12S, Palo Alto Overland 

BISHOP. HERBERT, Point Arena Ford 

KENDALL, ALFRED, Manchester, Mendocino County Ford 

DAVIDSON, JOHN T., 1036 N. Sutter St . Stockton Ford 

GRAY, DR. ALLEN E., I. O. O. F. Bldg., Marysville Studebaker 

HARRISON, HOWARD. Hernandez : Studebaker 

McFARLANE, J. F., R. F. D. No. 6, Fresno Ford 

SHAW, W. H., Sonora Maxwell 

PALMER, J. H., Petaluma Studebaker 

WOODHAMS, W. E., 460 N. 14th St.. San Jose Hupmobile 

WILLIAMS, IS. C„ Keyseyville Ford 

DAVID JACKS CORPORATION, Monterey Peerless 

BELLI, MRS. C, Sonora Ford 

MEYER, CHAS., Dixon Buick 

HEATH. W. P., Redding Buick 

WARE, E. A.. 26 S. American St.. Stockton Studebaker 

DALE, J. J., Jackson Reo 

BREMNER, O. B„ 1007 Ripley St., Santa Rosa Ford 

SUII, GEO.. Windsor Ford 

1 1ARBER, HENRY. Mariposa Detroiter 

LADUCBUR, JAMES. Merced Detroiter 

TAYLOR, L. C, Maxwell, Colusa County Studebaker 

BAKER, J. W., Hotel Clayton, Sacramento Chalmers 

zltmkeli.eh. WM.. 717 Devisadero St.. s. F Wlnton 

RODGLPH, CARRIE M., 1410 5th Ave, Oakland Columbus 

IIUDDLESTON. D. C, Rraw ley \\ 

M< (ORB, JR.. J. W., R. F. D. No. r,, Stockton Ford 

pierce, HUGH o.. Placervllle Krit 

farnswortii. MRS. s. M.. 2627 M St.. Saci nto Studebaker 

STMAS, I. w.. Latrobe Ford 

MEDLIN, w. (I., 1723 K St.. Sacramento : Ford 

Thomas. MARY B.. 847 Kingston St., Oakland Ha 

THOMPSON, WM, 1314 Eighth St.. Oakland Haynes' 

IIARTlNii, HERMAN, Grass \ ill Detro 

NILE. HERBERT Grass Valley Detroiter 

DEPT. OP ENGINEERING, Capitol Bide Sacramento Ford 

BRTTB, M„ 1816 N St.. Sacramento Columbus 

JOHNSOI- I Q 1501 icramento Broc 

WATSON, WM., Gait Everett 

DAVIS, HERMAN. 1014 K St., Sacramento Buick 

CHISHOLM, Mits. m i ' , ses :::,i si, Sacramento Ford 

FEDERAL TRANSFER .< DRAYING CO., S, 1" Federal 

KERN TRADING & Oil CO., 1076 Flood Bldg S F Ford 

LEVIN, SAM! EL. 5(1 Hayes St, s. F Stevens-Duryea 

SHADDE, WW Jones and Market Sts., s i' Ford 

FREDERICKS, \ R. Posl ind Stockton Sts., s. F Westcott 

STEINER, J. N. 1431 Wesl St. Oakland Ford 

i m PAUL, i";-- 18th SI . land Chalmers 

BLAIR. J. X.. ir.25 O St, Sacramento Mitchell 

STA1 W„ Grass Vallej Detroit 

TREGO, M W 828 Webster St.. Oakland '.Ford 

CAYTON, F., 1st and Brush sis. Oakland Garford 

u UTE. DANIEL M.. i"i« Merced St., Berkeley Premier 

BASNEY, P., 14i>4 Mulberry St, Alameda Ford 

PARKS, GEO., Haywards Ford 

MRY, MRS. L. T„ Haywards Ford 

WEST, H. D. 2020 E Si i Chalmers 

PARK, w. T., 617 Keokuk St. Petaluma Cartercar 

HI'.Al.Y, JESSE !■:.. Yountvllle American 



i box 211. Redwood City Stoddard-Dayton 

ItAINES, II.. 21" s. School St.. Lodl i i 

EN, i. Rei J Ford 

.has., Red niufl i 

CHAPPELL,, G, \. ■: y Pord 

TOPT, MARTIN !■;., R. P. D. No. 4, box IS. Fresno ! 

GOODWIN, J. \., 30 Tillman Ave., San Jose I 

\\ i hirers, OTTO, Petaluma Studebaker 

BOYD, N. G. K„ :II6 Market St.. S. F Ford 

CLAYTON, G. E„ Chico Ford 

HARRIS, L, D., Chico Ford 

DAVID, I,, ''hie, Ford 

RICHARDSON, MRS. C„ Chico Ford 

BLOSSOM, J. L.. '.Ml N. Monroe St.. Stockton National 

TUBBS, FLOYD L., Tulare Hupmobile 

NUNES, M. B., Concord Mitchell 

BELDEN, GEO. M„ 718 Mason St., S. F R-C-H 

COUCHOT, MAURICE C, 2133 Santa Clara Ave., Alameda ...Studebaker 

ZEH, CARL R.. 2222 Central Ave., Alameda Ford 

SMITH, M. F., Chico Garford 

BARRON, MISS EVELINE, Mayfleld Reo 

SMITH, HARLAN C, Point Arena Ford 

HOOPER, JAS. F., 1127 E. Main St., Stockton Overland 

MOSHER, P. W., Stockton Overland 

MAYER, JACOB. Stockton Overland 

OWEN, T. B., Minturn Ford 

STEPHENSON, W. E„ Selma Ford 

COLE, E. H„ R. F. D., No. 7, Fresno JJOrd 

NCUSSITOU, L., R. F. D. No. 3, box 45, Fowler Ford 

REGAN, J. E., 1033 J St., Fresno Ford 

PUCHESS, C, Mendota .' Ford 

HARP, W. H., 1420 1 St., Fresno Ford 

TONS, JOHN, Rainier Bottling Works, Stockton Federal 

CONNELLY, WALTER, Newcastle Ford 

PLAYTER, CHARLOTTE S., 312 Mountain Ave., Oakland Premier 

KELLY, GEO. F, 2725 Mission St., S. F Metz 

ROBERTS, COL. E. M., Bakersfield Oakland 

FORSYTH, D. H., Bakersfield Overland 

ANDERSON, LOUISE S. C, 801 L St., Bakersfield Overland 

THOMPSON, GEORGE, Redding Ford 

BUTTERWAY, GEO. M., Cottonwood, Shasta County Ford 

SAUNDERS, F. E., Proberta, Tehama County Buick 

LALOR, P., Omo Ranch, Eldorado County Modern 

WHITE; MRS. T. R., 1205 10th Ave.. S. F Studebaker 

BLIVEN, R. M., 2425 Buchanan St., S. F Ford 

TYSON, MISS IRENE, Lucerne Apts., S. F Velie 

CADWALLADER, R„ 240 Stockton St., S. F Velie 

RAAFE, F. O., 24 Noe St., S. F Ford 

HOLLINGSWORTH, MRS. PEGGY G.. Richelieu Hotel, S. F Ames 

BARRETT. MARK D., Manhattan Hotel, S. F Cole 

GASS. M. C, 110 Jessie St., S. F .Franklin 

WALLACE. PHILIP B., 1441 Larkin St., S. F Pope-Hartford 

S. F. PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hayes and Franklin Sts., S. F Metz 

IIYA.MS. SANFORD, 343 Sansome St., S. F Hupmobile 

MANGIN, A. E. C 5301 Broadway, Oakland Cartercar 

RAY VIEW WATER CO., 3327 Royal St., Oakland Federal 

BATTENHOUSE. F. W., 515 33d St., Oakland Stanley 

CARTER, ALICE A., SI Parkside Drive. Berkeley Woods 

I ANDIS, C. C Mb and Oleander St., Chico Ford 

ANDREWS, HARRY A., Tehama Cadllla' 

CHELGREN. ABEL, R. F. D. No. 1. box 125, Turlock Krit 

EBERHARD, RUDOLPH, S12 D St., Haywards Studebaker 

STENZEL. F., San Lorenzo American 

G. W„ Dixon Ford 

WILDERMAN. WM., Willows Stud. 

HARDER, A. F.. Germantown Ford 

LONGMEYER, EDWARD, Willows Buick 

SOETH, JOHN II., Willows Ford 

LTJMSDBN, D. A.. Tuolumne Overland 

VANDAME, M. J.. Mountain View Ford 

wilds. II. L.. Gilroy Ford 

CAMPBELL, A. D. 661 s. 6th St, San lose Overland 

BYRON, EDWARD H.. Lemoore Ford 

FRENCH, T. H„ Hollister Overland 

JARVIS BROS., Hollister Metz 

JARVIS, S. J., R. F. D., Gilroy Ov< 

BLACK, DR. lb 'WARD. '.27 University Ave., Palo Alto National 

BUTLER. F. M.. box 127. Petaluma ChS 

U'l'LFF, F. W. H.. Knights Landing Ford 

i i:r. J., Watsonvllle Ford 

AMADOR CENTRAL. R. R. CO.. Mattel] Hudson 

WHLTTHX. II. B„ Ochsuer Bldg.. Sacramento Reo 

WHITAKER. JAMES. Gait Chalmers 

LANG, MAMIE B.. Red Bluff Ford 

MORRISON, C. V.. 1400 Lake St., East Bakersfield Ford 

. fON, C. C. Bakersfield Ford 

BENJAMIN, JAS H., Red Bluff Ford 

McKTNS Auburn 

LAVEZZOLA, JOHN M.. Concord Ai 

16 36th St.. Oakland Cartercar 

PURITY ICE CREAM CO.. 366 Guerrero St.. S. F Kelly 

RUFF. I'.. 122 Front St.. S. F A] 

COBB, J. F.. 504 Merchants' Exch. Bios.-. 3. F. 
CRAVE! - First Natl. Bank Bldg.. S. F 

SHATTUCK, H. C. i&t W. Poplar St.. Stockton Ford 

JOHNSON, H. M. Campo 

BRAY. W H. 1427 Filbert St.. Oakland Overland 

LACY I. T.. St. Mark's Hotel. Oakland . Overland 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



UNITED STATES BRANCH STATEMENT OF THE CONDITIONS AND 
Affairs of the PALATINE INSURANCE CO., LTD., of London, Eng- 
land, on the 31st day of December, A. D. 1912, and for the year ending 
on that day. Published pursuant to the Provisions of Section 611 of 
the Political Code and compiled from the annual statement filed with 
the Insurance Commissioner of the State of California. . 

Assets. 
Cash Market Value of all Stocks and Bonds owned by Com- 
pany $2,624,540.00 

Cash in Banks 204,369.17 

Interest due and accrued 31,634.00 

Agents' Balances representing business written subsequent to 

October 1, 1912 390,033.37 

TOTAL ASSETS $3,250,576.54 

Liabilities. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid 24,238.00 

Losses in process of Adjustment or in Suspense 99,529.68 

Losses resisted, including expenses 23,683.00 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running 'one year or less, 

50 per cent 628,332.41 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running more than one year, 

pro rata 1,087,985.02 

Estimated Taxes hereafter payable based upon this year's 

business 35,061.62 

Commissions and Brokerage due or to become due 42,744.25 

Re-insurance Premiums and Return Premiums 48,045.46 

All other liab.lities 10,385.82 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $2,000,005.26 

Income. 

Net cash actually received for Fire premiums $1,814,547-26 

Received from interest and dividends on Bonds, Stocks, Loans, 

and from all other sources 119,794.42 

Gross profit on sale or maturity of Ledger Assets 2,493.01 

Received from Home Office 2,628.21 

TOTAL INCOME $1,939,462.90 

Expenditures. 

Net amount paid for Fire Losses $ 947,431.87 

Expenses of adjustment and settlement of losses 25.377.17 

Paid or allowed for Commission or Brokerage 413,274.93 

Paid for Salaries, Fees, and other charges for officers, 

clerks, etc 125,494.67 

Paid for State, National and Local taxes 50,720.91 

Gross decrease in book value of Ledger Assets 12,868.35 

Remitted to Home Office 410,205.24 

All other Expenditures 96,502.90 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $2,081,876.04 

Losses incurred during the year (FIRE) $956,513.12 

Risks and Premiums. 

Fire Risks Premiums 

Net amount of Risks written during the year. .$250,528,193 $2,756,044.07 
Net amount of Risks expired during the year... 224,583^881 2,546,959.16 

Net amount in force December 31, 1912 297,803,001 3,272.640.15 

A. H. WRAT, U. S. Manager. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of February, 1913. 

H. R. RAT, Notary Public. 

CO-PARTNERSHIP NOTICE. 
The undersigned, co-partners doing business in the City and County of 
Francisco, State of California, under the firm name and style of Charles 
Meinecke & Co., do hereby certify: 

That the names in full of all the members of such co-partnership and 
their places of residence, are as follows: 

EMIL P. MEINECKE, Trustee, University Club, San Francisco, Cal. 
HENRY KUNZ, 1720 San Antonio Avenue. Alameda, Cal. 

EMIL P. MEINECKE, Trustee. 
HENRY KUNZ. 
Dated this 1st day of July, A. D. 1913. 

State of California, 
County of Modoc — ss. 

On this 4th day of July in the year one thousand nine hundred and thir- 
teen A. D., before me, C, H. Dunlap, a Notary Public in and for said 
County, residing therein, duly commissioned and sworn, personally ap- 
peared EMIL P. MEINECKE. Trustee, personally known to me to be the 
person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowl- 
edged to me that he executed the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. 

(Seal) C. H. DUNLAP, 

Notary Public in and for the County of Modoc, State of California. 

State of California, 

City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

On this 1st day of July, in the year one thousand nine hundred and 
thirteen, before me, JAMES MASON, a Notary Public in and for said 
City and County, residing therein, duly commissioned and sworn, per- 
sonally appeared HENRY KUNZ, known to me to be the person de- 
scribed in, whose name is subscribed to. and who executed the within 
and annexed instrument, and he acknowledged to me that he executed the 
same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal, at my office, in the said City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, the day and year last above written. 

(Seal) JAMES MASON, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of 

California. 



HAMMOCKS OF ALL KINDS 

OUR SPECIAL CANVAS HAMMOCK 
THIS WEEK $1.25 EACH 

WEEKS - HOWE - EMERSON CO. 



51 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Blake, Moffitt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

Private Exchange Connecting 



Phone Sutter 2230 
Departments 



PACIFIC 

LIMITED 

New Transcontinental Train 

Southern Pacific— Union Pacific— Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 

Daily to Chicago 
in 69 Hours 



From Snn Francisco (Ferry Station) 10:20 a. m. 

From Oakland (Sixteenth St. Station) 10:58 a. m. 

Arrive Chicago (Union Station) 9:16 a. m. 

3d mornine 



Observation Car 

Ladies' Parlor-Library 

Writing Desk and Stationery 

Stock and News Reports 

Drawingrooms Compartments 

Sections and Berths 

Tourist Sleeping Car 

Dining Car 

All Classes of Tickets Honored 



Connecting at Chicago with Limited Trains 

of Eastern Lines Arriving New York fourth 

morning out of San Francisco 



Southern Pacific 



SAN FRANCISCO: Flood Building Palace Howl Ferry Slalion Phone Koarny 3160 
Third and Townsend Streets Station Phone Kearny 180 

U. P. R. R. 42 Powell Street Phone Sutter 2940 

C. M. & Si. P. Ry. 22 Powell Street Phone Sutter 3220 

OAKLAND: Thirteenth Street and Broadway Phone Oakland 162 

Sixteenth Street Statioi Phone Lakeside 1420 First Street Station Phone Oakland 7960 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



"OUR COUNTRY" 



(At the large annual banquet at Lucerne, Switzerland, July 
4, 1913, to celebrate the Independence of the United States, 
while the American Minister to Switzerland, Mr. H. S. Boutell, 
was in the chair, Mr. Louis Lombard of Trevano Castle, 
Lugano, and New York City responded as follows to the 
toast) : 



"OUR COUNTRY." 

"Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen — In 1877, one year 
after landing in America, I saw on the Pennsylvania railroad 
train after train of oil cars set on fire by strikers, and I wit- 
nessed much rioting. At that moment I feared the country just 
beginning to be mine was already coming to a bad end. It has 
thrived wondrously ever since. I did not know then that even 
prehistoric man had had his squabbles over the spoils of a hunt, 
and that labor disputes had occurred and shall probably recur at 
all epochs and places. 

"We lead the world in all experiments, and it looks to us for- 
experience. More than once have I heard from the lips of 
foreign statesmen: 'We are watching your country to learn 
what to do and what not to do in our own. We are learning at 
your expense.' 

"We are young, enthusiastic, fearless, and at times we speed 
upon unsafe ground; but it is thanks to these attributes of a 
healthy, hopeful, courageous youth that we generally succeed 
where the old and timid often fail. 

"The darkest days in our history only reflect the better the 
brilliancy of our horizon. Mighty struggles, even deep wounds 
— wounds which seemed fatal — have ever left us stronger and 
wiser. 

"No lasting good is gained without pain. Had our colonists 
lived in peace and plenty, would they have evolved the great 
United States? We should thank the red man for having 
thrust upon us the bitter art of war. Had England treated us 
generously, we would have remained an English province, and 
our manifold activities, pregnant with good for all mankind, 
could not have received so strong an impulse, so deep an in- 
spiration as under the free Stars and Stripes. Had not brother 
been pitted against brother in a civil war, slavery might still 
blot our name. And, this very day, were the means for dis- 
honest money-getting uncurbed and the just demands of labor 
unheeded, worse than panics and strikes would occur. 

Let us rejoice to-day. Exports beat their fabulous record. 
Our natural wealth, our inventiveness and public spirit con- 
tinue to bring forth limitless blessings. Our labor is all em- 
ployed at the best wages in the world's history, and our rail- 
ways' gross and net earnings are greater than ever. The 
nation's fortune will increase this year by ten billion dollars 
from our farms, and our factories will turn out twenty billion 
dollars of goods. 

"The Panama Canal is opening. We remain a peaceful 
nation of hard-workers; our wars with Mexico and Japan are 
already over at the sole cost of printer's ink. And the budget 
is not burdened with a big army, because no power, nor coali- 
tion of powers, would ever dream of permanently invading our 
soil. The advent of eternal peace may be remote; meanwhile, 
we are learning to arbitrate rather than have wars or strikes — 
conflicts usually costly to both sides. Our Constitution has en- 
dured, our Supreme Court holds the respect of the world, and 
we can rely, as in the past, upon the intelligence and fairness 
of the majority of our citizens; benevolent forces that keep us 
from going far astray while enabling us to progress, not alone 
for the benefit of our people, but also for the advancement of 
humanity." 



When a young fellow is sitting in the parlor with an 

ugly four-year-old kid clambering over his knees, jerking his 
necktie out of place, rumpling his shirt front, pulling his hair, 
kicking his shins, feeling in all his pockets for nickels, while 
the victim smiles like the cover of a comic valentine, you may 
safely say that that boy has a sister who is in a room not far 
away, and that the visitor does not come there just for the fun 
of playing with her brother. — Exchange. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL. Santa Rosa. — Cafe attached. Steaks, chickens. 
squabs, and shell Rsh to order. Moderate prices. 



/ \ 

« THE RICHEST PRODUCT OF THE BEST £ 






! 



i 



OF MARYLAND'S FAMOUS DISTILLERIES 

HUNTER 
BALTIMORE RYE % 

i 

THE AMERICAN GENTLEMAN'S WHISKEY S 



Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 



I 








^ 






Phonii 



Sutter 1672 
Horn* C 3970 
Home C 4781, Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 

C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner In the City with Wlnt, Si-oo. Banquet t)>]|i and Private 

Dining Roomi. Music Every Evening. 
362 deary Street San Francisco 



J. Berces 



C. Mailhebuiu 



C. Lalaone 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 
415-421 Bush St.. Sin Francisco (Above Kearny) Eicbania. Doualai 2411 



For a Good Dinner and the Latest Music go to 
JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Special 50c Luncheon and $1 Dinner With Music 
Served in Ladies' Grill as well as Main Dining Hall 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



REDWOOD MANUFACTURERS CO. 

Water, Oil, and Wine Tanks all 
sizes and dimensions made from 
the best quality of California 
Redwood. 

811 KOHL BUILDING 

San Francisco 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases. Pacific Building. 4th and Market streets. 




Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMF 
H PIASE. Preaidaeu 58°. 591. 593 Market St. 



The keel and 

atronfeet 
Garden Hole 

Guaranteed to 

aland 700 lbs 

Preaanfn 

TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

San Frasoaco 



28 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



THE 
MONKS' 
FAMOUS 
CORDIAL 



# 













HAS STOOD 

THE TEST 

OF AGES 

AND IS STILL 

THE FINEST 

CORDIAL EXTANT 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes. 

Batjer & Co., 46 Broadway, New York, N. T., 

Sole Agents for United States. 




Ocean Shore Railroad 

'"Reaches the Beaches" 



NEW SERVICE See N i:ZT For 

YOUR SUNDAY TRIP 



DEPOT 12TH AND MISSION STS. I. N. RANDALL. General Aiienl 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 

Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and inspect motors. 

Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



DDI IC U [TC 623 Sacramento Street, between 
DnUOn LO Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow WtVre. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY. 
Let us guide you In your selections. 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers In 
The Highest Class D A DT D For Office Stationery 

Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephont Kearny U6i Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Conoections With All Railroads 

Main Office: 62S-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




FIN U LA. 

Finula was my princess 

That dwelt by the Northern sea. 
Finula's raven tresses 

Hung down below her knee. 
And it's oh, for my dark-haired lady, 

The fairest among them all — 
For she sings no more at her window, 

Nor dances adown the hall. 

Finula was my princess. 

Proudly she wore her crown; 
And the tread of her passing footstep 

Was lighter than thistledown. 
And it's oh, for my lovely lady — 

For her little feet lie still; 
And she cometh no more to meet me 

When I ride up the Castle hill. 

Finula was my princess, 

She sang like the birds in May; 
And the sound of her blithesome laughter- 

Made music all the day. 
And it's oh, for my tender lady — 

For the blue of her eyes is dim ; 
And her hands are like carven lilies 

That lie at the river's brim. 

Finula was my princess. 

I loved her in years gone by, 
And I wooed her in early spring-time, 

In winter did she die. 
And it's oh, for my winsome lady — 

In her grave by the Northern sea — 
For she sleeps where the winds are calling, 

And the sea-wave tosses free. 

— D. K. Boileau. 



A SONG. 

What have you done with the dream I brought you 

Late last night, at the fall of the dew? 
Over the brink of the world I sought you, 

And never paused and came to you. 
A dream of goiden and purple feather — 
Let us follow its flight together. 

The fairest dream that ever spread 
In the moonlight, shining wings. 

It perched in the blossom overhead 
Of the apple-tree where my soul sings — 

Sings of you. It came, it came 
When through the dark no least star shone. 
I knew not if 'twas star, or bird, or flame, 
But stretched my hand out and it perched thereon. 

Sweet, sweet — ah, sweet! 
See how its pinions glisten! 

All love, all joy is in their beat 
And in its sultry pinions. Listen 

To its enchanting strain — 
Like sorrow turned to laughter, 

Like the sound of rain 
Falling in desert places, or 

Delight no weariness comes after, 
Long waited for, 

Which still renews itself again. 

— Margaret Sackville. 



Wedding Presents.— The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



(AdTcrtlscment) 



July 26. 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



29 




Inspector — Any abnormal children in your class. Miss 

Pedagog? School Teacher — Yes; one of them had good man- 
ners. — Life. 

"Is Dobbs a hard-working man?" "I guess you can call 

him that. Any kind of work seems hard to him." — Birmingham 
Age Herald. 

"It is said that more than one person has been killed by 

kissing." "Yes; but isn't it great stuff if you live through it?" 
— Exchange. 

Willie — Paw, what is the difference between genius and 

talent? Paw — Talent gets paid every Saturday, my son. — Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer. 

■ Aged Uncle — I've insured my life for five thousand dol- 
lars in your favor. What else can I do for you? Nephew — 
Nothing on earth, uncle. — Exchange. 

He and she arrived in the fifth inning. He (to a fan) — 

What's the score? Fan — Nothing to nothing. She — Goody! 
We haven't missed a thing. — Illinois Siren. 

'"You talk about men!" exclaimed, the suffragette. "What 

has man ever done for woman?" "He invented the ballot box," 
came timidly from the rear of the hall. — Ex. 

He — A penny for your thoughts, Miss Sterling — but I 

suppose you value them at more than that? She — Oh, no! 
The fact is, I was thinking of you.' — Yale Record. 

He — As I was saying, Miss Maymie, when I start out 

to-do a thing I stay on the job. I'm no quitter. She (with a 
weary yawn) — Don't I kpow it! — Baltimore American. 

Millyuns — When I married your mother I was earning 

ten dollars a week — two years later I bought out my employer. 
Daughter — And put in a cash register! — Town Topics. 

The directors of the high school at Dover, N. J., want 

somebody to teach the girls how to box. We don't know what 
the position pays, but our application goes forward to-morrow. 
— Exchange. 

— — -Bobby — Ma, you said that I shouldn't eat that piece of 
cake in the pantry — that it would make me sick. Mother — 
Yes, Bobby. Bobby (convincingly) — But, ma, it hasn't made 
me sick. — Puck. 

"My dear, I see you are having some clothes made for 

your poodle." "Yes; it is the latest fad." "Well, I serve notice 
right here that I don't button any dogs down the back." — 
Louisville Courier-Journal. 

How is it that a young man and girl will sit together for 

hours in the parlor without saying a word, and then, when it is 
time for him to go home, stand an hour talking in the hallway? 
They all are doing it. — St. Louis Humorist. 

Bobby — I think I like you better than any of the other 

fellows that come to see sister. Percy — I'm pleased to hear it, 
Bobby. Why do you like me the best? Bobby — Because sis 
always lets me stay around and hear what you say. — Judge. 

"My husband is one of the most stubborn men in the 

world." "He can't be any more stubborn than mine." "Oh, 
yes, I'm sure he must be. Yesterday I had an engagement to 
meet him at three o'clock." "Yes?" "Well, it was nearly 4:30 
when I got there, and he won't admit yet that the rest he got 
while he was waiting did him good." — Chicago Record-Herald. 

Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



(A.lTertiaement> 



Give your husband at home 
The beer he calls for 
In his Club 



Wleland's Brown Beer is a very 
popular beverage in San Francisco's 
'eading clubs. It's a very unusual 
brew — always appreciated by men 
familiar with the best imported beers. 

It will be just as popular in your own 
home as it is in your husband's club. 

Order a case today. You can't get it 
everywhere — the supply is limited. 
Telephone us your name and the name 
of your dealer and we will see that he 
delivers it to you. 



Brewery 's Own Bottling 

JOHN WIELAND BREWERY 

Phone Douglas 671 

SAN FRANCISCO 




City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. W. P. Agnew has moved his office to thia city, and is now to be 
found In Room 424, Flood Building. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m 2941 Wasnlngton street. 
Telephone "West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 40S 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN E i S-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist formerly of 8 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and In- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg.. 830 Market St Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohrr, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. £17 Montgomery St.. above Bush, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. Phone Douglas 601. 





MAYERL E'S GERMAN EY EWATER 

Is a perfectly harmless eye remedy 

for strained. Inflamed, sore, wniwy 

painful, burning, smarting, blurring. 

itchy eyes: red. gluey or heavy lids: 

Moating spots, injured eyes, indispensable for mechanics exposing their eyes 

to the wind, sun and dust. At druggists 50c : by mall 6, r ic, direct from 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician and Optometrist 

960 Market St, Sin Francisco 

Charier Member of America* Aisociatioa of Opticiini (Eaiabliihed 18 Yean) 

Maverle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers '■ chemical cloth i, large size 3 for 25c 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, Santa Rosa. 
Ftrst-< l 



es fiom San Francisco. 



Dr. Byron Halnea, Dentist, has resumed practice at his offices in Gunst 

Building. S. W nd Powell streets. 



BYRON MAUZY 

Established 1884 
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS 

INNER PLAYER MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

PIANOS SHEET MUSIC 

VICTOR VICTROLAS-GRAFONOLAS 

244-250 STOCKTON ST., UNION SQUARE 

Teleohone Douglas 4355 SAN FRANCISCO 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 26, 1913. 



REMEMBER! ! ! 

WE WHITE 
Liability Insurance, in all its branches, Automo- 
bile, Plate Glass, Burglary, Elevator, and Health 
and Accident Insurance. 

PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY 

C. H. CRAWFORD, President 



San Francisco, Cal. 



1863 



1913 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $8,650,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

Geo. E. Billing-! Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Diosmore J. C. Menssdorffer James W. Deao 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 

Phone Douglas 2283 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Home Phone C 2899 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1860. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total Assets 7,736.110 

Surplus to' Policyholders 3,266,021 

Pacific Department: 

Alaska Commercial Building ... San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 

Capital, $100,000 Assets, Over a Million 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best in the West) 
Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers— Marshal A. Frank. Vice-President; Carl G.Brown. Secretary: 
F. P. Deering, Counsel. L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and 

Health Department. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building. San Francisco. 

The Home Insurance Company 

Organized 1853. Cash Capital, $3, 000, 000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners any- 
where in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss by 
tire. Automobile insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental income by Are. 
H. L. ROFF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent. 

321 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



OPPOSITE MISSION STREET 
ENTRANCE TO EMPORIUM 



P. E. O'HAIR & CO. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

SOLD DIRECT TO YOU 



857 MISSION ST. 



Phone Sutter 1813 




INSVMCB 




The "Blue Sky" referendum be- 
"Blue Sky" Referendum, ing invoked by the California As- 
sociation of Investment Com- 
panies is, to all appearances, proving a pronounced success. It 
is claimed that already more than 20,000 signatures have been 
secured, which leaves a small margin necessary in order to 
restrain the operation of the new law. 

It is the intention of the members of the association to put 
forward a substitute for the proposed law, by means of the in- 
itiative at the same election at which the law passed by the 
Legislature is voted upon. Proponents of the referendum are 
satisfied that they will be able to defeat the Legislature's meas- 
ure and have their own substituted. Sentiment in both Los 
Angeles and San Francisco seems to favor the Association. 
» • • 

During the first half of July, the 
Fire Losses This Month, fire losses reported have been very 

heavy. The Pacific Coast Ad- 
justment Bureau and the independent adjusters have been kept 
busy during the past two weeks throughout the field. The larger 
fires reported thus far for the month of July are : Fire at San 
Mateo County, July 9th, Pacific Bone & Fertilizer Company, es- 
timated loss $200,000; July 9th, at Fresno, two blocks in the 
Armenian and German-Russian quarter, vicinity of San Benito 
and E streets, estimated loss $25,000, lack of water pressure 
reported to have been the cause of fire spreading; at Durham, 
Butte County, July 10th, grain fire, estimated loss $14,000; at 
Napa, fire in the business section, July 11th, estimated loss 
$100,000; July 14th, at Placerville, fire which destroyed chief 
buildings of the business section, estimated loss of $50,000. 
List of companies and adjustment figures will be published as 

soon as available. 

* * * 

As a result of numerous inquiries 
Company in and widespread interest concerning 

Good Condition. the investigation of the Western 

States Life of San Francisco, which 
is being conducted by the Utah, California and New Mexico in- 
surance departments, Commissioner Done, of Utah, has made 
the following statement: 

"Inquiries are reaching the insurance department as to the 
results of the recent examination of the Western States Life In- 
surance Company of San Francisco, in which the Utah commis- 
sioner participated. The examination was made by the depart- 
ments of California, New Mexico and Utah, representatives of 
the three departments personally visiting the home office of the 
company. 

"The results of the examination were very satisfactory. The 
company was found in excellent condition, its reserves care- 
fully safe-guarded and its affairs competently managed. 
Policyholders in this company are amply protected, as in all 
legal reserve life companies, under the insurance laws of the 
States. The examination was purely a routine one, conducted 
under the direction of the committee of examinations of the 
National convention." 



OLD FORESTER 

Finest Whisky in the World 
Straight from Distillery to You 

Take a bottle home and treat your friends right 

ALL DEALERS 
Cut red number off the label, bring It to our office and re- 
ceive a Pocket Memo Book. 

KENTUCKY MERCANTILE CO. 

488 Sutter St. San Francisco Phone Sutter 4081 



July 26, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



Charge Fraud 
In Oregon. 



C. D. Babcock and Harvey Beck- 
with, members of the commission 
appointed under the Oregon work- 
men's compensation act, which was 
restrained from going into effect July 1st by referendum 
petitions filed with the Secretary of State, have preferred 
charges of fraud in the securing of names to the petition which 
halted the act. Governor West of Oregon has named a special 
agent to represent him in an investigation of the manner in 
which the referendum petitions were completed and hearings 
on the case have been held at Portland during the past week 
It is claimed by two members of the commission that a number 
of worthless signatures are still on the petitions, and that the 
same names appear on two or three petitions. Six circulators 

have been subpoenaed to appear before the Grand Jury. 

* * * 

The Grand Jury at Portland has returned indictments against 
J. C. La France and Emily La France, his wife, who were 
arrested several months ago on the charge of swindling the 
Postal Life and two fraternal orders of $15,000. La France 
disappeared while on a fishing expedition. Later a body wear- 
ing his clothes was found in the Willamette river, and being 
badly decomposed, was accepted by the insurance companies as 
that of La France. They paid Mrs. La France the insurance 
carried by her husband, but later discovering the fraud, secured 
the arrest of the La Frances after a year's search for their 
whereabouts. 

* * * 

The Iowa Life Underwriters' Association has adopted a 
resolution endorsing San Francisco as the convention place of 
the National Association of Life Underwriters in 1915. The 
Iowa organization is the sixth local association to officially 
approve San Francisco as the National meeting place for that 
year. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE— CHIEFLY SLANG. 

A language such as American, the common tongue of a 
curious and talkative people, is necessarily composed largely, 
if not chiefly, of what the intransigeant school teacher would 
call slang. Slang in itself, it must be obvious, does not differ 
essentially from any other material of speech. All that may 
be validly said against it is that it is new, that it has not yet 
won the support of the convention. No other objection un- 
covers a character that you will not find in equal flower in 
wholly orthodox metaphor. Say that it is extravagant and far- 
fetched, and you also attack some of our noblest similes and 
hyperboles. Say that it is vulgar and you also attack Shakes- 
peare's "There's the rub," a figure grounded upon the fact that 
a tight shoe is uncomfortable, and causes corns. No man can 
write English without using the slang of yesteryear; no man 
can speak English without using more or less of the slang 
of to-day. The distinguished trait of the American is simply 
his tendency to use slang without any false sense of impro- 
priety, his eager hospitality to its most audacious novelties, his 
ingenuous yearning to. augment the conciseness, the sprightli- 
ness, and, in particular, what may be called the dramatic punch 
of his language. It is ever his effort to translate ideas into 
terms of overt acts, to give the intellectual a visual and striking 
quality. 

Always his one desire is to make speech lucid, lively, dra- 
matic, staccato, arresting, clear — and to that end he is willing 
to sacrifice every purely aesthetic consideration. He judges 
language as he judges poetry, not at all by its grace of form, 
but wholly by its clarity and poignancy of content. He has 
no true sense of the sough and sweetness of words; all he can 
understand is their crash and brilliance. He is like — or, more 
accurately, he is himself — a musician with an abnormal de- 
velopment of feeling for rhythm and resonance, and no feeling 
whatever for phrasing and tone-color. — H. L. Mencken in 
August Smart Set. 

The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 11:111:1; AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
:s printed and published even Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Suit.- Cal. Tel. Kearny S694. 
Bmtered al Sal law mall matter. 

New fork 01 re information may be obtained regarding sub- 

scriptions and advertising)— S. 1-. Carman, representative, 166 Fifth Ave. 
Chicago Office — Jno A Tenney, IBS Peoples Gas Building. Chi. 

■■it ifflce- Chai les S 1 'arr 52E r- eii 
London Offl Streel .v Co., 30 Cornhlll, K C, England. 

Matter Intended ion in the current number of the SAN 

FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 
nt to the office not late, than ."< p. 111. Wednesday, 
rlptlon Rates (Including r. 54.00; 6 months, $:.25. 

Foreign— 1 year. 56.00; 6 month!,. 53.25. 



DOMINICAN 

SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



COLLEGE 



4* 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for heatthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



SNELL SEMINARY 

2721 Charming Way, Berkeley 

Boarding and day school. 
Founded 1874. From pri- 
mary to college entrance, 
August 12, 1913 

ADELAIDE SMITH 

Principal 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 



Rifle Range. 
August 18th, 
of the year, 
to August. 



Thirty-sixth Academic Year begins 
1913. Cadets may enter any time 
Summer camp on Eel River, June 

Principals 



REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School (or Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Be*t 



Alloa Betft 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1825 California Street 



Ufa Classes 
Day and NlrM 



Illustrating 
SkstobJnr 
Pain tine 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO. CAL. A home school for boys desiring a thorough 
preparation for college in a minimum of time. Location adjacent 
to Stanford Cnivercnty permits unusual advantages. Opens August 
26th. Send for catalogue. W. A. SHEDD. Headmaster. 



VALUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

SS FIRST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 
Phones: Kearny 392 J 1538 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WISH 



32 



San Francisco News Letter JuLY 26 ' 1913 

HOTEL AND SUMMER RESORTS 



Low Rates East 

Via 

Southern Pacific 

Good on Limited Trains, also on Fast 
Express Trains with Tourist Sleeping Cars. 

Excellent Dining Car Service on All 
Trains. 

Stopovers Both Going and Returning. 

ROUND TRIP 



Baltimore 


$107.50 


Boston 


110.50 


Chicago 


72.50 


Colorado Springs 


55.00 


Dallas, Tex. 


62.50 


Denver 


55.00 


Duluth 


83.30 


Houston 


62.50 


Kansas City 


60.00 


Memphis 


70.00 


Minneapolis 


75.70 


Montreal 


108.50 


New Orleans 


70.00 


New York 


108.50 


Philadelphia 


108.50 


Quebec 


116.50 


St. Louis 


70.00 


St. Paul 


75.70 


Toronto 


95.70 


Washington 


107.50 


and other 


points 



Sale Dates — 
July 30, 31. 

August 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28. 
September 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11. 

Final return limit three months from date of sale, but not 
later than October 31, 1913. 



Southern Pacific 

SAN FRANCISCO : Flood Building, Palace Hotel, Ferry 
Station. Phone Kearny 3160. Third and Townsend 
Street Station. Phone Kearny 180. 

OAKLAND : Thirteenth street and Broadway. Phone 
Oakland 162. Sixteenth St. Station, Phone Lakeside 
1420. First-St. Station, Phone Oakland 7960. 



WITTER SPRINGS 

Lake County's Finest Hotel 

NOW OPEN 

WILL BE OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND. 
HIGH CLASS IN EVERY DETAIL. A 
PLACE FOR PERFECT REST AND 
HEALTH. FOR IMFORMATION AND 
RESERVATIONS ADDRESS 

Mrs.W.F. Morris, Hotel Victoria, 
Bush and Stockton Sts., S. F. 



HOTEL BEN LOMOND 

AND 

COTTAGES 

Incorporated 

Renovated and fully equipped. Permanent and 
first-class management. All modern conveniences 
and amusements. 

Address "Manager" 

Hotel Ben Lomond 

Ben Lomond Santa Cruz County, Cal. 



YOSEMITE VALLEY 

A VACATION GROUND 

Tosemite never loses Sts charm through the changing seasons. Its 
fascination lingers through the summer months. Its walls and 
domes are just as impressive. Its woodland and meadows, its trails 
and by-paths are Just as alluring. Its moun- 
tain air and quiet Shades arc just as restful. 
YOSEMITE IS YOSEMITE THE YEAR 

AROUND 
It grows more popular each year. Thou- 
sands visit it as a sightseeing trip. Other 
U i usands spend theli vacations there and 

live for weeks amid its grandeurs. 

YOSEMITE IS THE PLACE FOR REST 
AND RECREATION 

Dally outings to points Of interest. Jolly 
times around the evening camp fires. There 
are hotels and boarding camps for those who 
wish, and private camping for those who 
prefer this way. Ask any Ticket Agent for 
V/osemlte Outing Folder. 

A BEAUTIFUL SOUVENIR BOOKLET 

Mailed on receipt "i one dollar, a er-m of 
the printing art; :;■.' pases in full colors. Con- 
tains no advertisements. 




YOSEMITE VALLEY 

RAILROAD COMPANY 

Merced. Cal. 





BiUNUh.,1 July 20. IBM 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, August 2, 1913 



No. 5 



The gamblers are simply waiting until this latest spasm 

passes. 

The Balkans continue to be the favorite summer society 

resort of the vultures. 



The hero of "Three Weeks" is to marry. 

how he escaped so long. 



One wonders 



Will they never let Ananias rest ? Let's change the name 

of the club to the Mulhall. 

Roosevelt is going to Australia. He'll give the kanga- 
roos lessons in hopping about. 

A New York tailor says that men's trousers are to be 

slit. We thought they were already. 

Orville Wright says aviation is just ai safe as motoring 

— but they both seem to keep on killing. 

Queen Mary is trying to stop ragtime. An easy way to 

find out that royalty is not omnipotent. 

Between the slit skirt and the "bunny hug," Father Time 

can certainly put a red circle around 1913. 

No wonder Secretary Bryan goes on the lecture platform. 

He never did believe in easy-chair office-holders. 

Perseverance is not yet a dead virtue — Harry Thaw 

is still trying to get out of the custody of the law. 

A South Carolina preacher says no clothes for women 

are preferable to the present fashion. Naughty, naughty! 

A new airship is expected to cross the Atlantic in forty- 
eight hours. It will probably hit the Atlantic in far less time. 

Mis. Bryan has gone home to can fruit. And William 

J. continues to uncan his ancient speeches before the Chau- 
tauquas. 

An Oakland man was given three months in jail for 

punching his wife three times. At that rate, a knockout would 
be hanging. 

There would be one consolation if all those municipal 

roads were built — it wouldn't take many men to operate them 
after the Fair crowds left. 

Whether Colonel Bryan can live on $12,000 a year or 

not, there are a lot of people helping to swell his Chautauqua 
receipts who live on a great deal less. 

Mexico and the Balkans seem to be engaged in a com- 
petition to see which can produce the most victories without 
any particular opponent being defeated. 

Japanese women want "their merits openly and properly 

recognized." Will that police chief who placed the ban on 
too transparent gowns please take notice. 



Those who are wildly clamoring for the United States 

to take Mexico will never enlist in anything more dangerous 
than the Stay-At-Home-Typewriter-Brigade. 

At least one 1 woman is really honest — a voice from the 

underworld told the Bulletin that she tempted the man as much 
as he did her, and that that's what they all do. 

Anthanasios Fotios Apostolopoulus wants to become a 

citizen. The fact that he can remember his own name makes 
him eligible from the standpoint of intelligence. 

A burglar caught in a residence the other evening said 

he came in through the window because he thought the house 
was on fire. However, he didn't wait to be fired. 

One reason for lack of success in world arbitration plans 

is the fact that we still seem unable to establish arbitration as 
the one and only means of settling industrial disputes. 

The rat that has been making itself a pest around the 

Governor's office has been killed. But the Bull Moose still 
bellows, and the nigger continues to haunt the woodpile. 

The Mexican Minister of Finance has resigned because 

he was not in accord with Huerta's policy. He is a wise Mexi- 
can Minister who resigns without waiting for the rifle's crack. 

By way of suggestion, how would it be to elect a third 

legislative body at Washington to do investigating of the acts 
of the other two, thus speeding up on the regular work by the 
other bodies? 

Thirteen blind pigs have been raided in Siskiyou, where 

the liquor dealers boast that business has doubled since the 
county went dry. The temperance people are far more blind 
than the pigs. 

It would be funny, if it were not so serious, the way 

those Turks are re-capturing so many places without opposi- 
tion, when there were so many lives lost on both sides in their 
capture by the Allies. 

A writer on Japanese women says they are cowed by 

masculine tyranny. Jt's a pity some of the secrets of accom- 
plishing the feat could not be learned by the militant per- 
secuted Englishmen. 

It's a shame the way they are rubbing it in on prohibi- 
tionists. Statistics continue to show that making a town dry 
has a habit of increasing the general thirst, consequently the 
amount of imported beverages. 

Registration in preparation for the coming bond election 

has reached many thousands, and, says the Examiner, the 
prospects for the success of the Mayor's pet scheme are there- 
fore brighter than ever. Yet not very many signified their ab- 
solute intention of voting for the bonds when they registered. 
Funny what a great gift of second-sight some people possess. 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 




It seems that there is a crying 
Get Down to necessity for some one with the 

Business. proper authority striking at the root 

of all these vague rumors and hints 
as to further deplorable conditions in San Francisco's police 
department. There seems to be a lot of futile bandying of 
"suspicions," and not enough real, earnest endeavor to end 
once and for all every possible question as to the efficiency 
and integrity of our police officials and the men under them 
who are supposed to be the guardians of the public peace and 
order. 

The revelations resulting from the prosecution and convic- 
tion of ceriain members of the city detective bureau have been 
such as to cause others to look 'upon us with anything but re- 
spect. 

San Francisco has enemies in plenty, as has any city which 
amounts to anything or has a future of any promise at all. 
San Francisco is preparing to entertain the world in 1915, and 
expects to demonstrate beyond doubt that we have everything 
here which we have endeavored to represent in other ways. 
And such being the case, why should we place in the hands of 
our enemies, those jealous of our future, such a weapon as the 
"rumors" now going the rounds? 

The constant repetition of insinuations against the integrity 
of the heads of our police department cannot but reflect to our 
everlasting discredit. Let us get down to business and end 
them, once and for all. If there exist any of the conditions 
which are implied, then the people want to know at once, and 
want those conditions remedied. If our police chief or any of 
the other officials are not the men they should be, then they 
should be promptly replaced by the right men. And the sooner 
it is done, the better for every one and for the good name of the 
city. 

3B- 

Despite the seriousness of the Mexi- 
The Mexican Problem, can situation, there is something 
more or less amusing about it. That 
there has been a determined attempt on the part of some one 
to force the hands of the Administration at Washington is, of 
course, apparent to every one. 

The announcement that the administration had in view a plan 
which involved a sort of protectorate over the portion of Mex- 
ico lying north of the twenty-sixth parallel, which was made 
at the first of the present week, was perhaps the most amusing 
of all the rumors as to the decision of our Department of State. 

Any one who has followed the growth of the problem in 
Mexico at all closely will see in such a policy, not the will of 
the people of this country or of the President, but the handi- 
work of certain gentlemen and interests said to own large hold- 
ings in the neighborhood of the proposed protectorate. 

But, no matter what newspapers and those who assume ex- 
tensive knowledge of the workings of the mind of official Wash- 
ington, may have to say, there can be no doubt 'but that the 
majority of the people of this country are not particularly 
anxious to intervene, if it means the assumption of all respon- 
sibility for setting up a stable government in Mexico, par- 
ticularly at the price we would have to pay for the privilege. 
At the same time, it would seem that friendly mediation, which 
was suggested, would not be as foolish as Ambassador Wilson 
is reputed to have declared it to be. 



The visit of the gentleman who pre- 
Pleased With sides over the destinies of our navy 

His Visit. under the Wilson Administration 

seems to have been an all-round 
pleasant affair. There can be no doubt but that San Francis- 
cans were all pleased with it, and Secretary Daniels asserted 
that he had assuredly felt at home during his stay. 

The knowledge gained from the Cabinet Minister that upon 
the opening of the Panama Canal the fleet will come "to its 
home in the Pacific" is something beyond the fondest hopes of 
the most sanguine citizen on the Pacific Coast. We have had 
many suave little compliments and many statements which, 
when thought over carefully, really never meant anything at 
all. But we can rest assured now that the promise of the Sec- 
retary of the Navy is something which we can bank on. 

There are a lot of good things which are coming to the 
Pacific Coast and to San Francisco when the great Canal is 
finally opened. We have been certain of them all the time, and 
we have not been slow to herald the fact abroad. But the de- 
termination of the government to send the fleet to our shores, 
and not on a flying visit, but to stay here, is indisputable proof 
that the effete East has at last come to a lealization that all 
we Westerners have been saying about ourselves has a founda- 
tion of fact. 

We feel certain that Secretary Daniels will return to Wash- 
ington an ardent "booster" for San Francisco. He said many 
nice things about us, and we believe that he meant them and 
will tell the people in the East the same things with even a 
little more enthusiasm. Altogether, no matter what political 
party may receive the affections of the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco, the News Letter believes that they will one and all vote 
the visit one they are thankful for. 

SB" 
This week's visit of the Hoosier 
A Good Roads Boost. tourists is an event which cannot be 
passed without special comment, 
because it marked the successful completion of what is unde- 
niably the biggest boost ever attempted in the great nation- 
wide campaign for good roads. 

We can appreciate the feeling of satisfaction which prompted 
the visiting members of the Indiana Automobile Manufacturers' 
Association to exclaim: "San Francisco — at last!" In fact, v/e 
believe that we are to hear that same expression from the lips 
of many thousands who will flock here to share with us in our 
advantages when the Panama Canal completes the last link in 
the chain which will bind us closer to every corner of the 
world. 

San Francisco has indeed cause to be gratified at the com- 
pletion of the Hoosier undertaking. Probably no more potent 
influence has been brought to bear upon the great work of de- 
veloping interest in good roads than that of the automobile en- 
thusiasts of this city. And now that the boosters from Indiana 
have clasped hands with us at the end of their long journey, 
the work can go on with a vim which will overcome all ob- 
stacles and quickly reach the fulfillment which the Hoosiers 
undertook their trip to promote. 

There is a lot of good hard work to be done yet; but there 
can be no doubt but that the Indianans' accomplishment of 
this week will give that work an impetus which it could not 
Otherwise receive. 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



The Foss Bomb. 



At this writing, it seems that the 

bomb hurled so dramatically into 

the camp of the Democratic tariff 

tinkerers by our considerate friend, William Randolph Hearst, 

has miserably failed to bring about the desired effect. 

With many flourishes and predictions of dire results, the an- 
nouncement was made by the Hearst newspapers that Governor 
Foss of Massachusetts intended to move the greater portion of 
his blower works to Canada. And the announcement afforded 
Mr. Hearst an opportunity to inform the American people that 
he had told them on former occasions that just such a calamity 
was likely to happen if the government at Washington was so 
shortsighted as to consider his advice as unworthy of any 
special attention. 

But to all'appearances, the bomb has fizzled. It seems to 
have created about as much sensation as an ordinary Fourth of 
July penny pin-wheel. 

It must, indeed, be disheartening to Mr. Hearst, after all the 
time, thought and money he has spent within the past few 
years cabling from Paris to his newspapers throughout this 
country, to find out that, after all, there are evidently very few 
people in the United States who appreciate the "striking 
force and common sense" of his messages on the tariff question. 

Referring to the action of Governor Foss, the Springfield 
Weekly Republican says : "The Governor's continued mouth- 
ings about reciprocity are both stale and profitless. His per- 
sonal tariff policy, if adopted by Congress to-day, would lead 
simply nowhere. Great Britain is a free trade country, and 
the reciprocity policy would not apply to her. Canada has 
had reciprocity offered to her and has refused it. With the 
rest of the world Mr. Foss would be a long time negotiat- 
ing. . . . According to bis ideas, we should go without free 
wool indefinitely, unless we could arrange a quid pro quo to 
to suit a country like Australia." 

Governor Foss is going to Canada because he is a protec- 
tionist at heart, and because he does not mean anything he 
says about reciprocity. He does not look for reciprocity any 
more than does Mr. Hearst. 

And, as to Canada, having refused reciprocity, probably the 
most potent factor in bringing it about was the fact that, dur- 
ing the campaign which ended in the defeat of the Canadian 
political party which advocated it, Hearst maintained a special 
and extensive news service throughout Canada, which was de- 
voted to espousing the cause of reciprocity. 

And even as the Canadians looked upon Hearst's champion- 
ing of reciprocity with distrust, even so must the American peo- 
ple look upon his opposition to Democratic tariff plans as one 
of the strongest arguments in favor of their acceptance. 

Mr. Hearst seems to think that, because he sent a few cables 
to his newspapers in September and October last year, and 
made certain statements to the London Standard, which, as 
far as we know, did not create any considerable impression, 
the men who are engaged in adjusting our tariff on a proper 
basis should lay aside all plans and let the consumers of the 
country continue to pay toll to the manufacturers until such 
time as some mythical reciprocal trade arrangements can be 
made with the nations of the world. 

But, if we judge aright the temper of the masses of the peo- 
ple, Hearst and his advices will prove about as effectual as 
did his Foss removal bomb. We believe that there are other 
fields of endeavor better suited to Mr. Hearst and his rather 
peculiar abilities, and he wil) therefore do well to leave the 
destinies of our trade and commerce in the hands of those 
who are more concerned for the general welfare of the whole 
people than they are about the pretensions of a few men 
like Governor Foss of Massachusetts. 



For more than a century, the Mon- 
The Monroe Doctrine, roe Doctrine has acted as a check 
to European nations who have cast 
their eyes towards the American continent, and has guaranteed 
to the people of Latin-America that they should remain un- 
molested and enjoy a republican form of government. 

And yet, William Kent, Congressman from the First Cali- 
tornia District, has declared that we owe no duty, that we 
should undo the work of the past hundred years, and invite 
Europe to come to America and take her pick. Congressman 
Kent is but following in the footsteps of those members of 
both Federal Houses who would cause the United States to de- 
clare to the world that it has an utter disregard for any and all 
obligations which, when at all irksome, should be abrogated. 

Congressman Kent believes that now that Mexico seems to 
have become too troublesome a question for this country to be 
bothered with, no matter what may be our national duty in 
that regard, we should foreswear the principles which have so 
steadfastly been adhered to in the past, and allow avaricious 
Europe to step across the Atlantic and start gobbling. 

In the event of the nation accepting such a proposal, this 
country would of course demand her share of the spoils. And 
consider the shameful result of such a course. Latin-America 
would be rent and robbed. Instead of atrocities confined to 
Mexico, trfe whole continent would be the scene of an even 
more uncivilized and barbarous struggle. The strongest would, 
of course, win out, but what of the people who now enjoy the 
right of attempting to build up a government for themselves? 

The picture which is called to mind by the suggestion of 
Congressman Kent is something which would forever stamp 
the United States as craven among the nations. And because 
it does, Americans cannot afford to do aught but remain with 
faces set squarely to the world in defense of those principles 
which have made for greatness in the past. The future has 
many bright and good things in store for us which we cannot 
lose sight of. The Panama Canal, one of the marvels of the 
age, would be rendered useless in so far as the great under- 
taking behind its construction is concerned. No, America can- 
not now turn back or run from obligations. 



McReynolds Still 
Under Fire. 



Representative Kahn continues ac- 
tive in what members of Congress 
style an attempt to carry on a con- 
spiracy of muckraking with the ob- 
ject of discrediting Attorney-General McReynolds in connec- 
tion with the Diggs-Caminetti affair. 

That there is a conspiracy of this kind seems to be indicated 
by reason of the fact that certain rumors were recently pub- 
lished in the newspapers, both in California and in the East, to 
the effect that there was likely to be a still further delay in the 
trial of the two Sacramento men because of an effort on the part 
of the Department of Justice at Washington to interpret the 
Mann Act so as to absolve the accused white slavers. 

If it is, as certain members of Congress have declared, then 
such scenes as that witnessed in the House on Tuesday last 
are a disgrace to our government and some of the members of 
that House. The prosecution of both the Western Fuel case 
and the Diggs-Caminetti affair are going forward as fast as 
determined prosecutors can push them. And there is nothing 
yet to justify the assertions of those who would cheapen the 
proceedings of the American House of Congress by wasting 
valuable time in pure scandal-mongering. Perhaps Representa- 
tive Kahn and his associates in the filibuster in this matter 
consider that they are making a strong bid for popular ap- 
plause. But we are inclined to believe that they will be dis- 
appointed, 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 



YOUR PROBLEM, MR. TAXPAYER 

THE SERIOUSNESS OF THE PROBLEM FRONTING EVERY TAXPAYER IN 
THE CITY CANNOT BE MINIMIZED BY TACTICS OF THE HEARST NEWSPAPER 



THE PROBLEM. 

The people of this city, or rather the taxpayers, have before 
them a most momentous problem which demands their most 
careful consideration. They must not allow any promises, 
however roseate, to blind them to the facts on both sides of 
the question. 

The taxpayers of San Francisco will be required, on August 
26th, to decide whether or not they are willing that an issue 
of $3,500,000 in bonds for the extension of the municipal street 
railway system shall be placed upon the market. 

This is your problem, Mr. Taxpayer. . It is you who will be 
called upon to foot all bills should you decide to let this bond 
issue go through. It is not the United Railroads' burden — it 
is not the burden of William Randolph Hearst. If you want to 
accept the burden, do so with your eyes open and because you 
believe, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that by doing so you 
are going to get something tangible in return, either for your- 
self or your children, and for the city at large. 

Do not allow anyone to detract your attention from the ques- 
tion at issue. 

You know that the market is already flooded with several 
millions of dollars in the bonds of the city of San Francisco. 
And you know that those bonds are begging. It is not your 
fault, of course, but it is a fact just the same. 

You know that the promises of the present civic administra- 
tion regarding the City Hall, the County Jail and the County 
Hospital have not amounted to a hill of beans, because the 
bonds issued for the purpose of their fulfillment cannot be sold. 

San Francisco is not the only corporation having difficulties 
in the sale of bonds — they are all facing the same proposition. 
Then is there any assurance that, with the issue of more than 
three million and a half in your bonds, on a market so over- 
crowded, your street railway extensions are going to be com- 
pleted any quicker than your City Hall, County Jail and 
Hospital ? 

Mr. Taxpayer, you know that the directors of the 1915 Ex- 
position have attempted for some time to emphasize the fact 
that there is going to be a lack of transportation for the im- 
mense crowds which will be in this city to visit that great 
world gathering at Harbor View. And you know that the en- 
gineer employed by the city to investigate the problem de- 
clared in his official report that the plans projected whiGh were 
to involve the expenditure of $3,500,000 would not relieve the 
situation as far as handling crowds for the Fair is concerned. 

You know that, if the plans of Mayor Rolph and his would-be 
railroad builders are carried out by your authorization of the 
bonds, every possible avenue of approach which might be 
utilized for solving the problem of Exposition transportation 
will be blocked effectually. 

Are you so greedy for municipal street railway ownership 
and operation, Mr. Taxpayer, that you are willing to crowd 
the market still further with bonds and endanger your credit, 
in the face of all these facts? 

This is not a question as to what the opinion of the Exami- 
ner is or the opinion of the United Railroads or any one else. 
It's a question which you alone are interested in, and you are 
the one who will have to answer it. 



A JOKE. 

The San Francisco Examiner declares that the opponents 
of the bond issue seem to consider that "the desire of the peo- 
ple is a joke." 

And, furthermore, the Examiner wishes to create the impres- 
sion that its editorial columns, together with a certain commit- 
tee of one hundred office-holders, small politicians and ex- 
pectant office-holders, voice the "desire of the people." 

Mr. Taxpayer, let us ask you a question. Have you author- 
ized the San Francisco Examiner or any committee of one 
hundred citizens, good, bad or indifferent, to give public ex- 
pression to your desires in the matter of this bond issue? If 
you have, then the fact has been kept surprisingly quiet. 

It appears that the San Francisco Examiner is only taking 
itself a little more seriously than even such men as William 
Randolph Hearst generally do. The desire of the people will 
not be known until the last ballot is counted after the election 
on the twenty-sixth of this month. Therefore it seems that the 
Examiner is a trifle premature in announcing that it possesses 
advance intelligence as to what that desire is. 

It seems that, instead of the opponents of this bond issue 
treating the desire of the people as ridiculous, that the Exami- 
ner has made itself something closely resembling a joke. 

The San Francisco Chronicle alluded to the committee of 
one hundred, which had been appointed to look after the 
boosting of the pet project of the Supervisors and Mayor 
Rolph, in a manner which failed to show recognition of what 
che Examiner considers "earnest citizenship." And there is 
nothing about the committee to justify the suspicion that its 
championing of the bond issue is earnest citizenship. Again, 
the joke appears to be on the Examiner. 

Speaking again of the statement often repeated by the Hearst 
mouthpiece, that the voting of this bond issue will not in- 
crease the tax burden, there appears to be a lack of logic even 
more ridiculous than the Examiner is generally prone to. 

Mr. Taxpayer, you know full well that the extension of the 
street railway system means the increase of municipal hangers- 
on, which means that more of your money is going to be 
grabbed by those upon whom whatever gang of politicians is 
running the thing look with favor. And, in anticipation of your 
acceptance of the bond issue, the favored ones no doubt have 
been assured of their positions. Are you not the one who is 
most interested in the payment of those salaries, Mr. Tax- 
payer? Or is Mr. Hearst or James Rolph going to assume the 
payment ? 

You have been told that the Geary street line is paying good 
profits. Perhaps it is, and it would be a wonder if it did not, 
considering the fact that it is a new toy and that traffic along 
that route is greatest at this time. But do we know for certain 
that it will keep it up, or that the increased construction will 
add to your profits? There is a point you have to consider. 
And the assurances of the Examiner will not help you any nor 
will that of paid employees of the city, who are interested in 
their salaries first and your benefit next. 

Think it over, Mr. Taxpayer — treat the assumption by Mr. 
Hearst of the right to speak for you and voice his sentiments 
for yours as a joke, which might lead you into deep water. 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 




The other day a certain young millionaire actually 

donned overalls and sweater and personally superintended the 
loading of his private yacht. And the fact was noted on the 
front page of a certain morning newspaper as a news item 
second only to the critical condition of affairs in Mexico. To 
the student of political economy and history, this great inci- 
dent is altogether likely to appeal as one of the strongest evi- 
dences of the great wave of democracy which is now spreading 
over the United States. The next startling evidence will likely 
be the visit to one of the leading cafes of the driver of a milk 
wagon, silk-hatted and wearing conventional evening attire, 
even though he may rent his apparel for the occasion. We are 
indeed reaching the limit in democratic habits when our mil- 
lionaires step down momentarily from their pinnacles. Yet 
almost every evening some young aristocrat dons his silk and 
velvet smoking jacket, and personally superintends the light- 
ing of his gold-tipped cigarette by his own trusted valet. The 
next thing we know some scion of a wealthy family will actu- 
ally pack his own suitcase and carry it to the railway depot 
all by himself. 

With the arrival of the transparent gown in San Fran- 
cisco, arrests will soon be in order. The result will be that 
the gowns will be advertised, and more women will be 
prompted to wear them. The Puritans seem unable to learn 
that both evil and fancied evil may be promoted by making 
loud noises of condemnation, by arrest and persecution. The 
world should be old enough now for the realization to be plain 
that women will wear as much or as little as they please, and 
that the more fuss that is made about it, the more anxious they 
will be to don startling effects. The transparent gown would 
last about a week if the wearers were given no publicity. Look 
at Eve — she changed from the fig leaf to more elaborate 
clothing just because there was no policeman to arrest her. 
Had there been a purity league in the Garden, she would have 
discarded even the leaf. 

The tone of the fog siren on Alcatraz Island is to be 

so modified that the inhabitants of Russian and Telegraph Hills 
may sleep, they having sent complaints to Washington of the 
raucous notes issuing from the throat of the danger signal. In- 
stead of a siren, why not a huge phonograph that will sing 
warnings to the ships, and while the ships need no warnings, 
lullabys to the complainers? Why not "Cling to the Life 
Line" and "Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep" for bad 
weather, and "Ho For a Life on the Ocean Wave" when the 
weather is good? And why not a concert every night? Uncle 
Sam could have the hills crowded with raggers until ten o'clock, 
when he could turn on bed-time songs and put them to sleep. 
Naturally, I expect this suggestion to be scoffed at — but I am 
accustomed to sharing the fate of the prophet. 

The lady husband Vias arrived. Physicians in charge 

of an Eastern childrens' hospital are to have a weekly clinic 
for fathers, who are to be taught the proper care of baby when 
the mother is away. He will be told how and when to feed 
the youngster, and other and more intimate details of caring 
for the youngster will be demonstrated to him. Thus are the 
anti-suffragists given a blow right amidships. Their question 
has been: "Who will rock the cradle when mother is hustling 
in politics?" Answer— Dad will do the oscillation. 



The police have a thought — an idea — almost a clue. 

The other night a safe was blown open in the Mission. This 
makes twenty or more safes that have been cracked in this 
city since the first of the year. Arrests? There haven't been 
any. The police have been too busy formulating that thought. 
And the thought, born in travail, and with much brain strain, 
is that all the jobs have been done by one gang. You see, had 
there been twenty gangs, one of them might have stepped on 
a policeman — that is, the whole gang might have stepped on 
him, for nothing less would arouse him — then he would have 
had not only a thought, but a clue. But the one gang is too 
busy cracking safes to step on policemen — hence there is only 
a thought, but not a clue. 

San Francisco's beggars need just such treatment as has 

been given them in one of the Eastern cities, where the police 
are authorized to offer every able-bodied idler a job. Non- 
acceptance means jail. The new order is having a good effect, 
men getting out by the hundreds — the honest ones to work, the 
beggars to avoid jail. One employment agent tells of having 
offered work at $2.50 a day to hundreds of men, the majority 
of whom refused, saying they would wait for better pay., San 
Francisco is full of that tribe, and they are a nuisance to pedes- 
trians with their whines for alms. Any able-bodied man can 
at least make a living in the country — and working for one's 
board is preferable to street-begging. 

The Hod-Carriers' Union has a new grievance. The 

implements of labor that the members use are too long and 
•cumbersome to get into the street cars, so the employers have 
been notified that they must attend to the getting of the tools 
to the place of work. Of course. And while they are at it, they 
should send automobiles around to pick up the hod-carriers 
and take them to their jobs. Of course, it would be too much, 
at first, to insist that they be whirled home to luncheon, but 
Rome wasn't built in a day. It wouldn't have been built in 
a century had the builders been compelled to combat the exac- 
tions of the unions. 

At last the truth has come out. The St. Louis Globe- 
Democrat, which is opposed to any tariff change, says that 
Governor Foss is a protectionist rather than merely a Demo- 
crat. Sure, that's why he's going to Canada — the reciprocity 
talk is all bluff. 

Word comes that the Republicans have tired of trying 

to change the Democratic tariff plans. We are glad they at 
last realize that it is useless to buck a president who knows 
that the people will not stand any more bluffing from their 
chief lobbyist. 

A leading hotel was the scene of the local appearance 

of the transparent gown last week, and the Bulletin still pub- 
lishes Alice Smith's story. What's the use of anything these 
days when people go on doing the same old things all over 
again. 

Wisconsin and Pennsylvania have passed laws forbid- 
ding marriages save between those who, according to the 
opinions of appointed censors, are of sound mind. These laws 
should automatically bar the makers of them. 

And now the widow of Edward VII finds she cannot 

meet expenses on an income of $550,000 a year. It will be 
interesting to find out what she will do to augment it, since 
the militants have hogged the lecture platform. 

The promoting business does not seem to suit Willie 

Hearst. He missed fire in the case of Japan ; he does not seem 
able to defeat the tariff plans, and there is reason to believe 
that he'll fall down on his Mexican scheme. 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 



Yosemite 



$ 18 



.90 



REDUCED 

ROUND TRIP 

RATE 



During August 



From 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAKLAND, 
ALAMEDA AND BERKELEY. 

Includes stage fare between El Portal and 
Sentinel Hotel, in center of Park, 14 miles. 

TWO DAILY TRAINS 

Lv. Ferry Station 8:40 a. m. 9:40 p. m. 

Lv. Oakland (16th St.) 9:14 a. m. 10:17 p. m. 

Ar. El Portal 6:20 p. m. 7:00 a. m. 

'Pullman Sleeping Car on Night Train ) 

Round trip stage fare between Sentinel 
Hotel and Wawona (Mariposa Big Trees), 
25 miles, $15 extra. 

Similarly reduced rates from all other 
stations in California 



Return Limit 30 Days 



Southern Pacific 

THE EXPOSITION LINE— 1915 



SAN FRANCISCO : Flood Building, Palace Hotel, Ferry 
Station. Phone Kearny 3160. Third and Townsend 
Street Station. Phone Kearny 180. 

OAKLAND : Thirteenth street and Broadway. Phone 
Oakland 162. Sixteenth St. Station, Phone Lakeside 
1420. First-St. Station, Phone Oakland 7960. 



THE BATTLE OF BAGSAK 



By J. Hudson Curry. 

(This story, specially written, for the News Letter by the edi- 
tor of the Free Lance, Iloilo, P. I., gives the first authentic ac- 
count of the great battle between the Philippine scouts under 
General Pershing, and hostile Mows, on the Island of Jolo, be- 
ginning June 11th, and ending June 15th, this year. The details 
' of the extermination of the outlaw band were subject to rigid 
censorship by the War Department. This story ivas written un- 
der great difficulties, and as a result of personal observation by 
the writer. — Editor's Note.) 

There have been many battles in which American troops 
were engaged, in the Philippines, where more men were killed 
and wounded than at the battle of Bagsak, but never has there 
been a battle where there were greater difficulties to be over- 
come by the besieging force of American troops and Philippine 
Scouts, and more heroism displayed by the attacking force, and 
fanatical disregard of death by the besieged than was displayed 
during the five days of fighting, mountain-scaling, charging and 
suffering which resulted in the complete defeat of a band of 
hostile Moros who had defied the American government, re- 
fused to surrender their arms and strongly entrenched them- 
selves on the summit of an almost impregnable mountain. The 
story of the affair from a man on the ground will probably be 
interesting. 

The Bagsak campaign which began several months ago, was 
led by General Pershing in person and while the loss of lives 
was terrible, no exact knowledge is held as to whether any of 
the Moros, numbering some two thousand, escaped. 

General Pershing kept his plans entirely to himself. It is 
said he did not even take his personal aides de camp into his 
confidence. On the fifth instant he cabled the commanding of- 
ficer at Jolo to abandon hostile movements and to withdraw 
whatever troops he had in the field. He announced, on the 
ninth, that he would go to Camp Keithley to visit his family. 
At a quarter to seven o'clock, p. m., he boarded the transport 
Wright, ostensibly for Keithley, but instead headed for Jolo. 
All lights aboard the transport were extinguished, the smoke- 
stack muffled, the Wright crept into Jolo harbor the night of the 
10th instant, about eight o'clock. Call to arms sounded and 
within a very short period of time the flying column was aboard 
launches and en route to Bum Bum. 

The Wright and the launches arrived at Bum Bum at four 
o'clock, a. m. and the troops were disembarked at once and the 
advance on Mt. Bagsak began at five-fifteen on the morning of 
June 11th. 

It would be impossible to describe the fight accurately with- 
out giving a description of the mountain in order that the dif- 
ficulties which were overcome may be appreciated. The moun- 
tain forms a huge irregular half-circle or horse-shoe, ap- 
proximately eight hundred yards in diameter and about one 
thousand yards from front to rear. Cotta Puyacabae is on one 
heel and cotta Bunga is on the other, each about the same 
height. The large, stone cotta Bigsak constitutes the toe and 
is about two hundred and fifty feet higher than the two heels. 
Cotta Matunkup is about half-way between Puyacabae and 
Bagsak on the North. Languasan is about where the frog of 
the foot would be, and Pujagan is in the center of the foot. 

After preliminary shelling on the part of the mountain guns 
which had been stationed at as advantageous points as was 
possible, the various columns advanced to the attack. The 
concerted movement was so well timed and executed that 
Captain Nichols and his trusty Moros captured Puyacabae at 
noon, sharp, Captain Charlton, with his 51st Company 
of Moros took Matunkup at twelv,e-five, and Languasan was 
captured at twelve-twenty. The co-operation was perfect. As 
one of the newspaper boys expressed it — excellent team work 
all the time.and that wins in a fight of this nature as well as on 
the gridiron or the diamond. In taking Matunkup, Captain 
Charlton and his Moros were compelled to climb an almost 
sheer cliff, over 100 feet in height. Three of this command 
were killed and five wounded. Captain Nichols, who was 
iater to lay down his life in this same battle, captured cotta 
Puyacabae without the loss of a man. 

With his Moros he slipped between Puyacabae and Matunkup 
which are only about two hundred and eighty yards apart. 



August 2, 1913. 



an 



d California Advertiser 



crawling at times through rocks and underbrush, until he finally 
reached a point behind and a little above Puyacabae cotta ; 
then volley after volley was poured into the surprised enemy, 
at close range. 

Thus ended the capture of the first of the three cottas. 



. MT. TAMALPA1S AND MUIR WOODS. 

Strange as it may seem, the recent fire that swept the slopes 
of Mt. Tamalpais and were barely put under control before they 
reached Muir Woods, have added a new tone of beauty to these 
famous scenic recreation parks. The view from the top of 
rugged old Tamalpais is just as inspiring as ever, but now there 
is more color to the vistas that greet the visitor to the moun- 
tain. The soft blending of blue-purple tints with the vivid 
greens make a picture of unusual attractiveness. 

From the Tavern at the summit of the mountain, the wide 
reaches of the bay of San Francisco and the surrounding terri- 
tory smiles like a living map at the foot of the mountain, while 
towards the west, the deep green of Muir Woods, sombre and 
stately, lure the traveler's gaze to deep, solemn beauty. 

To see this marvelously beautiful country at any time is a 
rare sight, but now when the first autumn tints are beginning 
to show, a day spent there in sightseeing and wandering amid 
the hills is an outing that calls to all who love the great out-of- 
doors. 



LAND SHOW ACTIVITIES. 

The first meeting of the Advisory Board of the California 
Land Show Exhibition is scheduled for this, Saturday, after- 
noon, to take place in the Palace Hotel, where about offe hun- 
dred, representing the agricultural and industrial interests of 
California, will be the guests of the land show committee at 
luncheon. Following the luncheon, the board will tour the city, 
ending at the Exposition site, where an elaborate program will 
be carried out attendant upon the ground breaking ceremonies. 
No little interest is being taken in the great show, as the 
reservations throughout the State give ample assurance that 
the land show will be thoroughly representative of the agri- 
cultural and horticultural interests. H. S. Madox, secretary 
of the Yolo Board of Trade, predicts great things for the com- 
ing show. "We realize the importance of the Land Show as 
a means to promote our section," said Madox. "San Francisco 
is the market place for our lands and our products, and as such 
it stands in much the same relation as a big brother to all the 
interior sections of the State. For that reason the holding of 
a State-wide land show in San Francisco is an event that no 
county can overlook." 



JOHNSON'S RECORD 

"Governor Johnson," remarks one of his newspaper admirers 
"has made a record such as no other executive of California 
ever made." He has, indeed. No other governor of Cali- 
fornia ever absented himself from the state for weeks and 
months to play national politics, drawing salary for the time 
when he was rendering no service in return. And no other 
governor of California ever played so shameless politics when 
he was at home and supposed to be attending to duty. Cali- 
fornia has had its share of executives who were politicians, 
but the records they made are as perfume compared with that 
of Johnson. — Sun Diego Union. 



Bess — Something that Jack said last night didn't sound 

just right. Tess — What was that? Bess — I told him if he 
called me pet names I wouldn't speak, and he replied that he 
would call me dear at any price. — Brooklyn Life. 



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San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 




The Balkan Shambles. 
It is decidedly difficult to comment on affairs in Southern 
Europe at present because of conflicting reports which come 
from that quarter. To all appearances, those interested in 
sending out the news from the different important centers of 
activity are vying with one another in producing a general im- 
pression that no one knows very much about the real situation. 

When the Balkan States allied and swept on Turkey, Europe 
and the rest of the world looked on in sympathy. At last a 
iown-trodder and suffering people had risen, determined to 
:orever throw off the yoke of Turkey's barbarous misrule, and 
lumanity a' large was to benefit thereby. Christendom, the 
rorld over, was on the side of the Allies, and it seemed that 
there were indeed times when war had its moral justification. 

But the developments within the past few weeks, ever since 
the defeat of the Turks and the signing of the Treaty of London, 
have been such as to cause a heretofore admiring world to 
change respect for disgust. The war with Turkey was 
filled with its horrors, but none of them could equal those 
which have been disrupting the component parts of the great 
alliance. It is pure madness and savagery which has rent the 
Balkan League — the world has come to the point where it is 
not hard to decide whether there are worse things than the bar- 
barous misrule of Turkey. 

And now comes the question: will all Europe be involved? 
The great Concert of Powers has been standing around the 
outer edge of the ring, watching the combatants, and seemingly 
passive. Mexico has been torn with strife filled with atrocities 
for the past three years, and now the United States is being 
urged, nay commanded, by Europe, to interfere and stop the 
savagery. But in the meantime, Europe stands idle and im- 
potent, and permits her horrible tragedy to go on unchecked. 

Reports to London state that Turkey is preparing for a new 
campaign on a much larger scale than that in which she was 
so terribly beaten, and the war enthusiasm of the Turkish popu- 
lace is reaching a fever pitch. 

Greece and Servia have refused to listen to the proposals of 
Roumania for an armistice, and official reports come from the 
Bulgarian capital telling of the burning of American mission- 
ary settlements by the soldiers of the Greeks. 

The Balkan Union, for the accomplishment of a great war 
for liberty and for Christianity, has been proven a farce. But 
European Powers still refuse to answer the question which 
confronts civilization — is it powerless to end the shambles? 
The call is for a higher brand of statesmanship than has as yet 
been exhibited in the strife which has torn Europe and filled 
so many lonely, blood-sodden graves. Civilization demands 
that the great Powers throw off their impassivity. Christianity 
demands that the bunkum cohesion which was formed in her 
name, only to be torn asunder when barbaric material cravings 
cried for their toll, shall be made to understand that this crown- 
ing tragedy of centuries be brought to an end. 



British Airships. 

Although the development of plans for aerial fleet construc- 
tion have been agitating the minds of Englishmen for some time 
past, there have been no new ones advanced which presage 
more national importance than those which propose to organize 
a service between London and Paris. 

The plans for this air service were announced last month, 
but the comment upon the scheme which is made in the edi- 
torial columns of the London Daily Express, the leading news- 
paper authority on the subject of airships in England, is worthy 
of note, and will prove interesting to American readers : 

"Socially and commercially," says the Express, "the new 
airship service will obviously advance enormously the science 
of aviation in this country. But the military possibilities of 
this development give it a character national rather than indus- 
trial. If, by these means, the British manufacture of British- 
manned airships be encouraged, we shall be within measurable 
distance of overtaking the long lead established by foreign 



!. countries in this connection. It is not very creditable to the 
government that private enterprise should step in to fill the 

. gap left open by official neglect of this aspect of defense. But 
if the thing is done, and if the authorities give sufficient sup- 
port to the new organization", we shall not quarrel with the 
means by which the end is reached. A saner administration 
would have long ago encouraged the inauguration of a com- 
mercial enterprise by which the War Office and the Admiralty 
might be enabled to possess themselves of British airships. 
It seems that commerce must make the first move, leaving the 
government to follow a patriotic lead." 

Gibraltar's Open Door. 
"It is announced that the gates of the fortress at Gibraltar 
have been ordered to be open till 10 o'clock at night in sum- 
mer and 9 o'clock in winter for ingress. The event is unknown 
in the annals of the Rock since the establishment of British 
rule," says Reuter's Gibraltar correspondent, "the gate having 
hitherto been closed from sunset till sunrise to the surrounding 
country. This relaxation of the rigors of fortress life is due 
to negotiations between the Spanish and British governments." 



China's Condition. 
"Three capital facts with regard to China, of which every- 
body should seize hold in England are: First, unless vastly in- 
creased taxation is willingly voted by the provinces, China 
cannot pay her way, and must become bankrupt. Secondly, 
Parliament will never vote that taxation unless its authority 
is supreme. Thirdly, if bankruptcy finally comes, foreign in- 
tervention and forcible participation under some euphemism 
will infallibly follow. Does England want this?" asks the 
Telegraph's Pekin correspondent. "The continual contempt 
that is displayed for Parliament is an evil augury for the future, 
while the massing ot Northern troops in Central China when 
well-armed Mongol bands, unchecked, are raiding the country 
far and wide just beyond the Great Wall, is a further inter- 
esting commentary on the whole policy of the present regime." 



Literature and Diplomacy. 
"We have to-day no fewer than five men of letters to repre- 
sent the United States at European courts." says the New York 
Nation. "London has W. H. Page, Rome has Thomas Nelson 
Page; Dr. Van Dyke is appointed to The Hague; Maurice F. 
Egan, now Minister at Copenhagen, is reputed to be in line for 
promotion; President Schurman, of Cornell, is our Minister 
at Athens; Mr. Meredith Nicholson, also, was asked to go to 
Lisbon. If Mr. Wilson keeps up the pace set by the nomina- 
tion of four bookmen in a row, the conditions obtaining when 
Motley, Lowell, John Bigelow and Andrew D. White were 
Ministers Plenipotentiary, and Bret Harte and W. D. Howells 
combined the pursuit of literature with the performance of 
consular duties at Glasgow and Venice, will be reproduced in 
kind if not in degree. Ambassadorships and Legations for 
successful writers and editors, humbler consular posts for 
writers who still have to make their way, might render the 
files of our State Department a treasure-house for the future 
student of American literature." 



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August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



CASA DEL REY NEWS. 

Some of the greatest swimmers in the world, headed by the 
great Duke Kahanamoku, have been at the Casa del Rey for 
the past three days, and probably one of the greatest half-mile 
races ever held on the coast was witnessed by the thousands 
of spectators who crowded the Casino, boardwalk, beach and 
pleasure pier, when the Hawaiian champion of the world beat 
Walter Pomeroy of the Olympic Club by about two or three 
yards. Pomeroy is to be given great credit for the wonderful 
swim he made, as he set the pace almost every foot of the way. 
Duke went into the tank in the natatorium the same evening 
and broke the world's record for fifty yards, swimming the 
distance in twenty-three and one-fifth seconds. 

After the swimming performance Sunday evening, Mr. Wal- 
ter Martin gave a supper in the Casino. His guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. M. H. de Young, the Misses Kathleen and Phyllis de 
Young, Miss Edith Rucker, Miss Dorothy Deane and Mr. Chas. 
de Young. 

Miss Elinor Tay of Palo Alto, the Misses Violet and Melba 
Cook of San' Francisco, and the Misses Adeline, Edith and 
Florence Bogart of San Jose are making quite a name for 
themselves as expert swimmers, and think nothing at all of 
swimming around C. C. Moore's yacht, which is anchored 
three-eighths of a mile from shore, making the round trip of 
three quarters of a mile. 

Mrs. Louise Harvey and Mrs. Nellie Harvey of San Fran- 
cisco are at Casa del Rey, and intend staying for the rest of 
the season. Mrs. Louise Harvey, who had never played golf 
before coming to Santa Cruz, became interested in the game, 
placed herself in the hands of Jim Smith, the professional 
golfer, and bids fair to become a good player, having a natural 
swing and one of the best teachers in the country. 



PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL NOTES 
Mrs. Wm. Gray and daughter, Miss Frances, wife and 
daughter of Win. Gray, General Freight Agent of the C. B. & Q. 
at St. Louis, have taken apartments for the summer, and with 
Mrs. L. W. Davies and Misses Helen and Dorothy are enjoying 
every minute of the time motoring, swimming or playing tennis. 
Other out of the State guests are Mrs. F. H. Portas of 
Chicago, J. F. Moyem and wife of Chicago, Mrs. W. O. Martin 
and auto party from Reno, Nevada, the Misses L. S. and E. F. 
Briggs of Boston, W. H. Saxton of Cleveland, Miss R. T. Ander- 
son of Toledo, Louise W. Brooks and C. C. Marble of New 
York, Miss Sarah Tabor of New Bedford, Mr. and Mrs. W. V. 
McQuaid of St. Paul accompained by Mrs. P. B. Lessing of Des 
Moines and Mrs. E. D. Frasier of Los Angeles, Miss S. Lane 
gf New York, Edith M. Dabb and Clara B, Hyde of New York, 
Jessie Kennard Ryder of Denver with the Mioses Alice W. and 
Heba C. Porterfield of Berkeley, chaperoned by Mrs. J. B. 
Kennard of Los Angeles, in their Lozier car, and Mr. and 
Mrs. W. F. Evans and daughter, Miss Sara Evans of Brooklyn. 
The weekly dances at the hotel are attracting so much atten- 
tion and so many are attending that it taxes the capacity of the 
large dinning room. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE NOTES 
Salmon fishing in the new Del Monte launch has been the 
principal diversion of the guests at Del Monte, outside of golf, 
which always reigns supreme. The best catch of the week was 
150 pounds of salmon and one big shark, which was almost 
landed. This was hooked by Mr. A. N. Rosenbaum and was 
brought up to the edge of the boat several times, but proved 
too large and unwieldy a body to handle. 

While Del Monte is in the summer essentially the playground 
of Californians, the registry shows that there are always many 
Eastern visitors and globe trotters from abroad visiting this 
beautiful place. 

A jolly motor party from the southland registered at Del 
Monte on a tour of California was that of Mr.;. S. W. McConnell 
and three daughters and E. Bates McConnell, all of Pasadena. 
Mr. Judah Newman is now a regular commuter between Del 
Monte and San Francisco, his family having taken apartments 
lor the summer. Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Swanton motored over 
trom Santa Cruz Saturday for a few days, and have as their 
guests Mrs. Jas. McNeal and Mrs. M. Thompson. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gus Lior. and Miss Hortense Lion of San Jose are at Del Monte 
for a few days, having motored down last Saturday. 



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San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 




PL/E/ASURD'S WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Bessie Barriscale in "Mrs. Dot" at the Alcazar. 

In my humble estimation, Bessie Barriscale scores the great- 
est success of her long Alcazar career in this play. Formerly 
used as a starring medium by Billee Burke, it can easily be 
imagined that the role would be an unusual one. I did not 
have the pleasure of witnessing Miss Burke as "Mrs. Dot," but 
after seeing our own Bessie Barriscale in the same part, I 
cannot imagine how Miss Burke could make as much of the 
role as Miss Barriscale. Anybody who is skeptical should 
meander to the Alcazar this week, and you will agree with me 
that Miss Barriscale is simply a whirlwind of delight in her 
role. I am given to understand that she did the part down in 
Los Angeles a year or two ago, and this was of material aid, 
as the part is a very long one. She makes the part irresistible, 
and when, in the first act, she clenches her hands and vows she 
is going to marry the man she loves even if he is engaged to 
another girl, you know almost intuitively that she will keep her 
word. Written by W. Somerset Maugham, the play is essen- 
tially English, and the first act moves somewhat languidly, but 
the second act is very brisk, and the third act is full of move- 
ment and action. It is all pure comedy written in a straight- 
forward manner, and the story is light and effervescent, and 
concerns a young and very charming widow who has a large 
income, and is in love with a man of no income but plenty of 
prospects, and the man, though loving the young widow, under 
the influence of a moony moon, made love to a pretty girl, and 
before the influence of the spoony moon had a chance to wear 
off, he had proposed to her. Naturally, he is sorry for his 
foolish bargain, but like a gentleman, he resolves to stick by 
his promise, until the fond mother discovers his means are 
limited, and she is about to dissolve the engagement when word 
comes that the young man is elevated to the peerage by the 
sudden death of a near relative, so the aforesaid fond mother, 
of course, is determined that the young lord must marry her 
daughter as he promised. The plot then revolves about the 
efforts of the charming widow to make her younger rival fall 




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in love and elope with another chap, which in the end she suc- 
ceeds in doing. 

This affords Miss Barriscale an opportunity to romp around 
to her heart's content, and play the mischievous imp in a man- 
ner which is bound *o capture your susceptibilities and make 
you a willing captive. If the part had been written for Miss 
Barriscale, it could nof fi* her better. And in her several frocks 
she is a lovely picture, and of course the feminine contingent 
in the audience has a chance to stir up considerable comment 
in this direction. 

Second only to Miss Barriscale this week in popular and ar- 
tistic estimation is the performance of Blenkinsop by Howard 
Hickman. Together with his talented wife, they are the real 
backbone of the week's success. This clever actor is at his 
very best in a part which affords him ample scope, and he plays 
with a naturalness and ease which it becomes a pleasure to 
watch. Then there is Lois Meredith, a new ingenue, who scored 
heavily in a very good role. Miss Meredith was Modesty in 




The Bell Family, who will present an artistic musical offering next week at the Orphcum. 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




The feast in Nero's Palace. Scene from the eight-reel (Astor Theatre) photoplay, "Quo Vadis," at the Columbia Theatre. 



the original "Everywoman" company, and comes here with con- 
siderable experience. She is charming and petite, and very 
pretty; most important of all, she shows herself a very capable 
actress. Bert Wesner does an English servant in his usual in- 
imitable manner. Lee Millar and Roy Clements are very good 
in limited parts. Forrest Stanley shows decided improvement 
in every department of his work. Stanley is a mighty good 
actor, and will be even better when he learns to forget himself. 
Jerome Storm, a new juvenile man, appears r .o advantage, show- 
ing much promise. Anna McNaughton, a very clever character 
woman, deserves praise for a good performance of a limited 
role. The settings are fine, the second act in particular being 

a really fine picture. 

• • * 

Pantages Theatre. 

The vim and dash of this week's bill at Pantages should 
bring that theatre up another notch in the favor of San Francis- 
cans. Every act stands in a class by itself, and one or two can 
be said to be far in advance of the usual run of vaudeville. 
Fred Ardath, who is a whole show in himself, is back, and his 
appearance at each performance is a signal for a round of ap- 
plause which should gratify that inimitable light comedian. 
Another favorite on the bill is Will Armstrong with his com- 
pany, appearing in the former's own farce creation, "The New 
Expressman." Armstrong is undeniably clever, and as a pro- 
ducer of laughs he is not to be excelled. Olga Samaroff pre- 
sents a delightful musical offering in which she is assisted by 
two accomplished musicians. That wonderful boy cornetist, 
Willie Hamilton, is a prime favorite with the music lovers, and 
brings down the house with his splendid rendering of the old 
favorite, "My Rosary." Howard and Dolores present some- 
thing new in ragtime songs, and the Lester Brothers sustain 
their reputation as premier clowning comiques. Next week 
there is promised something really sensational, and judging by 
the fidelity with which the Pantages promises are kept, the 
patrons of the theatre will not be disappointed. 



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12 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 



"The Pirates of Penzance" at the Tiroli. 

We are slowly but surely acquiring all over again the Gilbert 
and Sullivan habit, and the Tivoli, with its fine revivals, is re- 
sponsible for this, and that the habit has become general so far 
as this city is concerned is amply testified by the ever-increas- 
ing audiences at this handsome play-house. It needed but "The 
Pirates of Penzance" to bring back a flood of memories, and 
we were in fancy trooping backwards a couple of decades, 
when the majority of the principals in the present revival were 
yet in their infancy. It does seem good to hear the old songs 
again, and in this particular opera we have some special inter- 
est on account of the fact that it was produced in this country 
before it was done in England, the exact date and place being 
New York on December 31, 1879, and was later brought out in 
London on April 3, 1880. I was chiefly interested this week 
as to what kind of a rendition the local operatic forces would 
give the opera. In all candor I confess to being highly pleased. 
I do not kno ,v whether it has been the result of the conscientious 
efforts of Stage Director Temple, or the earnest efforts of the 
principals md chorus, or both, but the fact remains that every- 
thing which the Tivoli organization has touched so far has been 
given wMi an earnestness and sincerity which has compelled 
admiration. Everybody on the stage seems to have but one 
idea in mind, and that is to give the audience the best there is 
in them. The foundation of the permanent organization has 
been well laid, and I am positive that the result will be salutary 
and effective as far as the future of this house is concerned. 

I was especially pleased this week with John R. Phillips, 
who, as Frederic, the pirate apprentice, gave us an idea of the 
stuff there is in him, and his voice, which heretofore has been 
under restraint, owing to a cold, this week comes out with much 
brilliancy and sweetness. If Phillips would only throw more 
zest and ginger into his work he will become a much sought 
after tenor, and good tenors are about the rarest birds in the 
musical aviary. Charles Galagher continues to be a delight in 
everything in which he appears. He is that rare combination, 
a good singer and a splendid actor. Henry Santrey has little 
to do this week, but his opportunity will come later. He has 
shown us the calibre of his work in a most satisfactory man- 
ner. Teddy Webb, as Major-General Stanley, is a quaint figure, 
and to all intents and purposes nobody in the Tivoli company is 
more at home in the Gilbert and Sullivan repertoire than is 
Teddy Webb. Pitkin has a limited opportunity, but is very 
good. Rena Vivienne we like better each succeeding week, and 
that she has a voice of urmsual beauty she shows us this week. 
She is a fixture with us now. and has proven herself a real artist. 
Sarah Edwards, as Ruth, comes forward with a performance 
which is unusual in many ways, and her singing is always a 
pleasure to listen to. The chorus is being constantly im- 
proved, and the blending of voices becomes more harmonious 
and musical each week, for which no doubt thanks are due to 
Musical Director Linne. This slender and high-tensioned 
chap throws much vigor and energy into his baton, and his per- 
sonality is such as to inspire confidence. The two settings 
are beautiful. Next week there will be a final revival of "The 
Mikado" and of "Pinafore," and then we shall bid good-bye 
to Gilbert and Sullivan for some time. It has been a treat 
while it has lasted. Fine houses are in evidence, and this is 
gratifying. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum announces for next week a great 
new vaudeville show, with six entirely new acts. The Bell 
Family, brothers and sisters, nine in number, and hailing from 
Mexico, will present a complete novelty in the shape of an ar- 
tistic musical offering. The triple trio play skillfully on a 
number of instruments, but it is as bell ringers that they achieve 
their greatest triumph. They also sing Mexican songs and in- 
troduce their national dances. The setting of their act is very 
picturesque. 

Taylor Holmes, late star of "The Million," will share the 
headline honors. He will present a sparkling monologue rich 
in original humor. 

Angela Keir, supported by Frederick Montague, Carl Hart- 
berg and Frank Phelps, will present a sketch entitled "Sen- 
tence Suspended," which is the dramatization of an extraordi- 
nary and thrilling incident which actually occurred in a Phila- 
delphia law court. 



An appealing act of vocal and instrumental music will be 
offered by Fred Hamill and Charley Abbate as "The Singer 
and the Violinist." 

Harry Divine and Belle Williams will drum their way into 
• the good graces of the audiences in their successful vehicle, 
"The Traveling Salesman and the Female Drummer." 

A special additional feature will be the Rose Valerio Sextette 
—four girls and two men who do all kinds of marvelous feats 
on the taut wire. 

Next week will be the last of Fred Watson and Rena Santos, 

and Gus Edwards' Kid Kabaret. 

* * * 

Columbia Theatre. — The most amazing achievement in the 
photo drama world is George Kleine's production of the mar- 
velous Cines picture, "Quo Vadis," arranged in eight parts 
and subdivided into three acts with eight minutes intermission 
between each act. Special music was composed to fit the sub- 
ject, and is rendered on the organ by the most talented musi- 
cians that can be obtained. The artistic note is carried out in 
detail, and it is not to be wondered at that Mr. Kleine's pro- 
duction created such a sensation at the Astor Theatre in New 
York City, in Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, and everywhere 
else it has been presented. Mr. Kleine's "Quo Vadis" will be 
the attraction at the Columbia Theatre on Sunday, August 3d, 
for three weeks, with matinees daily. 

The final presentation of the Kinemacolor pictures at the 
Columbia Theatre will be given this Saturday night. The 
"Nathan Hale," "Everyman" and "Steam" special features are 

. exceptionally fine. 

• * » 

Pantages Theatre. — Emma Carus, one of the brightest stars 
that has twinkled on Broadway in several years, is the topliner 
on the new bill at the Pantages opening Sunday afternoon. Miss 
Carus is undeniably the "Queen of Singing Comediennes," 
which title she has held without contradiction for the past ten 
years. A production which is expected to cause comment is 
a musical farce adaptation of the much-discussed French paint- 
ing, "September Morn." Ed. Armstrong, of the Armstrong 
musical comedy company, has gathered twelve beautiful girls 
for the act, which is replete with refreshing jollity. Alfred 
Latell, known to vaudevillians as "America's foremost animal 
delineator," will present his little offering, assisted by Elsie 
Vokes. Latell was the original "Tige" in "Buster Brown." 
Hill, Cherry and Hill are comedians a-wheel, who ride a com- 
bination of cycles some twenty feet high and a couple barely 
reaching the floor. A melange of comedy burlesque and trav- 
esty on grand opera will be presented by Nichols, and the Croix 
Sisters in "A Tank Town Manager." "El Cota, a skillful xylo- 
phonist, has a selection of the tuniest rags. Lester Raymond, 
a young San Franciscan, will make his first appearance here 
in two years with a novelty juggling act. A couple of good com- 
edy pictures complete the bill. 

* * * 

Alcazar Theatre. — "Hawthorne of the U. S. A.," which is 
to be given its first presentation in the West next Monday even- 
ing and throughout the week at the Alcazar, is heralded as "a 
play with a smash." In the Alcazar's cast will be Forrest Stan- 
ley, Bessie Barriscale, Howard Hickman, the entire stock com- 
pany, and about a score of extra people. As all the scenes are 
laid in the Balkans, picturesque staging is assured. 

Anthony Hamilton Hawthorne, the story goes, is a young 
American who wins $100,000 at Monte Carlo, and with the 
money in a suitcase, starts on a motoring tour through the pres- 
ent seat of war in Europe. He reaches the bankrupt State 
of Borrowvina, and meeting Princess Irma Augusta Elizabeth 
Oyeritch, falls in love with her. The latter is daughter to the 
King, who seeks to have her marry Prince Vladimir, a scamp, 
and a pretender to the throne. Hawthorne disrupts Vladimir's 
plans, quells the revolution, and employs his $100,000 to re- 
habilitate the national finances. Then he prepares to return to 
America, but the King informs him that the kingdom is about 
to be transformed in*o a republic. It is needless to say that 
Hawthorne's homeward voyage is postponed, as the Princess 
will soon lose her title and become his social equal. 

• • * 

Tivoli. — Manager Leahy, of the Tivoli, has decided to repeat 
Gilbert and Sullivan's famous operas next week. "The Mikado" 
will be given Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday even- 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



ings and Sunday matinee. "Pinafore" on Thursday, Friday. 
Saturday evenings and Saturday matinee. The Gilbert and 
Sullivan revivals at the Tivoli are the talk of the town, and 
justly so. The excellent singing company and chorus, the beau- 
tiful scenery and costumes all go to make an organization that 
is hard to equal. 



Columbia Theatre 

Qottfob, Mar: i Co,, Ma 



i i fears and Mason I reel 
Phone Franklin ISO 

The Leading Plas house 



n> i HME in nil- i ii t, i ominenclns with SUNDAY MATINEE Al Rl i 

Id Ma Dailj al 2:80 Eve rsat ft :80. Direct fr lie Utor Theatre 

WW York, Qeorge Klelne 01 -mis The Sublime Eighi Reel i'hoto-dramfl 

"QUO VAD1S" 

Tin I ini\ \ui ii irlxed Version smis - c i Oc 



iiiiinrii street 



Kohler & Chase Hall. — Kohler & Chase have every reason ~~~ " 
to feel gratified with the success achieved by their summer KjT'DlieWY) I 
series of matinee musicales, as the attendance is steadily keep- 
ing up the average number of visitors. Tc-day (Saturday) Miss 
Cecil Cowles, pianist, will be the soloist. She is an unusually 
brilliant pianist of exceedingly fine technical and artistic skill, 
and an acknowledged composer. The compositions to be in- 
terpreted by Miss Cowles will be a Persian Dance and a Con- 
cert Waltz. Care has been taken to keep the instrumental sec- 
tion of the program, which is to be representative of the art 
of the player piano and the pipe organ, in a high musical at- ■ 

mosphere. The works to be interpreted on these instruments laTltCLOeS' Theatre 
will include several of the gems of musical literature. 



Bet. Stockton and Powell 

Phone i flas 70 

Safest and Mosl Magniflrent Theater In A rfta 

Week beginning ihis Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ANOTHER GREAT NEW SHOW 
THE BELL FAMILY, Nine Brother! and Sisters In an Artistic Musical 

Offering: TAYLOR HOLMES, Late Slur of "The Milli " ROSE VALERIO 

RKXTETTE, "The Sp I Fiends" on n Turn Wire: DIVINE cS wn.i i .wis 

"The Traveling Salesman and the Female Drummer:" FRED HAMILL 4 
CHARLEY ABBATE, "The Singer and the Violinist;" VNGELA KEIR 
S CO. in "Sentence Suspended:" FRED WATSON ,t RENA SANTOS: 
ORPHEIIM MOTION PICTURES Showing ( urrenl Events; Last Week Gl S 
KI'H Alius KID KABARET. 

Evening prices — 10e.. 25c. 50c, 75c. Box seats. $1. Matinee 
prices (except Sundays and holidays), 10c. 25c. 50c 

Market Street opposite Mason 



Arrangements have about been completed for the great 

gathering of Uncle Sam's Letter Carriers, which will conver.e 
in their Nineteenth Convention in this city from August 30th to 
September 4th. One of the main features of the visit of the 
"postmen" will be the great parade of two hundred and fifty 
automobiles which is scheduled to take place on Wednesday, 
September 3d. The tour will start from the Native Sons' Hall, 
and the route from there is to be through Golden Gate Park, 
Ocean Drive, Presidio and Exposition Grounds, returning to 
the starting point by way of the business section of the city. 
The entertainment of the hundreds of Carriers who will be in 
attendance at the convention will be looked after by Thomas 
McKeever, Thomas Tierney, Conrad Trieber and W. J. Hane- 
kamp, the latter having full charge of the automobile tour. It 
is the intention of the committee to make the coming convention 
one of the most successful in the history of the National Asso- 
ciation, and as representatives will be in attendance from every 
part of the United States, the local association is anxious to 
create as favorable an impression as possible, and to acquaint 
their brothers with the many things which help to make San 
Francisco one of the best places in the world. The local boys 
have already earned an enviable reputation as entertainers, and 
there is no doubt but that they will be able to make the visiting 
members feel entirely at home, in love with the city, and glad 
they came. 



The splendid automobile roads leading to that popular 

resort, Tallac, at Lake Tahoe, have done much to add to the 
pleasure of the people of the State, and as -i result, the guests 
at the end of July totaled more than three hundred representa- 
tive of every section of California. More than a score of th-3 
Tallac guests are from the Middle West and the East, and the 
ideal weather and lovely drives and scenery of and around 
Lake Tahoe haVe won them as warm admirers of California. 
This season has been even better than former ones in the num- 
ber of outside visitors to the different summer resorts, and none 
have fared better in this respect than has Tallac. 



With the rush of home-seekers into San Francisco in- 
creasing daily, the demand for homes is increasing. The firm 
of Hayes-Brown Realty Company, in the Westbank Building, 
which makes a specialty of filling such demands, reports great 
activity in business and much satisfaction in the fact that they 
inaugurated their present system of conducting business at the 
opportune time. The system employed is that of personally in- 
specting all properties, homes and flats before placing them 
upon their lists in order that they may feel secure in recom- 
mending them to their clients. In this way they find that they 
are able to please, and the result is a valuable asset in the way 
of advertising their reliability. AitcriiscmrDti 



BLANCO'S 



OTarrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No viaitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



Week Starting Sunday Matinee, Augusl 8(3 

Broad was 's Brightest Star 
EMMA CARUS 

"Queen of Singing Comediennes' 1 

A Musical Conception of 
"SEPTEMBER MORN" 

1'2 Dazzling Bathing Maids 

6 other Pantages Acts 
Mntinee Daily at 2:S0j Nights at 7 : i . ■ and 9:15. Sundays and Holidays 
Matinees at. 1 :'M and :!;ffl. Nights Continuous From fi;80. 



Tivoli Opera-House 



Phone Sutter 4200 



Commencing August ith, One Week Only by Request, Gilbert & Sullivan's 
Famous Operas. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday, Sunday and Sunday Matinee 

"THE MIKADO" 
Thursday, Friday. Saturday and Saturday Matinee 

" PINAFORE" 
Splendid Cast, Big singing chorus. Tivoli Orchestra. 

"The Gilbert and Sullivan revivals at the Tivoli are the talk of the town." 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
POPULAR PRICES— £Rc, 60c, and 75c, Box Seats Si. 00 

Alcazar Theatre °' Farre \:™r;r 

Monday Evening, Augusi I, and Throughoul the Week 
BESSIE BARRISCALE 
FORREST STANLEY 
Howard Hickman and the Alcazar Companj in Jamas Bernard Fbj 

Stirring Play of Adventure in the Balkans 

"HAWTHORNE OF THE U. S. A. " 
Its First Time in West. 

Prices — Nights, 25c. to $1; matinees, 25c. to 60c. Matinee Thura 
day Saturday, Sunday. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



TO OUR PATRONS 



We have made arrangements to have a variety of special 
cooked Entrees and Roasts which will be ready for immediate 
service between the hours of 5 P. M. to 8:30 P. M. every evening 
at the same popular prices as Luncheon. 

Regular Dinner with Red or White Wine $1.00. 

Best of Music and Entertainment every evening. 



Jules Restaurant 



Monadnock Building 



Sutter 1672 
Horn* C 3970 
Home C 4781 . Hotel 



Cyril Arnantor. 
Henry Ktttman 
C. Lnhederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 

RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the Cltv with Wine. St. cm. Banquet Halli anJ Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Ev#ry Evening. 
362 Geary Street San Francisco 



J B Pon 



J. Bertri 



C. Mailbebuau 



C. Lalaane 



L. Coii lard 



bERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTMNMRNT EVERY EVENING 
114-41] Bo«h Si . «•« Franritm ■ »h*>»» Reaniy) Fichaaer DoorUt 2411 



Gouraud's Orients 1 Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely pei fumed powdered leaves to 
carry in the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion Sent for 10 cents In stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
Wins 37 Great Jones St.. N. Y. ' 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 




There are, speaking collectively, mixed feelings at the Fran- 
cisca and the Town and Country Clubs. Visions of a regal 
clubhouse built by a new club formed by amalgamating the two 
have gone a-glimmering. No outsider can realize how deep was 
the feeling between the "Annexationists" and the "Independ- 
ents." Both Town and Country, in its Union Square home, and 
Francisca, in its handsome Sutter street quarters, have member- 
ship lists each name of which is guaranteed under the Blue- 
Blood Law. Either's members could object to the other's per- 
sonnel on no social grounds. The objection would have to be 
some petty personal one. So it was natural that many of the 
officers and members of each felt it would be possible to join 
their dues and their financial ratings without either one's losing 
anything by the combination, and thus make possible an official 
residence that could vie with the Pacific-Union in equipment 
and comfort. But, despite the presumed functions of mere 
exclusive hostelry, there were many women to whom their es- 
pecial club had become a sort of second home, an expression 
of their own individuality, which seemed threatened by the sug- 
gested combination. It was this feeling that prompted the turn- 
ing down of the plan. 

© © © 
They're having great fun down at Burlingame, planning for 
the "Harvest Moon Fete," which is to take place on the 30th of 
\l:gust. Just the fact that Mrs. Lansing Kellogg is to appear 
in costume and take a prominent part is assurance enough that 
there will be clever doings. We haven't of late been treated 
to the mischievous conceptions with which Mrs. Kellogg in 
her girlhood days often surprised us. She has a rich and ingen- 
ious imagination, and her contribution to the fun and origi- 
nality of the "Festival of Merrie Olde England" is sure to be 
something worth going to see. Among the others who will have 
part in the vaudeville which is to take place among the pic- 
turesque bazars of the fete, are clever Mrs. Joe Tobin and 
Marian Newhall. 

© © © 
That our brilliant Willis Polk has found new fields to con- 
quer in the Old World cannot but give us all a thrill of family 
pride. Willis, it is rumored, is to restore the historic old Irish 
castle, Muckross Abbey, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rose 
Vincent (Maud Bourn). Of course the wonderful old abbey is 
delightfully habitable, as it is, and has recently housed the 
Polks as well as Mrs. Vincent's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Bourn, in great comfort. But like all very antiquated things, 
it needs a "going over," and it seems interesting, indeed, that 
a Californian should be the one asked to lay eager Western 
hands on this great mass of ancient traditions. That the Old 
World should come to recognize that the new has not only the 
genius to construct the practical, as best exemplified in our 
Canal, but that it has artists capable of handling with proper 
feeling the sacred architectural relics of other ages, may in time 
lead to such notices as "William Presidio Heights has gone 
abroad for six months to make some changes in the Sistine 
Chapel, after which he will cross the Channel to complete his 
additions to Westminster Abbey." 

© © © 
Most interesting reports are coming back from the Temple- 
ton Crockers, of the rare bits of beauty they have picked up for 
their new home. While they are on the other side, ostensibly 
to motor through the South, these fortunate young people have 
had their eyes out for the rare and unusual for their California 
mansion. 

© © © 

The McCloud River Country seems to have become a popu- 
lar haven for honeymooners. Here young folk really can 
wander under the stars, hand in hand, safe from the prying 
eyes of the outside world. Horace Hill, Jr., and his pretty bride 
(Jeanne Gallois), have sought this wild but beautiful retreat - 



for their honeymoon. It was to the McCloud Country Club that 
Jennie Crocker and her handsome husband Malcolm Whitman, 
retreated from the limelight after their marriage at San Mateo. 
© © © 
'Tis said those fortunate young folk, the Hiram Johnsons, 
have purchased the famous Jenks home on Russian Hill. Mrs. 
Johnson, who was Miss Bowles, was promised a home as her 
father's gift. The young people bought a lot on the very top 
of Russian Hill, but the land was so dear that, after they had 
it and began to count up the cost of putting a house on it, it 
ran way above what father had intended. So they say he did 
what the typical indulgent American father always does under 
those circumstances. He said : "If it's going to cost that much, 
we may as well spend more, and have something just right! 

Let's have the Jenks castle!" 

© © © 

With the departure of Secretary and Mrs. Daniels, Mars re- 
mains in the ascendant over our city, and the Service people are 
having a continuous gala time. These are the days when those 
of our social leaders who have been nice to the Presidio and 
Mare Island sets are reaping their reward. Secretary of War 
Garrison, accompanied by General Leonard Wood and an array 
of uniformed celebrities, have occupied our attention for the 
week. The brief visit has been one of hustle, and our grand 
dames have had a busy time trying to squeeze in entertain- 
ments for the distinguished Easterners. To capture them for 
iionization has required acute military as well as social diplo- 
macy. Similar effort was put forth long ago when that greatest 
of British bachelors, Lord Kitchener, was in our midst, intent 
on inspecting our harbor. 

© © © 

It all sounds very wonderful, this new plan for the St. 
Francis! No well-dressed woman ever minds passing down a 
parade-line, and the promise that there is to be an extended 
"Peacock Alley" from Geary street to Post is a matter of secret 
satisfaction to the most serene buds and belles, while the idea 
of having the present dining room turned into a part of the 
lobby, where one may have afternoon tea served quite suits 
the feminine imagination. It's always more fun to have tea 
where you can watch the human stream flow by. 
© © © 

Numbers of the socially elect have been "doing" the Rodeo 
this week at Salinas. Many have stayed at Del Monte, and 
motored over, and others have stopped at the little town of 
Salinas itself, in order not to miss any of the excitement. The 
Robert Hayes Smiths, Anna Peters and her mother, the George 
Camerons, and many others, have taken in the broncho busting 
exhibitions, while the Hillsborough riding coterie have in many 
cases altered summer plans to witness this typical Western 
method of handling the horse. While most of our Hillsborough, 
Menlo and Claremont horsewomen affect the European style, 
there are always secrets to be learned from the rough-riders, 
which secrets can be adapted to the "better-form saddle." For 
instance, there is a touch of Western nonchalance to the horse- 



BLACK & WHITE 



SCOTCH WHISKY 
The Highest Standard of Quality 



ALEX D. SHAW & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

214 Front St., San Francisco 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



manship of Mrs. Robin Hayne, and the daring Eleonoro Sears 
was not averse to using her bridle a bit differently after she 
had been with California-bred riders. 
-'.- © © 

The early arrival from Europe of the Peter Martins will be 
the signal for much entertaining. Walter Martin went on to 
meet them in New York. The possibility of Mrs. Peter's beau- 
tiful sister, Mrs. Thomas of Newport, coming out here in the 
autumn, lends additional interest in the return of these Cali- 
fornians. Peter Martin's unusual interest in good literature, 
and his wide reading, mark him to Europeans as rather an ex- 
ception to their notion of an American gentleman. 
@ © ffi 

There seems to be something about the California air that 
breeds tennis players. While McLoughlin was winning laurels 
in the East and Europe, we find young Horace Blanchard Chase 
qualifying to succeed to his father's former honors as a racket- 
wielder by winning with Horace, Sr., both cups offered at the 
Castle Crags tournament. Malcolm Whitman, the noted tennis 
champion, before he married Jennie Crocker, has been quoted 
as saying that he could play a better game in the California at- 
mosphere than anywhere. But later he carried East with him, 
as his bride, his chief Western inspiration. 



SOCIAL DOINGS AT CASTLE CRAGS 

The Horace Chases, Captain and Mrs. Fletcher, U. S. A., 
Cuyler Lees, Merrills, Morgans, Havens, Campbells and Kin- 
neys enjoyed a four-in-hand party to Dunsmuir Tuesday even- 
ing. The vaudeville performance at the Bijou was enjoyed, the 
party returning to Castle Crags about midnight. 

One of the chief forms of diversion at Castle Crags is horse- 
back riding. Thursday, the Misses Ysabel Chase, J. Campbell, 
K. Booth, N. Havens, K. Kinney, Messrs. Cuyler Lee, Smitten 
and Wheeler rode over to Castle Lake. Fishing was indulged 
in, and later the large catch was cooked in picnic style. 

Three o'clock is the popular "bathing hour" at Castle Crags. 

Mrs. Cuyler Lee won the trophy in the bowling contest at 
Castle Crags last Saturday evening. There were twenty en- 
tries, and a pleasant evening was experienced. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Wright, of Oakland, are spending their 
honeymoon at Castle Crags. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Whittle of Mill Valley, and Miss Alicia 
Morgan arrived at Castle Crags Friday. 

Miss Ethyl Crocker of Berkeley is registered at Castle Crags. 



WITTER SPRINGS NEWS. 

One of the most enjoyable of the summer diversions at Wit- 
ter Springs was the barbecue last Saturday, which was held in 
the woods surrounding the Hotel, and for which a number of 
prominent people of San Francisco motored up. In the evening 
there was a dance and card party in the hotel, the prize win- 
ners for the various sports of the afternoon and evening being 
Mrs. H. K. Defendorf, Miss Edna Walker, C. M. Birkholm and 
P. J. McDonald. Others who arrived last week were Mr. and 
Mrs. George P. Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Green, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gus A. Roos, Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Kaufmann, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
W. Leavitt, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Pedlar, Mrs. R. D. Quinlan, H. 
C. Clunie, Murray White. W. J. Winthrop, and G. R. Eaton. 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street in the center of the city. 
Take any Market Street Car from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully situated of any City Hotel 
in the world. 

Take the Sacramento Street Cars from the Ferry 
Two Great Hotels Under the Management of the 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

Tea served in Tapestry Room 
from four to six o'clock 

Special Music Fixed Price 

A DAILY SOCIAL EVENT 



HOTEL MONTGOMERY 



San Jose's Newest Hotel 



Fireproof 



Rates $1.00 and up 
F. J. McHENRY, Manager 



European Plan 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

THIRTEENTH AND HARRISON STREETS, Oakland, California 
Absolutely fireproof Class A construction. Erected 
at a cost of $2,000,000. Perfect service and un- 

surpassed cuisine. Afternoon tea from 4 until 

6 o'clock. Music. 

European plan only Tariff $1.50 per day up 

Under Management of VICTOR REITER 
Electric Bus Meets All Trains 




Scientific Treatment 
SCALP 
FACIAL 

MANICURING 
166 GEARY ST. 



Phone Douglas 977 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUTLER-NELKE 
ACADEMY OF DRAMATIC ART 

Alcazar Theatre Buildine 

MIRIAM NELKE - Director 

Dramatic Art, Elocution, Dialect, Literature, French, 

Fencing, Dancing and Make-up. Fall term begins Aug. 11th 



CASTLE CRAGS 



Under same management as Hotel Del Monte. 

On main Oregon automobile highway and S. P. R. R. 

In the yellow pine forests of the Upper Sacramento River. 

Wonderful summer climate; bright warm days and cool nights. 

Beautiful trails through the shady forests for pedestrians or 

riding parties. 

Plenty of gentle horses and good guides. 
Automobiles for hire. 



The motor ride through 20,000 acres of virgin yellow pine 
forests is unequaled in California. 

Arrange your motor trips so as to stop over at CASTLE 
CRAGS for a day or two. Garage for automobiles; 
gasoline and oils. 

Rates: $18 to $24 per week. 

For beautifully illustrated folder and reservations, address, 
MANAGER, CASTLE CRAGS, CALIFORNIA. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 
i IEMING-GEARY. — Ernest Geary is receiving congratulations on his 

engagement to Miss Dorothy Deming of Santa Cruz, the daughter 

of Mr. and Mrs. H. S.-Deming. 
MacCHESNEY- ANDERSON.— The engagement of Miss Martha MacChes- 

ney and Ensign Milton Anderson is announced. The marriage will 

probably take place this fall. Miss MacChesnoy is the daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. MacChesney of Hondlulu. 
McLAUGHLIN-MOUSER.— Announcement Is made of the engagement of 

Ernest Mo user of Berkeley and Miss Alberta Muriel Me Laugh I in of 

San Francisco, The wedding will lake place in September. 
NOTTINGHAM-HUNTER.— Mr. and Mrs, Wellington Nottingham, of 

Oakland, announce bhe engagement ol their daughter, Miss Prancesca 

Wyoming Nottingham, to Harvey S. Hunter of this city. 
O'CONNOR- HENSHAAA'.— An engagement that created interest when 

announced here this week is that of Miss Irene Patricia O'Connor of 

Oakland ami Tyler Henshaw. 
REED-WING. — Mrs. Arthur R. Reed, of Lexington. Mass.. announces the 

engagement of her daughter, Miss Martha Reed, to Robert L. Wing. 
t'PSHUR-SPERRY. — The engagement of Miss Gertrude Upshur, the 

daughter of Mrs. J. Upshur of Astoria, and Lieutenant Simon Willard 

Sperry, second son of tin- late James W. and Mrs. Sperry, of Satisalito, 

is announced. There is no definite date for the marriage. Mr. 

Sp Try is a s :ion of o le of the oldest families of the State. 
WOO! MAN-BAXTER-GOUL.D. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Woodman, of First 

avenue, -inn. mine tin engagement of their daughter, Miss Katherine 

Francis Woodman, to William A. Baxter-Gould, of London, England. 

The wedding will take place in the early part of October. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
BUTTERS-TEA< tUE. — The mai riage of .Miss Marguerite Butters and 

Charles M. Teague : ^ sel foi Thursday, August 14th. 
CRAWFORD -WHITE. — Another home wedding this week will be that of 
Miss Eliza Lee Crawford, daughter of Mis. John Crawford of Plaza 
Drive, and Howard J, White. Only relatives are to be present. 
FORBES -CUMMJNGS. — The marriage of Miss Georgia Mae Forbes and 
Mr. Earl Russell Cummings is announced, the ceremony having taken 
place last Thursday at the home d*f the bride's sister, Mrs. H. P. 
Pratt, in Oakland. 
i;Lc m >i;-H1LLEGAS.— Miss Gloor and I i r . Hillegas, whose engagement 

was announced some tire- ago, will he married this spring. 
IIKSS-Mc-PEAK.— Th- wedding 01 Miss Ella Hess, the daughter of the 
late Frederick Hess, md John McPeak, of Los Angeles, will take place 
at the home of the bride-elect in California street on August 11th. 
LEACOCK-HIL.LER.— An interesting wedding i»f the late fall will he that 
of Herman Frankiin Miller and Miss Marie Leacock of Berkeley. No 
definite arrangements have been made for the wedding. 
McCRAITH-RABJOHN.- -August 29th is the date named for the marriage 
of Miss Lois McCraith and Lloyd Rabjohn. The former is a member 
of Las Amistades < Hub. 
NESFIELD- PLANT. — Formal arrangements have been made for the 
marriage of Miss Helen C. Nesfield and Mr. Thomas Garret Plant on 
the evening of August 2d at the home of Mrs. D. W. Nesfield, "Rose- 
bank," Sausa lit" 
PETERSON -FULLER. Miss [na D. Peterson of this city and Raymond 
Fuller of Los Angeles have set the date for their marriage for August 
' the 13 th. 
VAN MATER-SHEDD Th< wedding of Miss Gladys Hadwin Van Mater 
and Clarence Prouty Shedd is t" take place August 1st at the Van 
Mate]- hon e mi Berkeli 

WEDDINGS. 
AXTELL-GORDON. — The marriage of Miss Vivian Maude Axtell to Bon- 
ne,- J. Gordon was celebrated alst week at St. John's Episcopal Church. 
'fin Reverend Mr. Benson officiated. 
CUSHMAN -HARVEY.— Mrs. Helen D. Cushman announces the marriage 
ni her daughter, Elizabeth Irene, to Mr. Melville G. Harvey, on Thurs- 
day evening, July 31st. 
ELLIS-BRADDOCK. — Miss Sadie Ellis announces the marriage of her 
sister, Bertha, to Grover B. Braddock, on July 1-i, 1913. 
LUNCHEONS. 
I >AYIS.— Mrs. Mary M. Davis was the guest of honor on her ninety-third 
birthday lust Friday at a luncheon given at the home of Mrs. T. E. J. 
Gardner, in Willard street. 
MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin was hostess at a luncheon at her home 
mi Lryadway this week, after which, with her guests she attended 
the reception at the St. Francis in honor of Secretary of the Navy 
and Mrs. Josephus Daniels. 

DINNERS. 
MAHONEY. — On Thursday evening last, the home of Mrs. Thomas 
Mahoney, in Lincoln Way, was the scene of a happy gathering when 
a home-coming dinner was given to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Ashe. 
PORTER.— Mr. and Mrs. 10. D. Porter, who are spending the summer at 
Del Monte, were host and hostess at a delightful dinner party there 
last Thursday evening. 
POTTER.— Mr. and Mrs. Milo Potter entertained at dinner twenty-four 
guests in the Moorish Room of the Hotel Potter Wednesday evening. 
July 30th. 



SUPPERS. 
CHAPPELAER. — Captain and Mrs. Chappelaer entertained a few friends 

at a supper party following the- bi-monthly hop at Fort Win field 

Scott last Friday evening. 

PARTIES. 
ABEND. — A welcome-home surprise party was giv»n to Mr. M. PI n- 

thal by Mr. J. Abend on Saturday evening, July 19th. at his resldeni e 

in Seymour avenue. 

CARDS. 
SMITH. — Mrs. W. H. Smith was hustess at an auction bridge party and 

tea in the Coronado Country Club, when she entertained more than 

a score of guests. 

TEAS. 
POORMAN. — Mrs, Samuel Poorman give a tea at the Palace Hotel to- day, 

assembling the friends of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Sherman lloyt. 

wife of Lieutenant Hoyt, who is here from Chicago on her first 

visit since her marriage. 
REYNOLDS. — Mrs. A. L. Reynolds was hostess at a matinee tea in honor 

of Miss Margaret Virginia Pitts and Miss Kathryn Ryan of Los 

Angeles, who left recently for Colorado Springs. 
ECHUMAN. — Mrs. Roland Schuman entertained at an infurmal tea Mon- 
day afternoon in the Palm Court of- the Palace Hotel, at which the 

guest of honor was Mrs. George Nea). wife of Lieutenant Neal. l T . S, N. 
DANCES. 
EYRE. — Miss Elena Eyre is to be the guest of honor at a dance to be 

given next week by her cousin. Miss Lee Girvin. at the home of her 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Girvin, in Menlo Park. 
SPRECKELS. — Mr. and Mrs. John D. Spreckels were the motifs for a 

dance given at Wonderland. Ocean Beach, near San Diego, by Mrs. 

Walter D. K. Gibson, Mrs. Spreckels' sister, last week. 
MOTORING. 
DE PUE. — Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J. de Pue. Miss Elva and Miss Correnafa de 

Pue and Mrs. Henry Crocker, Miss Marian, Miss Kate and Miss Mary 

Crocker make up a congenial party which will motor this week-end 

to Lake Tahoe to spend the next fortnight at Tahoe Tavern. 
HARRIS". — Mr. and Mrs. Larry Harris motored to Lake Tahoe during the 

week, and spent the week-end at the Tavern. 
HOWARD. — George H. Howard motored down to Del Monte this week, 

spending a few days there. 
ROLPH. — Mr. and Mrs. George Rolph and their two pretty daughters 

motored to Castle Crags last week. 
AVALLACE. — Dr. and Mrs. Lew E. Wallace, of San Francisco, motored 

with a party to the McCloud River country Wednesday. The Wallaces 

arrive! at Castle Crags Sunday. 

RECEPTIONS. 

FRIEDMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. I. Friedman of Bush street will hold a recep- 
tion for their silver anniversary wedding on Sunday afternoon. Au- 
gust 3, from 2 to 5 o'clock. 

MEEK. — A garden party and reception were given last Thursday after- 
noon by Mrs. W. E. Meek at her beautiful home, Edgemont, near 
!Ia> wards. 

ARRIVALS. 

BRAY. — Mrs. Robert Augustus Bray lias returned to her home In Oak- 
land afler an extended visit with Mrs Clinton Walker in her summer 
home in Plumas County. 

BRENNER. — Mr. and Mrs. Nat Brenner have returned to their apartments 
in Van Ness avenue. They spent the past month at Del Monte. 

BJORNSTADT. — Mrs. Alfred Bjornstadt, who arrived a few days ago 
from Europe, is the guest of her mother, Mrs. John I. Sabin, at the 
Sabin home at Mountain View. 

CROCKER.— William H. Crocker, Jr., and Averill Harrlman. who went to 
England to see the boating regatta at Henley, have returned. 

I iORE.— Mrs. E. Dore, Mrs. Ruby Pond and Miss Ruby Bond arrived 
Monday evening in this city, after an extended sojourn in Qurope, 

where .Miss Bond attended one of the fashionable seminaries. 
DOUGLAS.— Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Douglas and Mrs. Ursula Stone 
have tcturned fro in n. month's visit to the Santa Cruz Mountains, 

wher.' they occupied a cottage at a resort near Alma 

FBNNLMORE.— Mrs. W. D. Feiiniinmv and Mrs. II. J. Morton have re- 
turned from an extended sojourn in Alaska, and are again established 
in their homes in this city. 

FERNANDEZ.— Mrs. C. «'. Fernandez and her daughter, Mrs. Anita F. 

Sim lair, who recently spent three weeks at Shasta Springs, have re- 
turned to their home at Pinole. 
FOUTE.— Miss Augusta foute has returned to her home in this- city afb i 

a delightful week-end visit in San Mateo as the guest of Mr. and 

Mrs. Willard Chamberlin, 
GR3EN. — Dr. Louis D. Green, who has been abroad for many months, 

lias returned to the city. 
heynrmann.- Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Heynemann, who have been 

traveling in Europe r<>r several months, have returned to the!] home 
in this cily. 
KING.— Mr. and Mis. limner King and their daughters, Miss Cenevieve 
and Miss Hazei King, have returned to their bungalow in the Santa 
Cruz Mountains, after having Spent several days last week in San 
Francisco. 



Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene ^ayne. dentists, have resumed 

practlca at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 68. Hours: 9 to 4. 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



MttLLEB Mr. ind Mrs. C. G. VliUei have returned from their motor 
trip through Southern California, which Included stop n 
1 bara, Del I • . Loa Angeli - and C ironado. 

NKAi. -Mrs. George Meal, wlfi ul Lieutenant Neal, r. s. \\, has re- 
turned to this city, after having visited In Mave Island 

NEWLANDS. -Senator ind Mrs. Francis Newlunda have arrived from 
Washington to sp ad a U n days al the Fairn i. 

PRENTICE.- Mr. and Mrs. tidward Huntington Prentice, who have been 
In Id'urope for some time, have returned and are al tin Hotel Bellevue 

REID, -Miss Vesta Eteid and Miss Elizabeth Bull have returned to their 
hoi es in San Francisco after a week-end visit In Ross Valley as the 
guests ol .Miss F/nez and Miss Zephyi Pitchel. 

ROLPH.- Mayor and .Mis, Rolph have returned from Paso Robles, where 
they have i een spen ling the Last three weeks. 

SETSSIGNS.— Mr. and Mrs ; ». Sessions and their daughter, Miss Jeanette 
Sessions, have returned from an extended trip through Alaska and 
British Columbia.. 

TALBOT.— Mr. and Mrs, William il. Talbot, who have been In Seattle, 
have returned to their home in Burllngame. 

WEILL.— Raphael Weill, who has been abroad for several months, re- 
turned from Paris during the week. 

"WHITE. — Mr.* and Mrs. Ralston White have returned to California after 
an absence of two or three months in the East. 

WHITE. — Mr. and Mrs. Wiliard W. White have returned from Plumas 
and Lassen Counties, having made the trip both ways in their auto. 

DEPARTURES. 

BUCKNALL. — Mrs. George J. Bucknall and her granddaughter, Miss 
Desiree Marriott, left for Ben Lomond in the Santa Cruz Mountains 
recently, where they will enjoy a two-weeks' vacation. 

EAVES. — Dr. and Mrs. James Eaves have gone to Woodside, where they 
will pass the summer months. 

FLOOD. — Miss Cora Jane Flood has joined Mr. and Mrs. James Flood in 
Santa Barbara. 

HAVENS. — Mrs. Wickham Havens and Miss Sallie Havens have sailed 
for Honolulu for a several weeks' visit. 

HENRY. — Mrs. Kate Voorhies Henry and her daughter, Miss Robina, 
are leaving town to take up their residence in Berkeley. 

HENSHAW. — Griffith Henshaw and Harry Chickeriug have gone to Men- 
docino County for the month, and later on Mr. and Mrs. William G. 
Henshaw and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chickcring and Miss Florence Hen- 
shaw, who are now in Santa Barbara, will join them. 

MAUZY. — Mrs. Byron Mauzy, accompanied by Miss Marjorie and Miss 
Alice Mauzy and Mrs. M. R. Hebbard. make up a congenial party who 
are enjoying a few weeks at the Tahoe Tavern. 

MELYTN. — Judge and Mrs. Harry Melvin have gone to the Santa Cruz 
Mountains for a several weeks' stay, and are occupying a cottage at 
Brookdale. 

MOONKY. — Mr. and Mrs. S. V. Mooney are taking a brief vacation at 
El Pajaro Springs. 

MOORE. — Mrs. Pierre Moore and her brother, Willis Davis, went to Santa 
Barbara a few days ago. 

MURPHY. — Mrs. J. Murphy and Miss Bessie Murphy, and Mrs. A. Bonde 
and Miss Abbie May Bonde have arrived at the Hotel del Mai, where 
they will enjoy a brief outing. 

NIEBLING. — Miss Rhoda Niebling has gone to Tahoe to visit for several 
weeks with Mrs. James b'arrell and hor daughter, Miss Kathleen Par- 
rell, who are passing tie- sui er I here. 

NI'jWELL. — Mi\ and Mrs. Daniel Newell sailed on the Mongolia for a 
tour of the Orient this week, They will return in December, 

PETERSON.— Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Peterson of Alain. ',i;i have gone to their 
Mountain View ranch, where tliej are enjoying b briel vacal 

SCOTT.— Mrs. Cuy ScOtl and Mis. Maiy A. Huntington left this week 

for New York. 
WELCH,— Mrs, Andrew Welch and Miss Marie Kussell I .11 the 

i Eotel Pol ter last Sunday b fter a b] 

INTIMATIONS. 
CHAM BERLIN.— Mr. and Mi W berlln will spend next month 

at Santa Barbara. 
DARLING.— Mrs, Clara Hastings Darling will leave Borne time next 

month Eor a trip t>> [Europe, which will extend ovei siv months. 
Id-] I ,.\ MONT ANY A, Mr. and Mrs. Jacque 

ntng a trip tO 1 -i k< ■ 'tahoe. 

ci'",! 1 ;. Miss Lillian Gee and Misa Frances McKay, who have been spend- 
ing the sin i in i lonolulu, <■ ■ dm to 

class Mr. and Mrs. Prank Glass, of Martinez, are ■>' Bartlett Spi 

GOLCHER, Misa Catherine Golchei will leave on August 9th for Bui 
where she will continue her mueii A ster in 

Berlin. 

HART, -Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Harl M ■ te for the summer. 

JOLLIFFE, Hies Gertrude J In Paris by Mr. 

and U is i-i i ■ 

MAGNTN Mrs I Jdagnh Stephen S. Rau will be 

located In Marin Counl i ks. 

MARTIN Mi and Mrs ■'. Martin are expected t" arrive in New 

York soon, and will be Joined thert by Mr. and Mrs, Peter Martin 

and their young son, 

ROOSEVELT.- Mrs. It, the wife ol Major Roosevelt 

r. s. a . the M p '. will arrive this week from 

the Philippines 

SAWYER i ind Mrs. F W, Sawyei and faintly are it Del afoni 

an Indefinite staj 

STRONG Mi and Mrs g left last weak for their : 

in \, •,<, roik after a several months' visit in 

VON SCHRA1 »ER Mrs Frederick von Schrader, I . 

von E 



■ D, Major-Genera K Chiel of Staff ol the army, will arrive In 

! i I iming ni ii for a Bhorl 

A' RIGHT. Miss Helen C. Wright and her two brothers Harvi 

Edgrertorj Wright, are enjoying the pleasures oi Lake Tahoe. 
vol NG, Mrs. E B V'ouug, who hue been al Coronado tnosl ol the sum* 

tner, will oqn bi borne, making her plans after her arrival for a trip 

to Euro] i he wl ■■ 





MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEW ATE R 

Is a perfectly harmless eye remedy 

for strained, inflamed. Bore, watery 

painful, burning, smarting, blurring. 

itchy eyes; red, gluey or heavy lids; 

floating spots, injured eyes, indispensable for mechanics exposing their eyes 

to the wind, sun and dust. At druggists 50c; by mall 6f>c, direct from 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician and Optometrist 

960 Market St., San Francisco 

Charter Member of American Association of Opticians (Established 18 Years) 

Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers (a chemical cloth ), large size 3 for 25c 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

PHYSICIANS. 
Dr. w. P. Agnew has moved his office to this city, and Is now to be 

found In Room 424, Flood Building. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eamea tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m 2941 TVasnlngton street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St.. now at room 403 
Wustbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN E. i S-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and In- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg., 830 Market St. Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St., above Bush, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 601. 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 

Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and inspect motors. 

Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



nni ICUrC 623 Sacramento Street, between 
D n \J CD il L-. »0 Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning- Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Wit re. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

Have you not always some slight repairs? Stopped 

basins, broken window cords, electrical repair work ? 
We will assume all your repairs at a small monthly 
rate. Our representative will call at your request 

Phoenix Repair Company 

Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglas 822 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY. 
Let us guide you In your selections. 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers In 
The Hljhest PAPE R F ° r 0ffir * Statt ° n * r y 

Oatttry and Jackson St"-?*i %*- E>»RClSCO. f»l 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



J 



New York Stock Excfaiot* 
Members ■! ^ ew York CottoaJ£xcfctng« 



Chicaj o Board of Trade 

TV Stock and Bond Exchaoie. Sao Fraocitee 



Main Office 
MILLS BUILDING 

Saa FrancUco, California 



Braacb Offloee 

Lei Anjelei Sao Diego 
Coronado Beacb Portland. Ore. 
Seattle. Waib Vaoconver. B. C. 



UNITED STATES BRANCH STATEMENT OF THE CONDITIONS AND 
Affairs of the PALATINE INSURANCE CO., LTD., of London, Eng- 
land, on the 31st day of December, A. D. 1912, and for the year ending 
on that day. Published pursuant to the Provisions of Section 611 of 
the Political Code and compiled from the annual statement filed with 
the Insurance Commissioner of the State of California. 



Assets. 

Cash Market Value of all Stocks and Bonds owned by Com- 
pany $£ 

Cash in Banks 

Interest due and accrued 

Agents* Balances representing business. written subsequent to 
October 1. 1912 



,624,540.00 

204.369.17 

31.634.00 



TOTAL ASSETS ?3. 250,576.54 



Liabilities. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid 

Losses in process of Adjustment, or in Suspense 

Losses resisted, including expenses 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running one year or less, 

50 per cent : 

Unearned premiums on Fire Risks running more than one year, 

pro rata 1 

Estimated Taxes hereafter payable based upon this year's ■ 

business 

Commissions and Brokerage due or to become due 

Re-insurance Premiums and Return Premiums 

All other liabilities 



24,238.00 
99.529.68 
23,683.00 

628,332.41 

087,985.02 

35.061.62 
42,744.25 
48,045.46 
10,385.82 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $2,000,005.26 



Income. 

Net cash actually received for Fire premiums ?1,8jl4, 547.26 

Received from interest and dividends on Bonds, Stocks, Loans, 

and from all other sources 119,794.42 

Gross profit on sale or maturity of Ledger Assets 2,493.01 

Received from Home Office 2,628.21 



TOTAL INCOME $1,939,462.90 



Expenditures. 

Net amount paid for Fire Losses ? 947.431.87 

Expenses of adjustment and settlement of losses 25.377.17 

Paid or allowed for Commission or Brokerage 413,274.93 

Paid for Salaries, Fees, and other charges for officers, 

clerks, etc 125.494.67 

Paid for State, National and Local taxes 50,720.91 

Gross decrease in book value of Ledger Assets 12.S68.35 

Remitted to Home Office 7. 410.205.24 

All other Expenditures 96.502.90 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES $2,081,876.04 



Losses incurred during the year (FIRE) $956,513.12 



Premiums 

$2,756,044.07 

2,546,959.16 

3.272.640.15 



Risks and Premiums. 

Fire Risks 
Net amount of Risks written daring the year. .$250,528,193 
Net amount of Risks expired during the year. . . 224.583.881 

Net amount in force December 31, 1912 297.803,001 

A. H. WRAT, U. S. Manager. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of February, 1913. 
H. R. RAY, Notary Public. 

CO-PARTNERSHIP NOTICE. 

The undersigned, co-partners doing business in the City and County of 
Francisco, State of California, under the firm name and style of Charles 
Meinecke & Co., do hereby certify: 

That the names in full of all the members of such co-partnership and 
their places of residence, are as follows: 

EMIL P. MEINECKE, Trustee, University Club. San Francisco, Cal. 

HENRY KUNZ. 1720 San Antonio Avenue. Alameda, Cal. 

EMIL P. MEINECKE. Trustee. 
HENRY KUNZ. 
Dated this 1st day of July, A. D. 1913. 



State of California. 
County of Modoc — ss. 

On this 4th day of July in the year one thousand nine hundred and thir- 
teen A. D.. before me, C. H. Dunlap. a Notary Public in and for said 
County, residing therein, duly commissioned and sworn, personally ap- 
peared EMIL P. MEINECKE. Trustee, personally known to me to be the 
person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowl- 
edged to me that he executed the same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. 

(Seal) C. H. DUNLAP, 

Notary Public in and for the County of Modoc, State of California. 



State of California, 

City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

On this 1st day of July, in the year one thousand nine hundred and 
thirteen, before me, JAMES MASON, a Notary Public in and for said 
City and County, residing therein, duly commissioned and sworn, per- 
sonally appeared HENRY KUNZ. known to me to be the person de- 
scribed in. whose name is subscribed to, and who executed the within 
and annexed instrument, and he acknowledged to me that he executed the 
same. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed 
my official seal, at my office, in the said City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, the day and year last above written. 

(Seal) JAMES MASON. 

Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco. State of 

California. 






ITJNANCIALJ 



The market continues along the con- 
The New York servative lines which it adopted 

Stock Market. when the tariff and currency bills 

began to influence financial and 
commercial affairs. "Sell on bulges," is still the slogan of 
those brokers who furnish advice on market fluctuations. In 
addition, New York continues to be influenced by Europe. 
Financial centers there are still dominated by the Balkaa situa- 
tion, which has become more perplexing through the recent 
capture of Adrianople by the Turks, backed by Germany. The 
Balkan States have been heavy borrowers wherever they were 
able to raise funds, and Austria, Germany and France have 
been furnishing them money freely, especially France. The 
Balkan States are now practically bankrupt and scrapping 
among themselves, and the outlook for the repayment of these 
loans is slender and extremely remote. The combatants have 
fought themselves out, and in consequence a somewhat better 
financial feeling is creeping over Europe. In Berlin, where 
there was a money stringency for a long period, call money is 
much easier, and is for sale at 2V2 per cent, its lowest price for 
a long while. London also is reported to be in a more san- 
guine position. Europe is also taking a more rosy view of 
financial conditions in the United States regarding the currency, 
and tariff bills; and also the ability of this country to finance 
the handling of the immense crops this fall. This feeling 
abroad is expressing itself in reinvestments of some of our lead- 
ing rails, especially Canadian Pacific and the most prominent 
Easterns. The market, during the past week, continued its re- 
cent irregular course, advances being followed by the usual 
liquidation. The jolt of the week was Illinois Central cutting 
its annual rate from 2V 2 per cent to 5 per cent. Union Pacific 
sagged on the announcement, as it is carrying a heavy block 
of Illinois stock as an investment. Steel had a much better tone 
on the excellent showing made in its quarterly report, the best 
quarter since 1907, v/ith net earnings of $41,219,813 for the 
three months ending June 30th last. This is at the rate of 7 
per cent on preferred and 15.7 on common. Chicago and North- 
western closed its calendar year, June 30th, with earnings re- 
ported at about 10 per cent of the outstanding stock. Time 
money seems plentiful in New York, but on account of the crop 
moving requirements, banks are disinclined to make any large 
loans for long periods. Corn is the only crop that has met a 
setback, which was brought about by unusual heat during the 
past week. The government report on the grain crop generally 
is satisfactory, except in the case of corn. The cotton crop 
continues very encouraging. 



Trade in Local 
Stocks and Bonds. 



Earnings of local public utility com- 
panies continue to show a very 
satisfactory increase, and their mar- 
gin of safety above common and 
preferred dividends is steadily growing. Several of the leading 
electric lines gridironing thriving portions of the State are 
beginning to show more profitable results. Northern California 
Power was stronger this past week on account of increased 
earnings. The gross for June is reported at $70,000 and the 



Established 1858 SUTRO & COMPANY Inveslment Brokers 

410 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Comparative prices of leading local BONDS during past six 
months show that INVESTMENT SECURITIES are now selling 
at prices to yield higher returns than during recent years. 

—Price— Yield 

BONDS Jan., 1913 July. 1913 

Pac. Tel. & Tel. 5% 100 97 i% 

Cal. Gas & El. Unify. 6% 96 93 6% 

Spring Valley 4% 93 89 5% 

L. A. Pac. of Cal. 5% 100 95 5% 

Market St. First Cons. 6% 92'.i 89% 6% 

Pac. Gas & El. 5' J 90 85 6 

Write for special circular, descriptive of high-grade investments, 
yielding ' SIX (6rH PER CENT. 



August 2, 1913. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



net at $20,000. California Wine improved to $44 Vi on light 
buying. The Alaska Packers declared a $1% dividend, payable 
August 11th. The bond market was of fair proportions, but 
failed to develop any particular feature, on account of the 
quietness at present prevailing throughout the country in that 
line. Much interest is manifested in the vote to be held Au- 
gust 26th in this city on the question of issuing some $3,000,000 
in bonds for the purpose of raising funds to extend the munici- 
pal railway system. The difficulty the city experienced in en- 
deavoring to dispose of its last bond issue indicates there is 
trouble ahead along those lines for the administration. 



BANKING 



Local Mining 
Share Market 



Notices have been sent to share- 
holders of Mayflower Mining Com- 
pany outlining a plan to reorganize 
that company in a way to raise 
funds for a more aggressive development of that property. 
The plan cuts the present 2,000,000 share issue down to 1,000,- 
000 shares, and holders of the present stock will receive one- 
half the number of shares in the exchange, but the new shares 
will, of course, be estimated as worth double the value of the 
old issue. The plan also contemplates an assessment of two 
cents per share on the old stock, in order to raise the necessary 
funds to develop the property. The local mining share market 
was easier during the week, and trading was very light. More 
bogus certificates, raised from 100 to 1,000 shares, have come 
to the office here of Tonopah North Star. This discovery indi- 
cates that the forging is of wider extent than supposed. The 
company will call in all the stock, check up, and take up all 
the bogus issues, which so far amount to some eight certificates 
of 1,000 shares. The company will stand the loss. 



-Oakland has just voted bond issues to the amount of 



$2,940,000 tor municipal improvement. Of this sum, $796,000, 
for the completion of the New City Hall, was the only new 
issue. The remaining $2,144,000 represented substitute bonds 
voted in 1911 for a municipal auditorium, water front im- 
provements and schools. A sliding scale of interest not exceed- 
ing SVz per cent is available for the bonds just voted. The old 
bonds carried interest at four and one-half per cent. The 
buildings and improvements mentioned will materialize as fast 
as the bonds can be disposed of. As San Francisco and other 
large cities are meeting with difficulties in disposing of their 
bonds, even at increased rates of interest, Oakland may have to 
stand in the waiting line for a time with the others. 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases. Pacific Bulkiinp. 4th and Market streets. 



OLD FORESTER 

Don't Simply Ask for Whisky— Ask for 
OLD FORESTER 

It is Straight Old Whisky, direct from Diatillery in 
Kentucky, to You. Take a bottle home and treat 
your friends right. 

For Sale By All Dealers 

KENTUCKY MERCANTILE CO. 

488 Sutter St. San Francisco Phone Sutter 4031 



- y^ 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Pkid-Ur Capital $4,000,000 

Surplut ivnd Undiridad ProBti 11,400,000 
Total Resource! $40,000,000 



OFFICERS; 
HERBERT FLE1SHH1CKKR Preiideut 


SI G QREENEBAUH Chttrman of tb« Board 


WASHINGTON DODGE 


Vice-Pr«iid*nt 


JOS. FR1EDLANDER 


.Vic«-Proiidant 


C. F. HUNT 


Vic«-Pr«iidont 


R. ALTSCHUL 


Cmibitr 


C. R. PARKER 


AllilUnt Ciabiar 


WH. H. HIQH 


ii.l.Uul Cftihier 


H. CHOYNSKI 


it lilt* lit CklhUr 


G. R. BURDICK 


Ami • t»n t Cmitiior 


A. L. LANOERMAH 


Secrata.rf 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



READ OFFICE. TORONTO 



SIR EDMUND WALKER C.V.0..LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Manager 

JOHN AIRD Assistant General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital $15,000,000 

Reserve Fund 12,500,000 

Aggregate Resource 246,000,000 

TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 

and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
M«nb*r of the Aiiodated Savioffi Bioki »f Sin Francisco 
526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS ONLY- 
MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 
RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1913 

Assets $ 55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 

Employees' Pension Fund 158,261.32 

Number of Depositors 62,134 

OFFICE HOURS: 10 o'clock A.M. to 3 o'clock P. M . except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. lor receipt of deposits only 



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E. W. WILSON, Manager San Francisco Branch 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 2, 1913. 




Harness horses on track at State Fair. 



Revived Interest in Harness Racing 



The sport of driving, which has always been one of the most 
important of this State's diversions, and which does so much to 
encourage horse breeding in California, has recovered from a 
temporary lapse, and this season promises to be one of the best, 
from a racing standpoint, that the State has ever enjoyed. 

Local racing has attained a popularity that is astonishing. 
The speedway at the Stadium in Golden Gate Park is the 
scene of the contests cf the San Francisco and California Driv- 
ing Clubs. These organizations hold meets on alternate Sun- 
days, and the concrete grand stand built by the Park Commis- 
sioners for the comfort of the spectators is already inadequate 
to accommodate the crowds that turn out each week to see the 
sulky stars. 

The Coast circuit will soon start, and the sulky drivers are 
looking forward to the best season in years. Starting at Pleas- 
anton on August 14th, the circuit embraces racing at Woodland, 
Santa Rosa, Sacramento, during the State Fair, Pleasanton 
again, Fresno, Hanford and Los Angeles. Many of the horses 
will go to the meet at Phoenix, Arizona, which follows the 
California dates, and also to the numerous meetings which are 
carded for the Northwest in the fall. 
* * * 

As predicted by the lawn tennis experts, the United States 
won the Davis Cup, emblematic of the world's championship 
in this sport, and the major portion of the credit is due to a 
• native of this city, Maurice E. McLoughlin, who played re- 
markable tennis on the courts at Wimbledon in the challenge 
match against Great Britain. 

McLoughlin got off to a bad start. In the singles match on 
the opening day against J. C. Parke, he lost a five set match. 
His team-mate, R. Norn's Williams, of Harvard, however, de- 
feated C. P. Dixon, Britain's other singles representative, and 
the nations were even on the day. On Saturday, McLoughlin 
and Harold H. Hackett engaged Dixon and Barrett in the 
doubles match. Hackett was in poor form, and it looked as if 
the Britishers would win the match, as they played steadily to 
"Hackett. But McLoughlin realized that his partner was not in 
form, and he "took the bull by the horns," and played all over 
the court, taking many strokes that belonged to Hackett, and 
by his brilliancy and ability to stand the extra work that was 
forced on him, won the match for his country, making the 
score of matches two to one in favor of the United States. 

The result of the contest depended on the two singles matches 
scheduled for Monday. With Williams paired with Parke, who 
was Britain's most dangerous man, it was up to McLoughlin to 
take his match with Dixon. He was expected to win, but even 
his most ardent admirers scarcely expected him to carry off the 
match in the brilliant fashion that he did. McLoughlin wo